I have a friend, who doesn’t have such crate and thinks that is it’s soft and made from a textile it’ll be always dirty and wet. But I’m here just to say that if you’re thinking in such way, you’re absolutely wrong! Just look at the crates made from a waterproof material and which are comfortable for your pet to stay not only indoors but in a different transport too.
Most dogs love to ride in the car. The wind rushing by carries all kinds of interesting smells that your dog just can’t take in quickly enough, while every stop gives your dog a chance to take in an interesting scene. Add to this the fact that usually going in the car means your dog is going to a fun destination, and it makes perfect sense that being in the car would be a very exciting thing for your dog.
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
The Variocage is more of a machine than just a crate. Although it may have a slightly off-putting appearance, this powerful crate is designed to take the harshest punishment imaginable without a scratch. With hydraulic locks, thick metal bars, and even an emergency escape hatch, this crate is an impressive bit of handiwork. It has been proven sturdy in all different types of crash tests, and comes in sizes for any size dog.
Because your domesticated dog will treat their crate just as a wild dog would treat their den, he will not want to soil their sleeping space. Therefore, you can be sure that, if at all possible, your dog will not have an accident in their crate, so when you let them out of their crate to go outside, he will naturally seize that opportunity to relieve themself. While there are other methods of house training your puppy, this is a very instinctual transition, requiring mainly that you take your puppy out of their crate at reasonable intervals to use the restroom. This way, your puppy will pretty easily, and perceptively, pick up that he is expected to do their business outside, not in.
Crate training, when done effectively, can be a helpful tool. Not only does it provide your new puppy with a sense of safety and stability, it also provides you, as a new puppy owner, with a way to establish order and rule in your home. Implemented and followed through with correctly, crate training is a win for all parties involved – especially for your puppy.
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
The best dog crates and dog kennels are made to comfortably fit the size of your pup. And they’re great dog travel supplies and dog potty training supplies to go along with them too. Picking the right kennel for your dog can make all the difference. The best crates become your dog’s den. And a dog crate can also help reduce the amount of accidents around the house as well as general separation anxiety symptoms. His crate can become a place where he feels a sense of security, solitude and peace. It can be a good idea to add toys and a fluffy pet bed for added relaxation. There are several types of crates that can be used including plastic dog crates, soft-sided dog crates, wooden dog crates, fabric dog crates, and metal dog pens. Chewy also carries different products to make your pup more comfortable in their crate including crate mats as well as crate covers.
I am using this cage currently for 2 of my 4 dogs, a little tiny 2 pound chihuahua and an 8 pound mix puppy. Sometimes they "share" and sometimes its just for one or the other. They both "fit" with room to spare. It comes with a divider if I want to keep them separate but so far I have not done so. It's too big to use as a housebreaking aid because it leaves them room to "go" without disturbing their natural instincts to keep their den clean but if I wanted to use it for that it could be done by using the divider. I hesitated for a long time about what size to get and this one seems nice, not too big or too small, it is certainly plenty tall for them.

Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 


We purchased this crate as an economical way to move two cats across country. We're currently preparing to be moved by the military from the Raleigh, NC area to Las Vegas, NV. The military will move our house hold goods but not our vehicles or pets, which leaves us forced to move the cats by car and SUV. After researching airline tickets to fly the cats, we were looking at nearly $1,000 to move them. For this crate at less than $100, we're now looking at only a fraction of the cost.

Still, some puppies may have a harder time adjusting to the crate than others. Another common mistake is to expect your pup to love the crate right away. If your new pet is really crate-averse, try a new type of crate. Some dogs may prefer wire crates so they can still see their environment, while others may be the exact opposite. Also, try putting the crate in a different place. Some dogs may prefer their crate in the center of the family action while others might like it in a quieter corner of the house.

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