Arf Pets 3 Door Crate with Strap – Essentially the same type as the EliteField's crate, Arf Pets' dog travel crate is a great alternative with a slightly different design. It's a less popular option among pet owners who travel, but it's available in different sizes and several new color schemes. The only reason to buy Art Pets over EliteField is if you prefer their colors or offered sizes, because the price, materials used and the implemented design features are exactly the same as EliteField's.
If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.
Crate training, when done effectively, can be a helpful tool. Not only does it provide your new puppy with a sense of safety and stability, it also provides you, as a new puppy owner, with a way to establish order and rule in your home. Implemented and followed through with correctly, crate training is a win for all parties involved – especially for your puppy.

If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.
Venturing away from standard best travel dog crates, we've now coming into the territory of heavy duty dog cages for travel which is yet to be dominated by one single manufacturer. However, the Variocage is one of the best heavy duty dog travel cages due to its smart design, stylish looks, high quality material and crash tests. These are very expensive travel cages for dogs, but well worth the investment if you're looking something for large dogs and long distance travel. Not only do these heavy and indestructible dog cages look very stylish, but they've been ranked best for crash tests. These travel dog crates are very comfortable for dogs and easy to clean too. In addition, for added security, the Variocage includes a built-in key lock.

Once your puppy accepts the crate as a fact of puppy life, you can move the crate to a more acceptable spot in the house. A place next to your own bed will let the puppy sleep in its own spot but near your familiar smells and presence. That also offers you a more private area to seclude it, when necessary, from activities in the living area or kitchen that might keep your dog overstimulated.
Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.
When measuring the length of your dog, you should begin at the base of the neck and measure to the base of the tail. Add 3 inches to this and that should be the minimum crate length that you should be looking for. To measure their height, simply start at the ground and measure to the top of their shoulders. Add 3 inches to this measurement to get the minimum crate height you should be looking for.
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
Crating also has benefits outside the home. A crated dog traveling in a car will have less chance of serious injury in case of an auto accident. If you’re traveling and stay overnight someplace, having your dog in a crate will ease the concerns of your hosts. Your dog will also be more comfortable inside the familiar surroundings of his or her own crate no matter where it’s set up.

My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!


How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?

Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.


Show it to the dog, let it smell and taste the treat, and then toss it inside the crate and shut the door, with the puppy outside the crate and the treat on the inside. That shows that an absolutely scrumptious puppy treat is inside, out of paw-reach. And after the pup has begged and scratched and whined to get inside, open the door and let it get the toy inside the crate. Allow your pup to chew and enjoy it for five minutes with the door shut and the dog remaining in the crate. Some pups settle down and enjoy their treat with no fanfare. Others throw a fit and want out. So if your puppy fusses let it out, but lock the treat back inside. You’re teaching the dog that wonderful things can be found inside the crate. Most pups learn to tolerate the door shut at least as long as they have something to munch.
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