Now that said, it sounds like your pup does not like being crated for long periods of time. This is his way of letting you know. A couple hours here and there is not what they want. They want it all, to roam your home for hours and hours. Sorry. My oldest told me that she read dogs will mess their crate because they know you have to clean it and they will be taken out (which is why i left my dog in the crate while I cleaned it). They will also step in their crap because they know they will get a bath..a sure way of getting out and getting some affection, since you will be obliged to hold and scrub the dog. It is frustrating to say the least. And yes after the poop we had to bathe him. My husband did that, while I cleaned the cage.
Never leave a puppy in his crate all day; he needs several bathroom breaks, as well as play and feeding times. Even though he won’t want to soil his sleeping area, if he is in there for extremely long stretches, he just might. (He can’t help it!) And if he does, it is because his owner has neglected his responsibility, not because the dog has misbehaved.

Once your puppy accepts the crate as a fact of puppy life, you can move the crate to a more acceptable spot in the house. A place next to your own bed will let the puppy sleep in its own spot but near your familiar smells and presence. That also offers you a more private area to seclude it, when necessary, from activities in the living area or kitchen that might keep your dog overstimulated.


This is a very nice carrier with a top and side door. The top door is not a moon roof. I like the top door--a lot-- because once I catch one of the little monst—I mean cats, I don’t want to have to shove it in the door. I love the drop-a-cat door. It cuts down on my injuries by 90%. The little bugg—, I mean cat, only got me once instead of leaving a full set of scratch marks on my hands and arms.

Does he go pee outside at all for you? If so, be sure to give him lots of praise when he does. Say, “good boy!” and pet him a lot. If there is a pattern to him going potty in his crate, try to change when you take him out or for how long. For example, does he always go in his crate right when you get inside? If so, stay outside a little longer. Does he go 20 minutes after you come inside? Try taking him out again after 20 minutes.

I had done a lot of research before I decided to purchase this crate, so I had read the reviews about packaging. The outside of the box was in good condition, but the inside packaging and crate itself was a mess! Styrofoam was everywhere. And by the time we finally got it untangled and put together, even the dogs were covered in it! The box didnt prevent the crate from becoming bent and tangled. With some tools and a strong hand, it took 2 of us an hour to put together. The crate itself is a little bent and the side door isn't very secure, but we used zip ties and all is well. Overall, we are pleased with our purchase.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.
If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.
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How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?


As a pet parent, one of the first purchases you will likely make is a dog crate. The reason is simple—they offer your canine a cozy retreat that’s convenient and in some cases, able to be transported anywhere! With proper training, dog crates can help your furry pal control their bladder and keep them from chewing furniture. But when it comes to knowing which crate is best, that can be tough. To help, we’re going to tell you all about wire dog crates so you can make an informed decision for your canine.
If you and your dog are taking a trip by vehicle, finding the best travel dog crate that is suitable and fits your car is actually an easy task, since majority of these travel carriers are designed for cars first. If you are both travelling by plane, it is a good idea to be aware of the airline crate policies before purchasing one of your own, as airlines require specific dimensions and rules for travelling with pets in crates. Fortunately, some of the pet carriers are already airline approved, and others are easy to get accepted.
Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.
Sherpa Original Deluxe Carrier – Sherpa has been manufacturing carriers for decades, and their original deluxe travel dog carrier is easily the best one of standard dog travel carrier options. It's more stylish, the quality of materials used and the design itself is higher than that of PetPeppy or AmazonBasics, but it's more expensive than Amazon's pet carrier and it doesn't offer the extra features that PetPeppy does.
New World Folding Metal Crate – A decent alternative to MidWest metal crates is this from New World. As with all metal dog cages, there's little difference in their design, however, MidWest crates are all superior, which explains their insane popularity among pet owners. The only reason to choose New World crate is if you want less features in your dog crate (possibly for less complications?)
One dog owner said she actually layed on the ground becide her whining pup. I was thinking that if all you concerned dog owners spent half as much time love and concern with humans as you do with your pets this world might be a better place. Maybe more respect for others and not so much crime. Who knows….maybe humans might like the love from other humans.
I had done a lot of research before I decided to purchase this crate, so I had read the reviews about packaging. The outside of the box was in good condition, but the inside packaging and crate itself was a mess! Styrofoam was everywhere. And by the time we finally got it untangled and put together, even the dogs were covered in it! The box didnt prevent the crate from becoming bent and tangled. With some tools and a strong hand, it took 2 of us an hour to put together. The crate itself is a little bent and the side door isn't very secure, but we used zip ties and all is well. Overall, we are pleased with our purchase.
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Your dog’s safety is in jeopardy when she is not strapped into your car in some way. If you were to get into an accident, your dog would likely be thrown from the vehicle. Secured safely in a crate or harness, however, your dog will stay in the car in the case of a collision. A crate can also offer some protection from impact and debris. You love your dog, and you don’t want to take the risk that she could be injured or killed while you remain safely in your seat, held in by your seatbelt.
I have a friend, who doesn’t have such crate and thinks that is it’s soft and made from a textile it’ll be always dirty and wet. But I’m here just to say that if you’re thinking in such way, you’re absolutely wrong! Just look at the crates made from a waterproof material and which are comfortable for your pet to stay not only indoors but in a different transport too.
Keeping your specific needs, preferences, and details about your pet’s size in mind while looking at different options is an easy way to be sure you’ll pick the perfect travel crate for your dog. There are so many wonderful options, and you are sure to find a soft sided crate that keeps your furry companion happier and safer. Please leave us a comment below with your favorite travel crate options or a fun story about traveling with your pet.
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.
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