Because your domesticated dog will treat their crate just as a wild dog would treat their den, he will not want to soil their sleeping space. Therefore, you can be sure that, if at all possible, your dog will not have an accident in their crate, so when you let them out of their crate to go outside, he will naturally seize that opportunity to relieve themself. While there are other methods of house training your puppy, this is a very instinctual transition, requiring mainly that you take your puppy out of their crate at reasonable intervals to use the restroom. This way, your puppy will pretty easily, and perceptively, pick up that he is expected to do their business outside, not in.
Whether you have a new puppy or an adult dog, you want to pick just the right dog kennel. After all, the kennel will serve as a part-time “home” for your dog. You want him to be safe while he’s in it, whether it’s during a time you’re not home or when you’re traveling together. A good dog kennel is sturdy and durable – strong enough that he won’t chew his way out of it while you’re running errands, but comfortable enough for him to feel good while inside. At BestReviews, we can help you find the right dog kennel for your beloved friend. We researched the dog kennel market and selected what we feel to be the very best offerings. We did not accept free samples from manufacturers during our research, because we strive to be completely honest and bias-free. For a quick overview of the best dog kennels, check out the chart above. For more information on dog kennels and how to choose one that’s right for your pet, continue reading this guide.
Show it to the dog, let it smell and taste the treat, and then toss it inside the crate and shut the door, with the puppy outside the crate and the treat on the inside. That shows that an absolutely scrumptious puppy treat is inside, out of paw-reach. And after the pup has begged and scratched and whined to get inside, open the door and let it get the toy inside the crate. Allow your pup to chew and enjoy it for five minutes with the door shut and the dog remaining in the crate. Some pups settle down and enjoy their treat with no fanfare. Others throw a fit and want out. So if your puppy fusses let it out, but lock the treat back inside. You’re teaching the dog that wonderful things can be found inside the crate. Most pups learn to tolerate the door shut at least as long as they have something to munch.

Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.
The best dog crates and dog kennels are made to comfortably fit the size of your pup. And they’re great dog travel supplies and dog potty training supplies to go along with them too. Picking the right kennel for your dog can make all the difference. The best crates become your dog’s den. And a dog crate can also help reduce the amount of accidents around the house as well as general separation anxiety symptoms. His crate can become a place where he feels a sense of security, solitude and peace. It can be a good idea to add toys and a fluffy pet bed for added relaxation. There are several types of crates that can be used including plastic dog crates, soft-sided dog crates, wooden dog crates, fabric dog crates, and metal dog pens. Chewy also carries different products to make your pup more comfortable in their crate including crate mats as well as crate covers.
My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
Now that said, it sounds like your pup does not like being crated for long periods of time. This is his way of letting you know. A couple hours here and there is not what they want. They want it all, to roam your home for hours and hours. Sorry. My oldest told me that she read dogs will mess their crate because they know you have to clean it and they will be taken out (which is why i left my dog in the crate while I cleaned it). They will also step in their crap because they know they will get a bath..a sure way of getting out and getting some affection, since you will be obliged to hold and scrub the dog. It is frustrating to say the least. And yes after the poop we had to bathe him. My husband did that, while I cleaned the cage.

Wire, metal crates are a top pick for crate training for several reasons: Their mesh-like, collapsible structure makes them easy to disassemble and transport, and, when constructed, provides a high level of visibility and ventilation for your pup while in the crate. Like plastic crates, metal, wire crates are also easy to clean out should your pup have an accident in their home. Sturdy and often escape proof, these crates make a great option for growing dogs as you can purchase a larger size and easily close off the extra space with a divider while they’re smaller, removing it or moving it as they grow.

Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.

My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
There is more than one way to keep your dog firmly in one spot. Harnesses offer your dog more freedom, acting more or less as seat belt attachments for your dog. Harnesses do nothing for your upholstery, windows, or door. If you keep your dog firmly in a middle seat you may be able to prevent drooling on the windows and doors, but this won’t protect the upholstery, and your dog may be able to reach into the front seat.
As pets become more like family members, it has become more common to bring them with on trips rather than leaving them at home or boarding them. The quality of soft travel crates has improved steadily in recent years. As a result, the market has been inundated with a vast array of crates from basic models to those that have tons of exciting features.
I broke down and got a pompoo for my 14 yr old daughter. I am getting wonderful help from friends – but very conflicting. One says do not let pup graze – put food in crate – and shut the door. The other says never feed in crate. I tried feeding in crate – but he gets upset – spills food and whines. Now I have a pup who has not eaten and is upset. and I have to wait for the moment that he stops whining to take him out of the crate. I am exhausted and I feel he is in the crate so much already – at night and during the day when I am at work….I want him to enjoy his new family.
I read all of the positive and negative reviews before ordering this crate with cover. It was packaged well. The instructions were clear and set up took 10-15 minutes. It is really roomy and my 73lb Bulldog went right in. The wood looks great and the cage is strong. I use only the front gate, so I put zip-ties on the side door latches and top opening, although I don't think it really needs it.
I have a friend, who doesn’t have such crate and thinks that is it’s soft and made from a textile it’ll be always dirty and wet. But I’m here just to say that if you’re thinking in such way, you’re absolutely wrong! Just look at the crates made from a waterproof material and which are comfortable for your pet to stay not only indoors but in a different transport too.
This carrier is made of a durable luggage-grade nylon outside and is ultra plush polyester inside. A padded shoulder strap and handle are included so that you can easily carry your pup however you like. The bedding that comes with this crate is washable, and the foam liner is water-resistant, so you know you will have this crate until your pup is grown and much longer.

We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
I had done a lot of research before I decided to purchase this crate, so I had read the reviews about packaging. The outside of the box was in good condition, but the inside packaging and crate itself was a mess! Styrofoam was everywhere. And by the time we finally got it untangled and put together, even the dogs were covered in it! The box didnt prevent the crate from becoming bent and tangled. With some tools and a strong hand, it took 2 of us an hour to put together. The crate itself is a little bent and the side door isn't very secure, but we used zip ties and all is well. Overall, we are pleased with our purchase.
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.
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