Update: We traveled quite a bit this holiday season and this portable crate was absolutely awesome! I have seen some reviews about bad zippers but suspect it's due to misuse. You have to raise each side before zipping it -- just common sense, people. Otherwise, there is too much pressure on the zipper. I think zippers on this crate are sturdy. Another suggestion is placing your dog's favorite bed inside. The crate (we have extra large) has plenty of room to add an extra large fluffy dog bed our dog loves. Because the crate folds flat, we place the crate in the cargo area and cover it with dog's bed when on the road. The dog sprawls like a queen! :) When we get to the destination, we unfold the crate, throw the bed inside, and voila -- cozy house that ... full review
Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.

The biggest problem in choosing a travel crate is to buy the right size, that’ll be suitable for your pet. I used some special calculators for this, but your guide helped me with everything else. I finally ordered The 2Pet foldable Dog Crate (liked it for the fabric) and we tried it in a road trip. It’s quite comfortable for my dog, he’s less stressful as I can see.


If you and your dog are taking a trip by vehicle, finding the best travel dog crate that is suitable and fits your car is actually an easy task, since majority of these travel carriers are designed for cars first. If you are both travelling by plane, it is a good idea to be aware of the airline crate policies before purchasing one of your own, as airlines require specific dimensions and rules for travelling with pets in crates. Fortunately, some of the pet carriers are already airline approved, and others are easy to get accepted.

Choose a well-ventilated crate that is large enough for your puppy to stand up, lie down, and turn around. Remember that your puppy’s crate will have to grow as he does, so purchase a crate that is appropriate for your dog’s expected full-grown size, and use a divider to make the crate smaller for the time being. Many crates available at pet-supply stores include dividers.
Never leave a puppy in his crate all day; he needs several bathroom breaks, as well as play and feeding times. Even though he won’t want to soil his sleeping area, if he is in there for extremely long stretches, he just might. (He can’t help it!) And if he does, it is because his owner has neglected his responsibility, not because the dog has misbehaved.
On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.

What I’m trying to understand is how do I keep puppy safe/keep from potting at night if I don’t keep him in the crate at night? We brought our puppy home a week ago and he’s slept in the crate since the first night. Outside of the first night, he’s slept through (10p-6a). I stayed downstairs with him the first 3 or 4 nights and moved him further into the kitchen each night. I’ve moved back up to my bedroom the last 3 nights. He yelps 5-10 minutes and then goes to sleep. Occasionally I put him in the crate during the day (preparing meals, using the bathroom). Am I doing more harm than good because he wasn’t introduced more gradually?
Bring your puppy to the crate for naps and quiet-time breaks so that he can “unwind” from family chaos. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.
My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
Continuing the trend with leaders topping our list of best travel dog crates, MidWest are best known for their top quality metal dog crates. This Midwest Life Stages folding metal dog crate in particular can be used throughout the life of your dog, and it's a great alternative to soft travel dog crates. Normally, it's recommended to buy the crate for regular use as opposed to just travel, and when looking for it, make sure to buy one for your dog's adult size (if you still have a puppy that is). Metal dog crates are good for both plane and car travel if you know how to use them. Some dogs prefer metal crates over soft, but they're not always the best option. A divider panel is included with the crate to adjust its size as your dog grows. This gives the option for the crate to be used for more than one dog, as the size of the cage can be adjusted for each dog.
Crating also has benefits outside the home. A crated dog traveling in a car will have less chance of serious injury in case of an auto accident. If you’re traveling and stay overnight someplace, having your dog in a crate will ease the concerns of your hosts. Your dog will also be more comfortable inside the familiar surroundings of his or her own crate no matter where it’s set up.
Whether you have a new puppy or an adult dog, you want to pick just the right dog kennel. After all, the kennel will serve as a part-time “home” for your dog. You want him to be safe while he’s in it, whether it’s during a time you’re not home or when you’re traveling together. A good dog kennel is sturdy and durable – strong enough that he won’t chew his way out of it while you’re running errands, but comfortable enough for him to feel good while inside. At BestReviews, we can help you find the right dog kennel for your beloved friend. We researched the dog kennel market and selected what we feel to be the very best offerings. We did not accept free samples from manufacturers during our research, because we strive to be completely honest and bias-free. For a quick overview of the best dog kennels, check out the chart above. For more information on dog kennels and how to choose one that’s right for your pet, continue reading this guide.
This is the cutest crate ever. I love the pink color. My dog will even go in here when everyone is home just to chew on her bones or take a nap. A size small perfectly fits a 20 lb Boston/Pug mix. If your dog is an escape artist, however, you might want a different crate because this latch is kind of easy for them to unhinge. My dog has escaped two times, but that was when her separation anxiety was a lot worse, which I think helped catalyze her escape.
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
Continuing the trend with leaders topping our list of best travel dog crates, MidWest are best known for their top quality metal dog crates. This Midwest Life Stages folding metal dog crate in particular can be used throughout the life of your dog, and it's a great alternative to soft travel dog crates. Normally, it's recommended to buy the crate for regular use as opposed to just travel, and when looking for it, make sure to buy one for your dog's adult size (if you still have a puppy that is). Metal dog crates are good for both plane and car travel if you know how to use them. Some dogs prefer metal crates over soft, but they're not always the best option. A divider panel is included with the crate to adjust its size as your dog grows. This gives the option for the crate to be used for more than one dog, as the size of the cage can be adjusted for each dog.

Because your domesticated dog will treat their crate just as a wild dog would treat their den, he will not want to soil their sleeping space. Therefore, you can be sure that, if at all possible, your dog will not have an accident in their crate, so when you let them out of their crate to go outside, he will naturally seize that opportunity to relieve themself. While there are other methods of house training your puppy, this is a very instinctual transition, requiring mainly that you take your puppy out of their crate at reasonable intervals to use the restroom. This way, your puppy will pretty easily, and perceptively, pick up that he is expected to do their business outside, not in.
The best dog kennels should serve multiple purposes for you and your dog. They should be durable and also easy to assemble and to disassemble when on the go, see our dog carriers for options like this. Whether you’re off on your next adventure or having company over for dinner, shop the best dog kennels and dog crates here on Chewy to best suit your needs. In addition to dog crates and furniture, Chewy has low prices on all your dog supplies including dog food, dog treats and more. Trust Chewy, for your online pet supplies.
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