Because your domesticated dog will treat their crate just as a wild dog would treat their den, he will not want to soil their sleeping space. Therefore, you can be sure that, if at all possible, your dog will not have an accident in their crate, so when you let them out of their crate to go outside, he will naturally seize that opportunity to relieve themself. While there are other methods of house training your puppy, this is a very instinctual transition, requiring mainly that you take your puppy out of their crate at reasonable intervals to use the restroom. This way, your puppy will pretty easily, and perceptively, pick up that he is expected to do their business outside, not in.
Petego Pet Tube Car Kennel – And for something completely different, if you don't have an extra large dog who needs an indestructible cage but rather looking for something to fit multiple dogs at the back of your car, this may be a great alternative. This pet tube travel car kennel from Petego will be much cheaper and look substantially better in your car, and it also folds.
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.

Venturing away from standard best travel dog crates, we've now coming into the territory of heavy duty dog cages for travel which is yet to be dominated by one single manufacturer. However, the Variocage is one of the best heavy duty dog travel cages due to its smart design, stylish looks, high quality material and crash tests. These are very expensive travel cages for dogs, but well worth the investment if you're looking something for large dogs and long distance travel. Not only do these heavy and indestructible dog cages look very stylish, but they've been ranked best for crash tests. These travel dog crates are very comfortable for dogs and easy to clean too. In addition, for added security, the Variocage includes a built-in key lock.
Whether you have a new puppy or an adult dog, you want to pick just the right dog kennel. After all, the kennel will serve as a part-time “home” for your dog. You want him to be safe while he’s in it, whether it’s during a time you’re not home or when you’re traveling together. A good dog kennel is sturdy and durable – strong enough that he won’t chew his way out of it while you’re running errands, but comfortable enough for him to feel good while inside. At BestReviews, we can help you find the right dog kennel for your beloved friend. We researched the dog kennel market and selected what we feel to be the very best offerings. We did not accept free samples from manufacturers during our research, because we strive to be completely honest and bias-free. For a quick overview of the best dog kennels, check out the chart above. For more information on dog kennels and how to choose one that’s right for your pet, continue reading this guide.
This is the cutest crate ever. I love the pink color. My dog will even go in here when everyone is home just to chew on her bones or take a nap. A size small perfectly fits a 20 lb Boston/Pug mix. If your dog is an escape artist, however, you might want a different crate because this latch is kind of easy for them to unhinge. My dog has escaped two times, but that was when her separation anxiety was a lot worse, which I think helped catalyze her escape.
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.

Bring your puppy to the crate for naps and quiet-time breaks so that he can “unwind” from family chaos. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.
If you have an SUV or van that opens from the back and dogs that aren’t always clean when they get in the car, you may want a dog crate that lets you load your dogs directly into the back. This effective crate is designed to fit two crates in the back of your vehicle so that two dogs can travel in comfort and safety, while enjoying the view out the back.
PetPeppy dog travel carrier is not waterproof or water-resistant and may be difficult to clean due to its construction and the materials used. The main reason a pet owner would buy this is due to how easy it is to carry it, especially if you have small dogs. The expandable space is also a huge advantage since you can store your dog's toys and other supplies without having to carry them with you, but that obviously makes the crate less ergonomic and expands its sides, which makes it less easy to carry.
Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.
For what it is, PetPeppy is easily the best dog travel carrier compared to others because it's more sturdy and safe for dogs. While no additional sizes are available of this carrier, you can fit a small or small-medium dog into this travel dog crate but note that a lot of dogs find these crates uncomfortable during long trips, therefore it's best for short distance travel and short flights where you can attend to your dog faster.
Researching your options will be the next step, and I've done a ton of legwork for you with the above list of twenty best dog travel crates, listing their specifications and the modes of travel they are best used for. These travel dog crates are all safe, comfortable choices for your canine, but you'll have to find out if they meet the traveling guidelines that you need to follow and pick the right size after measuring your dog.
Finally, you'll want to be sure to check with the travel agency (if you're using one) and all locations where you will be staying to make sure that both pets and the type of crate you're taking are allowed. Remember to ask if they have unique crate specifications. This is particularly true for airlines, because each airline has their own guidelines, but the same can be said for every bus service, train service, and hotels. Planning ahead could save you from dealing with unnecessary issues during your travels.
What I’m trying to understand is how do I keep puppy safe/keep from potting at night if I don’t keep him in the crate at night? We brought our puppy home a week ago and he’s slept in the crate since the first night. Outside of the first night, he’s slept through (10p-6a). I stayed downstairs with him the first 3 or 4 nights and moved him further into the kitchen each night. I’ve moved back up to my bedroom the last 3 nights. He yelps 5-10 minutes and then goes to sleep. Occasionally I put him in the crate during the day (preparing meals, using the bathroom). Am I doing more harm than good because he wasn’t introduced more gradually?
One dog owner said she actually layed on the ground becide her whining pup. I was thinking that if all you concerned dog owners spent half as much time love and concern with humans as you do with your pets this world might be a better place. Maybe more respect for others and not so much crime. Who knows….maybe humans might like the love from other humans.
Bring your puppy to the crate for naps and quiet-time breaks so that he can “unwind” from family chaos. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.
My friends went to Hawaii and left me their dog. Everything was ok until I didn’t receive an important call that I should have gone to another city. It was a catastrophe! I was searching for a travel crate knowing nothing about dogs, crates and travelling with them. But the first one I’ve bought was quite ok, I know that my friends still use it. And now I have a dog too and try to find something really good.

Most dogs love to ride in the car. The wind rushing by carries all kinds of interesting smells that your dog just can’t take in quickly enough, while every stop gives your dog a chance to take in an interesting scene. Add to this the fact that usually going in the car means your dog is going to a fun destination, and it makes perfect sense that being in the car would be a very exciting thing for your dog.


My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!

I read all of the positive and negative reviews before ordering this crate with cover. It was packaged well. The instructions were clear and set up took 10-15 minutes. It is really roomy and my 73lb Bulldog went right in. The wood looks great and the cage is strong. I use only the front gate, so I put zip-ties on the side door latches and top opening, although I don't think it really needs it.

2PET Foldable Dog Crate – Another similar design as best dog travel crate from EliteField, this one is less sturdy and softer than EliteField crate, which can be either a good or a bad thing, depending on what you're looking for and your type of travel. They're available in similar sizes and three colors. As for the features, they're exactly the same as EliteField dog crate, but this one is cheaper.


I have a little 16 week lab. I got her from 8 weeks and what a nightmare. Being the one who took her away from the little I became mum. I could not go anywhere without her howling. From day 1 I was going to create train. The first night was fine but then she was howling during g the day in there. She was always ok at night but then got in a habit of waking up at 0430am and barking and howling for my attention. You have to ignor! They need to learn that this is my house and my rules. My friend gave me a great creating routine where you wake up straight out to the toilet, then breakfast and plAy, then creat for 2 hrs, then straight out to the toilet, then creat for 2 hrs, then toilet then play time then create then toilet etc etc until bedtime. My puppy learnt after 3 days where the toilet was and now as long as the back door is open she takes herself outside. Self creates if she is tried nd sleeps all night until 0730-0800 in her create with the door shut no issues.

I am using this cage currently for 2 of my 4 dogs, a little tiny 2 pound chihuahua and an 8 pound mix puppy. Sometimes they "share" and sometimes its just for one or the other. They both "fit" with room to spare. It comes with a divider if I want to keep them separate but so far I have not done so. It's too big to use as a housebreaking aid because it leaves them room to "go" without disturbing their natural instincts to keep their den clean but if I wanted to use it for that it could be done by using the divider. I hesitated for a long time about what size to get and this one seems nice, not too big or too small, it is certainly plenty tall for them.


Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
Once you’ve decided that crate training is for you, and which crate suits your canine companion best, it’s time to look at the actual process of crate training your pup. While the length of time it takes to crate train depends on your individual animal, his or her attitude, age, and past experiences, one thing’s for sure: you always want your dog to associate the crate with something pleasant. And even with the best dogs, baby steps are the best way to make this happen.
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