Keeping your specific needs, preferences, and details about your pet’s size in mind while looking at different options is an easy way to be sure you’ll pick the perfect travel crate for your dog. There are so many wonderful options, and you are sure to find a soft sided crate that keeps your furry companion happier and safer. Please leave us a comment below with your favorite travel crate options or a fun story about traveling with your pet.
For those with a new puppy or a nervous small dog, a cozy and secure travel crate can help make travel fun and easy. This little crate also comes with a comfortable shoulder strap so that you can go from car to your destination with ease. It is important to socialize your young puppy, but you don’t want to expose her to anything that other dogs might carry until she has finished with her vaccinations, so a convenient carrier like this is important to let you bring puppy along while keeping her safe from contagious disease.
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Petego Pet Tube Car Kennel – And for something completely different, if you don't have an extra large dog who needs an indestructible cage but rather looking for something to fit multiple dogs at the back of your car, this may be a great alternative. This pet tube travel car kennel from Petego will be much cheaper and look substantially better in your car, and it also folds.

Wire dog crates are ideal for pets with long coats or those who live in warmer climates. The continuous air flow keeps them cool while the open design allows them to see their surroundings. Wire and metal dog crate sizes range from X-Small, for a max weight of 20 LBS, all the way up to XX-Large, for a max weight of 140 LBS. While it’s good to know your dog’s weight, you can also reference our crate sizing guide to get a better idea of which size works for each breed.
Our 48-inch XXL Dog Crates accommodate dogs weighing 91-150 pounds. See dog crates size guide if you are unsure if the XXlarge dog crate is appropriate for you pet. Manufacturers of dog crates have their own measure of Large, XL, XXL crates - please check the dimension of our XXL dog crates when making a purchase. See all dog crate sizes on our Dog Crates and Dog Cages page.  
Another leader in its category, PetPeppy's premium airline approved dog travel crate is visually appealing, stylish and comes with a ton of features that makes it easy to carry your dog. It only comes in a single color (black with red accent) and have huge mesh windows on each side that will give your dog lots of ventilation. It's expandable that allows for tons of extra storage. As with all other pet carriers, this best dog travel crate doesn't need any assembly and it somewhat collapsible if you need to store it away. You won't need any tools for this one either.
I come home at lunch so she is crated fro 8 am to noon and then again from 1 pm until 3 pm when my son gets home from school. Every day, she has a potty accident (poop) in her crate before I come home at noon. She is a very good pup and loves her crate at night but HATES for me to leave in the morning. I am worried she won’t grow out of pooping in her crate during the day and will continue to be anxious and sad while we are not home. Would it be better for me to leave her in the bathroom with a puppy pads and toys while I go to work since she does well in her crate at night already? I have tried leaving the TV on for her to keep her entertained and feeling less anxious. I have tried leaving the room dark and quiet so she might just sleep. Nothing seems to work. Thanks for any input!
Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 
If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.
Our XXL dog crates are in stock and ready to ship, so choose the Midwest Dog Crate that is ideal for your pet and home, and we will ship it to you straight away. We believe in these products and are confident that you will find Midwest Extra Large Dog Crates well-built, great-looking and strong enough to last a lifetime. Your Great Dane, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Saint Bernard or other giant breed dog will love their Midwest 1154U Single Door Dog Crate or Solutions SL54DD Double Door Dog Crate.
Addendum added January 28, 2013: My vet had never noticed these carriers because I had never put one up on the exam table until my last vet visit. She looked at it with interest and totally concurred with my opinion of having a small, but open carrier for my two (panicky) cats. She has seen more than a few overheated pets in too enclosed carriers. Since I live far from the vet I always carry spare towels for the bottoms of the carriers and she found that the "stable floor covering'* I use was an additional comfort feature for my pets long trip to their appointments. (I just ordered the larger size of this carrier for my "Phat Kat" and will donate her previous carrier to our local animal shelter.)
Another leader in its category, PetPeppy's premium airline approved dog travel crate is visually appealing, stylish and comes with a ton of features that makes it easy to carry your dog. It only comes in a single color (black with red accent) and have huge mesh windows on each side that will give your dog lots of ventilation. It's expandable that allows for tons of extra storage. As with all other pet carriers, this best dog travel crate doesn't need any assembly and it somewhat collapsible if you need to store it away. You won't need any tools for this one either.
Never leave a puppy in his crate all day; he needs several bathroom breaks, as well as play and feeding times. Even though he won’t want to soil his sleeping area, if he is in there for extremely long stretches, he just might. (He can’t help it!) And if he does, it is because his owner has neglected his responsibility, not because the dog has misbehaved.
If your pup begins whining at this stage, it could be a sign that you’ve moved too fast. Return to a length of time where he’s comfortable without whining and move forward from there. If he does whine, do not let your dog out unless he stops or he will begin to associate whining with being let out. This is not a habit you want to start or perpetuate.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
Wire dog crates are ideal for pets with long coats or those who live in warmer climates. The continuous air flow keeps them cool while the open design allows them to see their surroundings. Wire and metal dog crate sizes range from X-Small, for a max weight of 20 LBS, all the way up to XX-Large, for a max weight of 140 LBS. While it’s good to know your dog’s weight, you can also reference our crate sizing guide to get a better idea of which size works for each breed.

If you and your dog are taking a trip by vehicle, finding the best travel dog crate that is suitable and fits your car is actually an easy task, since majority of these travel carriers are designed for cars first. If you are both travelling by plane, it is a good idea to be aware of the airline crate policies before purchasing one of your own, as airlines require specific dimensions and rules for travelling with pets in crates. Fortunately, some of the pet carriers are already airline approved, and others are easy to get accepted.
Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet. … more
Plastic crates are maybe not the first choice for an in-home crate as they provide less visibility to the pup that calls it home, however, if you plan to do quite a bit of travel by plane, this is a great option as all airlines require this type of crate to transport your animal. Plastic crates are also great for pups that need a little more security, or for a home that has a higher level of activity (think on-the-go kiddos), as it gives your pup a bit more privacy.
I’ve never crate trained before, this is all new to me. My new puppy pees the bed when I let her sleep with me and she needs to be in the crate while I’m at work for 4 to 5 hours. She likes her crate and wont potty in it, but cries at night. I think she just needs to potty during the night like I do. I’m going to try taking her out every time I go pee and putting her back in. When she stops peeing the my bed at night she can sleep with me. I’ve never had a puppy pee my bed at night before, but she’s wat too small to jump down and up by hersel, and not yet house broken. Other than that she’s great, and this artical isn’t all wrong. Dogs dont like to potty where they sleep and eat, and they are pack animals so they usually sleep together. I feel bad making her sleep alone right now.

One of the few large soft-sided crates, this travel crate fits into the back of most SUVs or hatchbacks. It pops up and folds out quickly, and the durable outside makes it suitable for camping or rougher environments. The stronger material makes it good for rougher dogs or puppies who may be teething, and it has both a side and a top entrance for ease of use.
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.

Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.


My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.
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