OxGord Rolling Backpack Carrier – This is something a little different for those who aren't happy with standard best travel dog carriers. OxGord's rolling backpack pet carrier is a perfect choice for people looking for something like a dog backpack carrier but suitable for long distance travel. It's very durable, has wheels, is fairly easy to store but will not collapse completely.

I am using this cage currently for 2 of my 4 dogs, a little tiny 2 pound chihuahua and an 8 pound mix puppy. Sometimes they "share" and sometimes its just for one or the other. They both "fit" with room to spare. It comes with a divider if I want to keep them separate but so far I have not done so. It's too big to use as a housebreaking aid because it leaves them room to "go" without disturbing their natural instincts to keep their den clean but if I wanted to use it for that it could be done by using the divider. I hesitated for a long time about what size to get and this one seems nice, not too big or too small, it is certainly plenty tall for them.

All MidWest Life Stages travel dog crates include handles for easy carrying and a plastic pan for comfort inside the crate so your pup isn't sitting on the metal bars. Metal crates like this one are great because you can see your pet from all angels since there there are no hidden sides. Midwest has seven different sizes for your dog that adjust to his growth and the divider panel is a huge advantage over soft dog travel crates. Overall, metal dog travel crates are the most optimal option for many pet owners, especially those who travel in cars very often.
Plastic crates are maybe not the first choice for an in-home crate as they provide less visibility to the pup that calls it home, however, if you plan to do quite a bit of travel by plane, this is a great option as all airlines require this type of crate to transport your animal. Plastic crates are also great for pups that need a little more security, or for a home that has a higher level of activity (think on-the-go kiddos), as it gives your pup a bit more privacy.
This is a very nice carrier with a top and side door. The top door is not a moon roof. I like the top door--a lot-- because once I catch one of the little monst—I mean cats, I don’t want to have to shove it in the door. I love the drop-a-cat door. It cuts down on my injuries by 90%. The little bugg—, I mean cat, only got me once instead of leaving a full set of scratch marks on my hands and arms.
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.

This is the cutest crate ever. I love the pink color. My dog will even go in here when everyone is home just to chew on her bones or take a nap. A size small perfectly fits a 20 lb Boston/Pug mix. If your dog is an escape artist, however, you might want a different crate because this latch is kind of easy for them to unhinge. My dog has escaped two times, but that was when her separation anxiety was a lot worse, which I think helped catalyze her escape.
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
With all of its great features, this heavy duty dog cage is not without its faults, and the main issue is that it's difficult to put together. Unlike metal dog crates like MidWest iCrate, the MIM Safe Variocage dog travel cage needs to be assembled from scratch which takes time, effort and understanding. These dog crates come in 14 changeable sizes to fit most dogs, and they come in four different models. This gives you a better chance at finding a suitable fit for your vehicle or one that will pass the guidelines for the method of transportation that you will be taking.
I read all of the positive and negative reviews before ordering this crate with cover. It was packaged well. The instructions were clear and set up took 10-15 minutes. It is really roomy and my 73lb Bulldog went right in. The wood looks great and the cage is strong. I use only the front gate, so I put zip-ties on the side door latches and top opening, although I don't think it really needs it.

Crating also has benefits outside the home. A crated dog traveling in a car will have less chance of serious injury in case of an auto accident. If you’re traveling and stay overnight someplace, having your dog in a crate will ease the concerns of your hosts. Your dog will also be more comfortable inside the familiar surroundings of his or her own crate no matter where it’s set up.


There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
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