My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
• Material: Look for items constructed from a lightweight yet durable frame material such as aluminum or steel. Both options are light enough to make carrying and set up simple. These durable metals will also be able to hold up to the wear and tear exerted on a travel carrier. You’ll also need to make special considerations for pets that like to chew.
Petego Pet Tube Car Kennel – And for something completely different, if you don't have an extra large dog who needs an indestructible cage but rather looking for something to fit multiple dogs at the back of your car, this may be a great alternative. This pet tube travel car kennel from Petego will be much cheaper and look substantially better in your car, and it also folds.
My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
This is the cutest crate ever. I love the pink color. My dog will even go in here when everyone is home just to chew on her bones or take a nap. A size small perfectly fits a 20 lb Boston/Pug mix. If your dog is an escape artist, however, you might want a different crate because this latch is kind of easy for them to unhinge. My dog has escaped two times, but that was when her separation anxiety was a lot worse, which I think helped catalyze her escape.

I have a rat terrier puppy and wanted to find a quality and reasonably priced kennel for her to begin her crate training, and for use for travel when we make our frequent road trips to visit extended family. Our puppy is expected to be approximately 35lbs, so I purchased the MEDIUM size because I wanted a crate that would also be able ... full review
Or choose a crate that’s made for life at home. Dogs are den animals by nature; most of them appreciate their own personal space where they can rest and regroup. The best dog crates satisfy this natural inclination to hunker down, without making your living room look like a dog kennel. Crafted with a keen eye for aesthetics, our crates come in designs that can live in harmony with your décor. Browse our collection and find the crate that’s right for your dog.

I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.


This is the cutest crate ever. I love the pink color. My dog will even go in here when everyone is home just to chew on her bones or take a nap. A size small perfectly fits a 20 lb Boston/Pug mix. If your dog is an escape artist, however, you might want a different crate because this latch is kind of easy for them to unhinge. My dog has escaped two times, but that was when her separation anxiety was a lot worse, which I think helped catalyze her escape.

Aspen Pet Pet Porter Plastic Kennel – This is a great alternative to Petmate's best dog travel crate because Aspen Pet offers larger sizes than Petmate ever has, with dogs up to 90-100 lbs. You still can't fit a very large breed here, but medium dogs won't have any problems, provided you can pick them up. Aspen Pet travel crate is, however, more than twice as expensive due to large size.
No matter which crate type suits you or your pup best, you’ll want to make sure that your dog has enough room to stand up and turn around in their home, but not so much room that they can soil their cage on one side, and sleep on the other, as that would negate any progress you make on the house training front. While a plastic crate would likely require you to continually upgrade as your pup grows, newer wire, metal cages are customizable with an included, movable divider, so the larger space you buy for them as a pup will also fit them as an adult.

Once you’ve decided that crate training is for you, and which crate suits your canine companion best, it’s time to look at the actual process of crate training your pup. While the length of time it takes to crate train depends on your individual animal, his or her attitude, age, and past experiences, one thing’s for sure: you always want your dog to associate the crate with something pleasant. And even with the best dogs, baby steps are the best way to make this happen.
Choose a well-ventilated crate that is large enough for your puppy to stand up, lie down, and turn around. Remember that your puppy’s crate will have to grow as he does, so purchase a crate that is appropriate for your dog’s expected full-grown size, and use a divider to make the crate smaller for the time being. Many crates available at pet-supply stores include dividers.
Wire dog crates are ideal for pets with long coats or those who live in warmer climates. The continuous air flow keeps them cool while the open design allows them to see their surroundings. Wire and metal dog crate sizes range from X-Small, for a max weight of 20 LBS, all the way up to XX-Large, for a max weight of 140 LBS. While it’s good to know your dog’s weight, you can also reference our crate sizing guide to get a better idea of which size works for each breed.
It was a little more complicated to put together than the smaller crates, but it's perfect. My lab has to have cruciate ligament surgery and his current crate is too small with the cone. It is large enough for him to freely move around and for me to actually go in there with him to give him attention. It's big and takes up a fair amount of space, but I am very happy with the purchase. Hopefully, it will minimize the difficulty of the 12 week recovery for an active dog!
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
All MidWest Life Stages travel dog crates include handles for easy carrying and a plastic pan for comfort inside the crate so your pup isn't sitting on the metal bars. Metal crates like this one are great because you can see your pet from all angels since there there are no hidden sides. Midwest has seven different sizes for your dog that adjust to his growth and the divider panel is a huge advantage over soft dog travel crates. Overall, metal dog travel crates are the most optimal option for many pet owners, especially those who travel in cars very often.
Whether you’re preparing for a new pup or creating a secure environment, these pet containment solutions come in handy when house training your dog. Many wire dog crates are equipped with divider panels that allow your pet’s space to grow with them. Getting the correct size plays a huge role in how successful you are with crate training. It may seem like a good idea to buy a large wire dog crate but in actuality, your pet may use one side as their bedroom and the other as a bathroom. By providing the right amount of space, your canine is less likely to soil their resting spot.
Wire dog crates are ideal for pets with long coats or those who live in warmer climates. The continuous air flow keeps them cool while the open design allows them to see their surroundings. Wire and metal dog crate sizes range from X-Small, for a max weight of 20 LBS, all the way up to XX-Large, for a max weight of 140 LBS. While it’s good to know your dog’s weight, you can also reference our crate sizing guide to get a better idea of which size works for each breed.

The perfect crate should be just large enough for a puppy to go inside, turn around, and lie down to sleep, but not so large that your dog can soil one side of the crate and sleep on the other side. Of course, puppies grow. So take into account your pup’s future adult size before investing in a pricey dog crate. Large crates are available with partitions for you to “shrink” to puppy size, and then enlarge the area as your puppy grows. You can also purchase an adult-size crate, and insert a barrier like a plastic storage box that shrinks the space to puppy proportions until your pet grows into its crate. 
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