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Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo too! Both very well behaved when being supervised. Only go in crates when we are not home which isn’t often. Have a dog with anxiety? These crates have 3 latches. And the metal is thicker, heavy. Seems very well built. Takes two people, this things HEAVY. Pain in the butt to put together but worth every dollar. Love them. … more
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 
This carrier is made of a durable luggage-grade nylon outside and is ultra plush polyester inside. A padded shoulder strap and handle are included so that you can easily carry your pup however you like. The bedding that comes with this crate is washable, and the foam liner is water-resistant, so you know you will have this crate until your pup is grown and much longer.
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
Everila Fold/Carry Extra Large Extra Tall Two Door Dog Crate Cat Cage w/Divider. Afghan, Alaskan Malamute, Anatolian Shepherd, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bloodhound, Bouvier Des Flandres, Briard, Bullmastiff, Collie, Doberman Pinscher, Dogue De Bordeaux, German Shepherd, Giant Schnauzer, Gordon Setter, Greyhound, Komondor, Kuvasz, Old English Sheepdog, Otterhound, Rottweiler, Samoyed, Siberian Husky, Weimaraner.

We purchase this for our German Shepard for when we are not home. He now a little over a year and still not able to be out when not home. This size is huge and makes me feel better when I am at work and he is in his cage. He is comfortable in it with his bed and all his toys. He has tons of room to move around, straight up straight and comfortable. He is bigger than he would probably need but he is happy and make me happy that he has room to play if wanted to. Love the two doors so can be put in a location. Assembly was pretty easy. Need two people to go fast by I did by my self and used a chair to assist me. Would buy again if need be.
If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.
On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!

I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
Does he go pee outside at all for you? If so, be sure to give him lots of praise when he does. Say, “good boy!” and pet him a lot. If there is a pattern to him going potty in his crate, try to change when you take him out or for how long. For example, does he always go in his crate right when you get inside? If so, stay outside a little longer. Does he go 20 minutes after you come inside? Try taking him out again after 20 minutes.

I have a boxer who is 8 weeks old. We are crate training her. She is fine in the crate eats her meals in there goes in by herself when she’s tired at night however it’s totally different. The first 2 nights were fine but night 3 and 4 she just keeps whining. If I leave her there she doesn’t settle an pushes hard against the bottom of the door bending it. We have tried having someone sleep next to the crate but it did help. What do I do? I’m very tired
Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.

This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after. To make matters worse, the packaging materials included styrofoam that must have been damaged in transit. The structural foam had dissintegrated causing a snow storm in the house that was very difficult to vaccuum up because of the static charge. Lastly, the crate pieces were bent when they arrived, so the packaging isn't great for shipping. This further complicated assembly because the hooks that connect the pieces saw the bulk of the damage. My dog doesn't challenge the structural integrity of the kennel, but I would guess an ambitious dog can quickly defeat this enclosure. I would not buy this one again if I could go back. In fact, I am looking for another XXL crate to use for trips so I never have to reassemble this one again... It's just not worth the hassle to return this given the price. … more


tether the dog to you when in the house, or section off a room or play area. this way you will be able to see him and get outside if he is looking like he needs to go. when you take him out to potty, give him 5-10 minutes. if he doesn’t go crate him for 15-30 min, then try again. lots of praise and extra treats when he goes. you won’t be crating all the time, just until he goes potty outside, then you housed be safe to tether him to you inside until next go around
We purchased this crate as an economical way to move two cats across country. We're currently preparing to be moved by the military from the Raleigh, NC area to Las Vegas, NV. The military will move our house hold goods but not our vehicles or pets, which leaves us forced to move the cats by car and SUV. After researching airline tickets to fly the cats, we were looking at nearly $1,000 to move them. For this crate at less than $100, we're now looking at only a fraction of the cost.
When measuring the length of your dog, you should begin at the base of the neck and measure to the base of the tail. Add 3 inches to this and that should be the minimum crate length that you should be looking for. To measure their height, simply start at the ground and measure to the top of their shoulders. Add 3 inches to this measurement to get the minimum crate height you should be looking for.
My family usually travel by car and our dog is very active every time, so we’ve decided to buy her own home not to disturb my husband from driving. We came to decision very fast and bought The 2Pet foldable Dog Crate because of its design and lightness. Since we got it delivered we mage 2 long road trips and didn’t have any problems with this crate. Our dog was very calm sitting here.
After having this crate for two months I've come to the conclusion that this is AWESOME. I am buying two more... one for each dog. It is easy to store (folds flat), transport (MUCH easier to set up in a SUV or car than one of those metal crates), carry (the handle is nice), and clean (take off the cover; wash, dry, put back on easily and there are no issues with wear and tear from the W/D as of yet).
Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet. … more
Variocages heavy dog travel cage is not a popular option, mostly due to its large price tag and the fact that very few dogs and pet owners need such type of travel crate. That said, these indestructible dog cages look like something from Jurassic Park and are the only crates that are rated using government safety standards for the protection they provide during accidents. That means that they passed the front, rear and rollover crash tests. Also, all models include an emergency escape as an additional safety measure. This crate really is a must have for any dog owner that frequently travels with their pet in the car.
The perfect crate should be just large enough for a puppy to go inside, turn around, and lie down to sleep, but not so large that your dog can soil one side of the crate and sleep on the other side. Of course, puppies grow. So take into account your pup’s future adult size before investing in a pricey dog crate. Large crates are available with partitions for you to “shrink” to puppy size, and then enlarge the area as your puppy grows. You can also purchase an adult-size crate, and insert a barrier like a plastic storage box that shrinks the space to puppy proportions until your pet grows into its crate. 
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