How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
Your dog’s safety is in jeopardy when she is not strapped into your car in some way. If you were to get into an accident, your dog would likely be thrown from the vehicle. Secured safely in a crate or harness, however, your dog will stay in the car in the case of a collision. A crate can also offer some protection from impact and debris. You love your dog, and you don’t want to take the risk that she could be injured or killed while you remain safely in your seat, held in by your seatbelt.
Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo too! Both very well behaved when being supervised. Only go in crates when we are not home which isn’t often. Have a dog with anxiety? These crates have 3 latches. And the metal is thicker, heavy. Seems very well built. Takes two people, this things HEAVY. Pain in the butt to put together but worth every dollar. Love them. … more
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
When measuring the length of your dog, you should begin at the base of the neck and measure to the base of the tail. Add 3 inches to this and that should be the minimum crate length that you should be looking for. To measure their height, simply start at the ground and measure to the top of their shoulders. Add 3 inches to this measurement to get the minimum crate height you should be looking for.
On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
Depending on your dog, you will want to pick a crate that best suits your needs. For a smaller dog, pick a soft-sided crate or a car seat that fit them better. For a larger, stronger dog, picking a hard sided or wire crate is a better choice. All of the crates listed in this article are some of the best of their types, and there should be a choice for any dog on the list. Always remember to add beds, pads, or calming aids when picking a crate, and measure your dog first before trying to get them sized for a crate. If you are still unsure, try to get a crate that you know your dog can stand up and turn around in, as previously stated, and make sure that it is not oversized for your dog, either. Hopefully, this article will give you all the insight you need on which dog crate will be the best for you and your dog.
Variocages heavy dog travel cage is not a popular option, mostly due to its large price tag and the fact that very few dogs and pet owners need such type of travel crate. That said, these indestructible dog cages look like something from Jurassic Park and are the only crates that are rated using government safety standards for the protection they provide during accidents. That means that they passed the front, rear and rollover crash tests. Also, all models include an emergency escape as an additional safety measure. This crate really is a must have for any dog owner that frequently travels with their pet in the car.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.

Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.
Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.
Create a cozy space for your dog at home and on-the-go. With large dog crates, small carriers and everything in between, we make living – and traveling – with your best friend simple. Crate-training your puppy while they're young can help avoid destructive behaviors, potty accidents and separation anxiety when you provide them a secure crate with access to food, water, and safe toys. Shop our collection at PetSmart to find the latest dog carriers and enclosures, as well as durable and versatile dog cages, crates and kennels.
The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight collapsible crate is composed of heavy-duty Ballistic Nylon and Mesh with bendable yet sturdy built-in flexible extenders that hook and loop into place and hold up the 2 outer mesh expandable sides. Fully expands on both sides and collapses and folds. Perfect ...  More + Product Details Close
We purchase this for our German Shepard for when we are not home. He now a little over a year and still not able to be out when not home. This size is huge and makes me feel better when I am at work and he is in his cage. He is comfortable in it with his bed and all his toys. He has tons of room to move around, straight up straight and comfortable. He is bigger than he would probably need but he is happy and make me happy that he has room to play if wanted to. Love the two doors so can be put in a location. Assembly was pretty easy. Need two people to go fast by I did by my self and used a chair to assist me. Would buy again if need be.
ProSelect Empire Cage – For a significantly less money, ProSelect is a decent alternative to Variocage if you're going for a short distance car travel and it's been rated as one of the best heavy duty cages for dogs. It's not crash tested, isn't as stylish or as heavy and large as Variocage, but they will be an appropriate choice for most pet owners with medium to extra large dog breeds.
Our 48-inch XXL Dog Crates accommodate dogs weighing 91-150 pounds. See dog crates size guide if you are unsure if the XXlarge dog crate is appropriate for you pet. Manufacturers of dog crates have their own measure of Large, XL, XXL crates - please check the dimension of our XXL dog crates when making a purchase. See all dog crate sizes on our Dog Crates and Dog Cages page.  
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.
Another leader in its category, PetPeppy's premium airline approved dog travel crate is visually appealing, stylish and comes with a ton of features that makes it easy to carry your dog. It only comes in a single color (black with red accent) and have huge mesh windows on each side that will give your dog lots of ventilation. It's expandable that allows for tons of extra storage. As with all other pet carriers, this best dog travel crate doesn't need any assembly and it somewhat collapsible if you need to store it away. You won't need any tools for this one either.
Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 
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