How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?

Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.


The perfect crate should be just large enough for a puppy to go inside, turn around, and lie down to sleep, but not so large that your dog can soil one side of the crate and sleep on the other side. Of course, puppies grow. So take into account your pup’s future adult size before investing in a pricey dog crate. Large crates are available with partitions for you to “shrink” to puppy size, and then enlarge the area as your puppy grows. You can also purchase an adult-size crate, and insert a barrier like a plastic storage box that shrinks the space to puppy proportions until your pet grows into its crate. 
Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.
It was a little more complicated to put together than the smaller crates, but it's perfect. My lab has to have cruciate ligament surgery and his current crate is too small with the cone. It is large enough for him to freely move around and for me to actually go in there with him to give him attention. It's big and takes up a fair amount of space, but I am very happy with the purchase. Hopefully, it will minimize the difficulty of the 12 week recovery for an active dog!

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My friends went to Hawaii and left me their dog. Everything was ok until I didn’t receive an important call that I should have gone to another city. It was a catastrophe! I was searching for a travel crate knowing nothing about dogs, crates and travelling with them. But the first one I’ve bought was quite ok, I know that my friends still use it. And now I have a dog too and try to find something really good.
Variocages heavy dog travel cage is not a popular option, mostly due to its large price tag and the fact that very few dogs and pet owners need such type of travel crate. That said, these indestructible dog cages look like something from Jurassic Park and are the only crates that are rated using government safety standards for the protection they provide during accidents. That means that they passed the front, rear and rollover crash tests. Also, all models include an emergency escape as an additional safety measure. This crate really is a must have for any dog owner that frequently travels with their pet in the car.

All of Petmate plastic travel dog crates, including this one, come in a variety of sizes to fit most dog breeds, although you'll be hard pressed to find one for a large breed (mostly, it's for small to medium dogs). The wire doors of these crates lock shut with a chrome squeeze door latch. The crates are shipped as two half shells and are very easy to assemble. They come with no-rust plastic wing nuts. These crates are also equipped with side air vents.


There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
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