Wire dog crates are ideal for pets with long coats or those who live in warmer climates. The continuous air flow keeps them cool while the open design allows them to see their surroundings. Wire and metal dog crate sizes range from X-Small, for a max weight of 20 LBS, all the way up to XX-Large, for a max weight of 140 LBS. While it’s good to know your dog’s weight, you can also reference our crate sizing guide to get a better idea of which size works for each breed.
Your dog’s safety is in jeopardy when she is not strapped into your car in some way. If you were to get into an accident, your dog would likely be thrown from the vehicle. Secured safely in a crate or harness, however, your dog will stay in the car in the case of a collision. A crate can also offer some protection from impact and debris. You love your dog, and you don’t want to take the risk that she could be injured or killed while you remain safely in your seat, held in by your seatbelt.
The perfect crate should be just large enough for a puppy to go inside, turn around, and lie down to sleep, but not so large that your dog can soil one side of the crate and sleep on the other side. Of course, puppies grow. So take into account your pup’s future adult size before investing in a pricey dog crate. Large crates are available with partitions for you to “shrink” to puppy size, and then enlarge the area as your puppy grows. You can also purchase an adult-size crate, and insert a barrier like a plastic storage box that shrinks the space to puppy proportions until your pet grows into its crate. 
After having this crate for two months I've come to the conclusion that this is AWESOME. I am buying two more... one for each dog. It is easy to store (folds flat), transport (MUCH easier to set up in a SUV or car than one of those metal crates), carry (the handle is nice), and clean (take off the cover; wash, dry, put back on easily and there are no issues with wear and tear from the W/D as of yet).
Addendum added January 28, 2013: My vet had never noticed these carriers because I had never put one up on the exam table until my last vet visit. She looked at it with interest and totally concurred with my opinion of having a small, but open carrier for my two (panicky) cats. She has seen more than a few overheated pets in too enclosed carriers. Since I live far from the vet I always carry spare towels for the bottoms of the carriers and she found that the "stable floor covering'* I use was an additional comfort feature for my pets long trip to their appointments. (I just ordered the larger size of this carrier for my "Phat Kat" and will donate her previous carrier to our local animal shelter.)

The best crate is the one which costs not much, which is easy to carry, your pet should love it. The pleasant bonuses are when there is a napkin already and you don’t have to buy anything. Look at the variants in the guide. There’s only one that suits everything I said, and that’s because I have this crate for a long period of time and recommend to everybody (I’m talking about The Go Pet Club Soft Pet Crate).


We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
tether the dog to you when in the house, or section off a room or play area. this way you will be able to see him and get outside if he is looking like he needs to go. when you take him out to potty, give him 5-10 minutes. if he doesn’t go crate him for 15-30 min, then try again. lots of praise and extra treats when he goes. you won’t be crating all the time, just until he goes potty outside, then you housed be safe to tether him to you inside until next go around
All of Petmate plastic travel dog crates, including this one, come in a variety of sizes to fit most dog breeds, although you'll be hard pressed to find one for a large breed (mostly, it's for small to medium dogs). The wire doors of these crates lock shut with a chrome squeeze door latch. The crates are shipped as two half shells and are very easy to assemble. They come with no-rust plastic wing nuts. These crates are also equipped with side air vents.
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