Researching your options will be the next step, and I've done a ton of legwork for you with the above list of twenty best dog travel crates, listing their specifications and the modes of travel they are best used for. These travel dog crates are all safe, comfortable choices for your canine, but you'll have to find out if they meet the traveling guidelines that you need to follow and pick the right size after measuring your dog.
Does he go pee outside at all for you? If so, be sure to give him lots of praise when he does. Say, “good boy!” and pet him a lot. If there is a pattern to him going potty in his crate, try to change when you take him out or for how long. For example, does he always go in his crate right when you get inside? If so, stay outside a little longer. Does he go 20 minutes after you come inside? Try taking him out again after 20 minutes.

With all of its great features, this heavy duty dog cage is not without its faults, and the main issue is that it's difficult to put together. Unlike metal dog crates like MidWest iCrate, the MIM Safe Variocage dog travel cage needs to be assembled from scratch which takes time, effort and understanding. These dog crates come in 14 changeable sizes to fit most dogs, and they come in four different models. This gives you a better chance at finding a suitable fit for your vehicle or one that will pass the guidelines for the method of transportation that you will be taking.
Sliverylake Heavy Duty Metal Cage – An even cheaper alternative is this heavy duty metal cage from Sliverylake. The design is simpler and it's not as sturdy as either ProSelect of Variocage, but if you don'g have a hyperactive extra large dog, then this may be a better choice considering that you also pay significantly less for it. The standard features will be more than enough.
All of Petmate plastic travel dog crates, including this one, come in a variety of sizes to fit most dog breeds, although you'll be hard pressed to find one for a large breed (mostly, it's for small to medium dogs). The wire doors of these crates lock shut with a chrome squeeze door latch. The crates are shipped as two half shells and are very easy to assemble. They come with no-rust plastic wing nuts. These crates are also equipped with side air vents.
Quick tip: If the measurements are between two crate sizes, always choose the larger size.Once you've measured your dog, you'll know the appropriate size crate to choose and now you're well on your way to choosing the best dog travel crate for your canine companion. Pet stores are full of travel crate options and you can also shop online, but the choices there will be nearly infinite.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help
• Material: Look for items constructed from a lightweight yet durable frame material such as aluminum or steel. Both options are light enough to make carrying and set up simple. These durable metals will also be able to hold up to the wear and tear exerted on a travel carrier. You’ll also need to make special considerations for pets that like to chew.
Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.

Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.
I’ve never crate trained before, this is all new to me. My new puppy pees the bed when I let her sleep with me and she needs to be in the crate while I’m at work for 4 to 5 hours. She likes her crate and wont potty in it, but cries at night. I think she just needs to potty during the night like I do. I’m going to try taking her out every time I go pee and putting her back in. When she stops peeing the my bed at night she can sleep with me. I’ve never had a puppy pee my bed at night before, but she’s wat too small to jump down and up by hersel, and not yet house broken. Other than that she’s great, and this artical isn’t all wrong. Dogs dont like to potty where they sleep and eat, and they are pack animals so they usually sleep together. I feel bad making her sleep alone right now.
This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after. To make matters worse, the packaging materials included styrofoam that must have been damaged in transit. The structural foam had dissintegrated causing a snow storm in the house that was very difficult to vaccuum up because of the static charge. Lastly, the crate pieces were bent when they arrived, so the packaging isn't great for shipping. This further complicated assembly because the hooks that connect the pieces saw the bulk of the damage. My dog doesn't challenge the structural integrity of the kennel, but I would guess an ambitious dog can quickly defeat this enclosure. I would not buy this one again if I could go back. In fact, I am looking for another XXL crate to use for trips so I never have to reassemble this one again... It's just not worth the hassle to return this given the price. … more
My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
The Petmate Two Door dog crate for travel is very easy to clean because it's all plastic and, although they are made with heavy duty materials, they are surprisingly lightweight. These pet travel crates are equipped with tie-down holes in all four corners to make them more stable while traveling. They also include a hole so the door can be secured with zip-ties during travel.
Crating also has benefits outside the home. A crated dog traveling in a car will have less chance of serious injury in case of an auto accident. If you’re traveling and stay overnight someplace, having your dog in a crate will ease the concerns of your hosts. Your dog will also be more comfortable inside the familiar surroundings of his or her own crate no matter where it’s set up.
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