Wire, metal crates are a top pick for crate training for several reasons: Their mesh-like, collapsible structure makes them easy to disassemble and transport, and, when constructed, provides a high level of visibility and ventilation for your pup while in the crate. Like plastic crates, metal, wire crates are also easy to clean out should your pup have an accident in their home. Sturdy and often escape proof, these crates make a great option for growing dogs as you can purchase a larger size and easily close off the extra space with a divider while they’re smaller, removing it or moving it as they grow.
AmazonBasics Two-Door Top-Load Kennel – Amazon offers their own dog travel crate as a direct competitor to Petmate's option, and this one has almost the exact features but is available at a slightly lower price and with slightly lower quality. AmazonBasics travel crate for dogs also has only two sizes for small dogs and available only in one color. Other than that, it resembles Petmate's crate very closely.

Go PetClub Soft-Sided Dog Crate is the perfect compact and lightweight kennel for your pup. It features a water resistant, heavy duty polyester cover with PVC backing. It’s the perfect portable home for you and your furry friend. The screen mesh door provides secure confinement and adjustable ventilation on all four sides. Plus, it comes with a sheepskin dog mat and removable lambs-wool floor pad designed for extra comfort. Firstrax Noz2Noz Sof-Krate N2 Series Indoor and Outdoor Pet House is a stylish and lightweight soft-crate that’s washable, durable and well ventilated. It’s perfect for use indoors or outdoors. Plus, it’s collapsible for easy transfer from room to room or for travel purposes. And the rounded corners protect car interiors and home décor.
MidWest iCrate Folding Metal Dog Crate – The best alternative to Life Stages travel dog crate is another option from the same company, their extremely popular iCrate. With double doors, tons of different sizes, heavy duty latches and carrying handles, this is easily one of the best metal travel dog crates. You will not go wrong with either Life Stages or the iCrate since they offer similar features.

Hi . We’ve only had our puppy 4 days and she’s doing well with the toilet training . Our problem is she doesn’t like being on her own and she barks and howls when put in her crate at night.I know it’s early days but it upsets me to hear her we’ve made it cosy for her and she will go in if her own accord but once we’ve left the room she gets really distressed. Any ideas ? Marie
My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!

Your dog’s safety is in jeopardy when she is not strapped into your car in some way. If you were to get into an accident, your dog would likely be thrown from the vehicle. Secured safely in a crate or harness, however, your dog will stay in the car in the case of a collision. A crate can also offer some protection from impact and debris. You love your dog, and you don’t want to take the risk that she could be injured or killed while you remain safely in your seat, held in by your seatbelt.
This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after. To make matters worse, the packaging materials included styrofoam that must have been damaged in transit. The structural foam had dissintegrated causing a snow storm in the house that was very difficult to vaccuum up because of the static charge. Lastly, the crate pieces were bent when they arrived, so the packaging isn't great for shipping. This further complicated assembly because the hooks that connect the pieces saw the bulk of the damage. My dog doesn't challenge the structural integrity of the kennel, but I would guess an ambitious dog can quickly defeat this enclosure. I would not buy this one again if I could go back. In fact, I am looking for another XXL crate to use for trips so I never have to reassemble this one again... It's just not worth the hassle to return this given the price. … more
If you will be removing the crate from the vehicle regularly, a wire crate can be an excellent choice. As these crates fold in and collapse easily for storage, it is easy to remove them from a car when you are done. They also can be tied down easily through the wires to secure them into place. If the crate will remain in the vehicle, a solid sided plastic crate can be useful. These crates come with spots to tie them in place, and the solid crate gives your dog a safe, secure feeling inside of their enclosed space. Either of these types can be easily sized with a pad or a bed to make the crate more comfortable for the dog inside. For smaller dogs, soft-sided crates are an option, but they are more difficult to keep in place due to their more malleable materials. Soft-sided crates typically do not come for pets that are 25 pounds or more, and are not as durable as hard sided crates. Lastly, car harnesses that attach the dog directly to a seatbelt are a choice, and while they are incredibly easy to set up simply by clicking them in place, they can be less reliable in a crash or accident. There are many different choices, so keep reading below to see what may be best for you.
Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.
Aspen Pet Pet Porter Plastic Kennel – This is a great alternative to Petmate's best dog travel crate because Aspen Pet offers larger sizes than Petmate ever has, with dogs up to 90-100 lbs. You still can't fit a very large breed here, but medium dogs won't have any problems, provided you can pick them up. Aspen Pet travel crate is, however, more than twice as expensive due to large size.

By familiarizing your puppy with a crate early on, you’re not only creating an easy avenue for house training, you’re also allowing them to become comfortable with their future means of transportation. A crate is a great way to transport your pup – whether it’s a short trip to the vet or a big move across country – and by familiarizing your pup with a crate early on, you’ll make travel a lot easier and more comfortable for your canine companion.


Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.

Sherpa Original Deluxe Carrier – Sherpa has been manufacturing carriers for decades, and their original deluxe travel dog carrier is easily the best one of standard dog travel carrier options. It's more stylish, the quality of materials used and the design itself is higher than that of PetPeppy or AmazonBasics, but it's more expensive than Amazon's pet carrier and it doesn't offer the extra features that PetPeppy does.


Plastic crates are maybe not the first choice for an in-home crate as they provide less visibility to the pup that calls it home, however, if you plan to do quite a bit of travel by plane, this is a great option as all airlines require this type of crate to transport your animal. Plastic crates are also great for pups that need a little more security, or for a home that has a higher level of activity (think on-the-go kiddos), as it gives your pup a bit more privacy.

Sliverylake Heavy Duty Metal Cage – An even cheaper alternative is this heavy duty metal cage from Sliverylake. The design is simpler and it's not as sturdy as either ProSelect of Variocage, but if you don'g have a hyperactive extra large dog, then this may be a better choice considering that you also pay significantly less for it. The standard features will be more than enough.


Never leave a puppy in his crate all day; he needs several bathroom breaks, as well as play and feeding times. Even though he won’t want to soil his sleeping area, if he is in there for extremely long stretches, he just might. (He can’t help it!) And if he does, it is because his owner has neglected his responsibility, not because the dog has misbehaved.
Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks

If you will be removing the crate from the vehicle regularly, a wire crate can be an excellent choice. As these crates fold in and collapse easily for storage, it is easy to remove them from a car when you are done. They also can be tied down easily through the wires to secure them into place. If the crate will remain in the vehicle, a solid sided plastic crate can be useful. These crates come with spots to tie them in place, and the solid crate gives your dog a safe, secure feeling inside of their enclosed space. Either of these types can be easily sized with a pad or a bed to make the crate more comfortable for the dog inside. For smaller dogs, soft-sided crates are an option, but they are more difficult to keep in place due to their more malleable materials. Soft-sided crates typically do not come for pets that are 25 pounds or more, and are not as durable as hard sided crates. Lastly, car harnesses that attach the dog directly to a seatbelt are a choice, and while they are incredibly easy to set up simply by clicking them in place, they can be less reliable in a crash or accident. There are many different choices, so keep reading below to see what may be best for you.
I have a rat terrier puppy and wanted to find a quality and reasonably priced kennel for her to begin her crate training, and for use for travel when we make our frequent road trips to visit extended family. Our puppy is expected to be approximately 35lbs, so I purchased the MEDIUM size because I wanted a crate that would also be able ... full review
Once your puppy accepts the crate as a fact of puppy life, you can move the crate to a more acceptable spot in the house. A place next to your own bed will let the puppy sleep in its own spot but near your familiar smells and presence. That also offers you a more private area to seclude it, when necessary, from activities in the living area or kitchen that might keep your dog overstimulated.
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