On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!

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If you and your dog are taking a trip by vehicle, finding the best travel dog crate that is suitable and fits your car is actually an easy task, since majority of these travel carriers are designed for cars first. If you are both travelling by plane, it is a good idea to be aware of the airline crate policies before purchasing one of your own, as airlines require specific dimensions and rules for travelling with pets in crates. Fortunately, some of the pet carriers are already airline approved, and others are easy to get accepted.

I have a friend, who doesn’t have such crate and thinks that is it’s soft and made from a textile it’ll be always dirty and wet. But I’m here just to say that if you’re thinking in such way, you’re absolutely wrong! Just look at the crates made from a waterproof material and which are comfortable for your pet to stay not only indoors but in a different transport too.
I am using this cage currently for 2 of my 4 dogs, a little tiny 2 pound chihuahua and an 8 pound mix puppy. Sometimes they "share" and sometimes its just for one or the other. They both "fit" with room to spare. It comes with a divider if I want to keep them separate but so far I have not done so. It's too big to use as a housebreaking aid because it leaves them room to "go" without disturbing their natural instincts to keep their den clean but if I wanted to use it for that it could be done by using the divider. I hesitated for a long time about what size to get and this one seems nice, not too big or too small, it is certainly plenty tall for them.

The wire is thinner than my old crate, which is also made of the black metal, but it is still sturdy. I used to have the really heavy silver steel crates but they are ugly and stronger than necessary. I guess if you have a dog you think might get out, you should use zip-ties all around and bungee the door when the dog is inside. The ... full review
Crate training, when done effectively, can be a helpful tool. Not only does it provide your new puppy with a sense of safety and stability, it also provides you, as a new puppy owner, with a way to establish order and rule in your home. Implemented and followed through with correctly, crate training is a win for all parties involved – especially for your puppy.
I come home at lunch so she is crated fro 8 am to noon and then again from 1 pm until 3 pm when my son gets home from school. Every day, she has a potty accident (poop) in her crate before I come home at noon. She is a very good pup and loves her crate at night but HATES for me to leave in the morning. I am worried she won’t grow out of pooping in her crate during the day and will continue to be anxious and sad while we are not home. Would it be better for me to leave her in the bathroom with a puppy pads and toys while I go to work since she does well in her crate at night already? I have tried leaving the TV on for her to keep her entertained and feeling less anxious. I have tried leaving the room dark and quiet so she might just sleep. Nothing seems to work. Thanks for any input!
This is a very nice carrier with a top and side door. The top door is not a moon roof. I like the top door--a lot-- because once I catch one of the little monst—I mean cats, I don’t want to have to shove it in the door. I love the drop-a-cat door. It cuts down on my injuries by 90%. The little bugg—, I mean cat, only got me once instead of leaving a full set of scratch marks on my hands and arms.
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On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
The biggest problem in choosing a travel crate is to buy the right size, that’ll be suitable for your pet. I used some special calculators for this, but your guide helped me with everything else. I finally ordered The 2Pet foldable Dog Crate (liked it for the fabric) and we tried it in a road trip. It’s quite comfortable for my dog, he’s less stressful as I can see.

Wire, metal crates are a top pick for crate training for several reasons: Their mesh-like, collapsible structure makes them easy to disassemble and transport, and, when constructed, provides a high level of visibility and ventilation for your pup while in the crate. Like plastic crates, metal, wire crates are also easy to clean out should your pup have an accident in their home. Sturdy and often escape proof, these crates make a great option for growing dogs as you can purchase a larger size and easily close off the extra space with a divider while they’re smaller, removing it or moving it as they grow.

Venturing away from standard best travel dog crates, we've now coming into the territory of heavy duty dog cages for travel which is yet to be dominated by one single manufacturer. However, the Variocage is one of the best heavy duty dog travel cages due to its smart design, stylish looks, high quality material and crash tests. These are very expensive travel cages for dogs, but well worth the investment if you're looking something for large dogs and long distance travel. Not only do these heavy and indestructible dog cages look very stylish, but they've been ranked best for crash tests. These travel dog crates are very comfortable for dogs and easy to clean too. In addition, for added security, the Variocage includes a built-in key lock.

My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
The perfect crate should be just large enough for a puppy to go inside, turn around, and lie down to sleep, but not so large that your dog can soil one side of the crate and sleep on the other side. Of course, puppies grow. So take into account your pup’s future adult size before investing in a pricey dog crate. Large crates are available with partitions for you to “shrink” to puppy size, and then enlarge the area as your puppy grows. You can also purchase an adult-size crate, and insert a barrier like a plastic storage box that shrinks the space to puppy proportions until your pet grows into its crate. 
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