I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate with E-coating finish is built for both durability and your pet's safety. Lucky Dog crates come with a divider panel carrying handle removable crate tray and clip-on rubber feet to protect the floor. Conveniently collapsible for easy transport and storage a Lucky ...  More + Product Details Close
Another leader in its category, PetPeppy's premium airline approved dog travel crate is visually appealing, stylish and comes with a ton of features that makes it easy to carry your dog. It only comes in a single color (black with red accent) and have huge mesh windows on each side that will give your dog lots of ventilation. It's expandable that allows for tons of extra storage. As with all other pet carriers, this best dog travel crate doesn't need any assembly and it somewhat collapsible if you need to store it away. You won't need any tools for this one either.
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.
I am using this cage currently for 2 of my 4 dogs, a little tiny 2 pound chihuahua and an 8 pound mix puppy. Sometimes they "share" and sometimes its just for one or the other. They both "fit" with room to spare. It comes with a divider if I want to keep them separate but so far I have not done so. It's too big to use as a housebreaking aid because it leaves them room to "go" without disturbing their natural instincts to keep their den clean but if I wanted to use it for that it could be done by using the divider. I hesitated for a long time about what size to get and this one seems nice, not too big or too small, it is certainly plenty tall for them.
If your pup begins whining at this stage, it could be a sign that you’ve moved too fast. Return to a length of time where he’s comfortable without whining and move forward from there. If he does whine, do not let your dog out unless he stops or he will begin to associate whining with being let out. This is not a habit you want to start or perpetuate.
I have a boxer who is 8 weeks old. We are crate training her. She is fine in the crate eats her meals in there goes in by herself when she’s tired at night however it’s totally different. The first 2 nights were fine but night 3 and 4 she just keeps whining. If I leave her there she doesn’t settle an pushes hard against the bottom of the door bending it. We have tried having someone sleep next to the crate but it did help. What do I do? I’m very tired
How big is your crate compared to the dog? Typically dogs will not use the bathroom where they sleep if it means no matter where in the crate they go it will be touching them. If you have a crate that allows the dog to sit and lay down a decent bit away from it’s poo then it wont care and it will use the potty in the crate. Make sure the crate is the right size for the dog or at least get big fluffy blankets and pillows to block off a large portion of the crate and make sort of a wall so that if she does go to the bathroom it will be right in her face or on her if she moves an inch.
EliteField is one of the most popular dog crate manufacturers who won hearts of pet owners through low pricing and high quality materials. Their 3-door folding crate is the first of two soft sided crates to make the list of best dog travel crates due to great balance between travel-friendliness, features and ergonomics. Typically, when you put your pet in a crate to travel you want to be sure the crate is sturdy and won't collapse on your pet. However, if your dog will be in your care at all times, a soft crate may be the most appropriate.
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.
Researching your options will be the next step, and I've done a ton of legwork for you with the above list of twenty best dog travel crates, listing their specifications and the modes of travel they are best used for. These travel dog crates are all safe, comfortable choices for your canine, but you'll have to find out if they meet the traveling guidelines that you need to follow and pick the right size after measuring your dog.
No matter which crate type suits you or your pup best, you’ll want to make sure that your dog has enough room to stand up and turn around in their home, but not so much room that they can soil their cage on one side, and sleep on the other, as that would negate any progress you make on the house training front. While a plastic crate would likely require you to continually upgrade as your pup grows, newer wire, metal cages are customizable with an included, movable divider, so the larger space you buy for them as a pup will also fit them as an adult.
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.

As pets become more like family members, it has become more common to bring them with on trips rather than leaving them at home or boarding them. The quality of soft travel crates has improved steadily in recent years. As a result, the market has been inundated with a vast array of crates from basic models to those that have tons of exciting features.


Wire, metal crates are a top pick for crate training for several reasons: Their mesh-like, collapsible structure makes them easy to disassemble and transport, and, when constructed, provides a high level of visibility and ventilation for your pup while in the crate. Like plastic crates, metal, wire crates are also easy to clean out should your pup have an accident in their home. Sturdy and often escape proof, these crates make a great option for growing dogs as you can purchase a larger size and easily close off the extra space with a divider while they’re smaller, removing it or moving it as they grow.
Everila Fold/Carry Extra Large Extra Tall Two Door Dog Crate Cat Cage w/Divider. Afghan, Alaskan Malamute, Anatolian Shepherd, Bernese Mountain Dog, Bloodhound, Bouvier Des Flandres, Briard, Bullmastiff, Collie, Doberman Pinscher, Dogue De Bordeaux, German Shepherd, Giant Schnauzer, Gordon Setter, Greyhound, Komondor, Kuvasz, Old English Sheepdog, Otterhound, Rottweiler, Samoyed, Siberian Husky, Weimaraner.
There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
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