DevotedToDOG.com is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com and any other website that may be affiliated with Amazon Service LLC Associates Program. These links operate the same as all referral links on DevotedToDOG.com. If you use one and buy something, then Amazon will pay DevotedToDOG.com a percentage of the sale amount.

If your pup begins whining at this stage, it could be a sign that you’ve moved too fast. Return to a length of time where he’s comfortable without whining and move forward from there. If he does whine, do not let your dog out unless he stops or he will begin to associate whining with being let out. This is not a habit you want to start or perpetuate.


On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
If you and your dog are taking a trip by vehicle, finding the best travel dog crate that is suitable and fits your car is actually an easy task, since majority of these travel carriers are designed for cars first. If you are both travelling by plane, it is a good idea to be aware of the airline crate policies before purchasing one of your own, as airlines require specific dimensions and rules for travelling with pets in crates. Fortunately, some of the pet carriers are already airline approved, and others are easy to get accepted.
Your dog’s safety is in jeopardy when she is not strapped into your car in some way. If you were to get into an accident, your dog would likely be thrown from the vehicle. Secured safely in a crate or harness, however, your dog will stay in the car in the case of a collision. A crate can also offer some protection from impact and debris. You love your dog, and you don’t want to take the risk that she could be injured or killed while you remain safely in your seat, held in by your seatbelt.
If you and your dog are taking a trip by vehicle, finding the best travel dog crate that is suitable and fits your car is actually an easy task, since majority of these travel carriers are designed for cars first. If you are both travelling by plane, it is a good idea to be aware of the airline crate policies before purchasing one of your own, as airlines require specific dimensions and rules for travelling with pets in crates. Fortunately, some of the pet carriers are already airline approved, and others are easy to get accepted.
There is more than one way to keep your dog firmly in one spot. Harnesses offer your dog more freedom, acting more or less as seat belt attachments for your dog. Harnesses do nothing for your upholstery, windows, or door. If you keep your dog firmly in a middle seat you may be able to prevent drooling on the windows and doors, but this won’t protect the upholstery, and your dog may be able to reach into the front seat.
One of the few large soft-sided crates, this travel crate fits into the back of most SUVs or hatchbacks. It pops up and folds out quickly, and the durable outside makes it suitable for camping or rougher environments. The stronger material makes it good for rougher dogs or puppies who may be teething, and it has both a side and a top entrance for ease of use.

Arf Pets 3 Door Crate with Strap – Essentially the same type as the EliteField's crate, Arf Pets' dog travel crate is a great alternative with a slightly different design. It's a less popular option among pet owners who travel, but it's available in different sizes and several new color schemes. The only reason to buy Art Pets over EliteField is if you prefer their colors or offered sizes, because the price, materials used and the implemented design features are exactly the same as EliteField's.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help
I have a little 16 week lab. I got her from 8 weeks and what a nightmare. Being the one who took her away from the little I became mum. I could not go anywhere without her howling. From day 1 I was going to create train. The first night was fine but then she was howling during g the day in there. She was always ok at night but then got in a habit of waking up at 0430am and barking and howling for my attention. You have to ignor! They need to learn that this is my house and my rules. My friend gave me a great creating routine where you wake up straight out to the toilet, then breakfast and plAy, then creat for 2 hrs, then straight out to the toilet, then creat for 2 hrs, then toilet then play time then create then toilet etc etc until bedtime. My puppy learnt after 3 days where the toilet was and now as long as the back door is open she takes herself outside. Self creates if she is tried nd sleeps all night until 0730-0800 in her create with the door shut no issues.
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
// Forces popover to close when the user clicks anywhere on the page $(function(){ // fnGetNearestLocations(storeId, expirationMin, isHTML5Geolocation, isGoogleGeoAPI, HTML5GeoTimeout, XHRTimeout, isDebuggingEnabled) petcoNearestLocations.fnGetNearestLocations('10151','20160','true','true','10000','5000','https://www.googleapis.com/geolocation/v1/geolocate?key=','AIzaSyB1POydsXY7SJBDX-zowEC0y340ZJK6uig','false'); });
Show it to the dog, let it smell and taste the treat, and then toss it inside the crate and shut the door, with the puppy outside the crate and the treat on the inside. That shows that an absolutely scrumptious puppy treat is inside, out of paw-reach. And after the pup has begged and scratched and whined to get inside, open the door and let it get the toy inside the crate. Allow your pup to chew and enjoy it for five minutes with the door shut and the dog remaining in the crate. Some pups settle down and enjoy their treat with no fanfare. Others throw a fit and want out. So if your puppy fusses let it out, but lock the treat back inside. You’re teaching the dog that wonderful things can be found inside the crate. Most pups learn to tolerate the door shut at least as long as they have something to munch.
×

We read thousands of reviews! Here are the best in each category:

Pet Kennel

Foldable Crate Metal Crate
Pet Kennel
Foldable dog crate
metal crate
pet kennel foldable dog crate metal crate

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!