- Exclusions: Orijen and Acana food & treats; over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; items shipped through white glove delivery or LTL delivery; orders exceeding the maximum weight limit of 300 lbs.; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
MidWest iCrate Folding Metal Dog Crate – The best alternative to Life Stages travel dog crate is another option from the same company, their extremely popular iCrate. With double doors, tons of different sizes, heavy duty latches and carrying handles, this is easily one of the best metal travel dog crates. You will not go wrong with either Life Stages or the iCrate since they offer similar features.
Free Shipping Exclusions: Cat litter, dog litter, ice melter, wild bird food, live fish & rock, aquatic gravel and accents; crickets, live food and frozen food; out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco or Unleashed by Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; items shipped through white glove delivery or LTL delivery; orders exceeding the maximum weight limit of 300 lbs.; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
MidWest iCrate Folding Metal Dog Crate – The best alternative to Life Stages travel dog crate is another option from the same company, their extremely popular iCrate. With double doors, tons of different sizes, heavy duty latches and carrying handles, this is easily one of the best metal travel dog crates. You will not go wrong with either Life Stages or the iCrate since they offer similar features.
Finally, you'll want to be sure to check with the travel agency (if you're using one) and all locations where you will be staying to make sure that both pets and the type of crate you're taking are allowed. Remember to ask if they have unique crate specifications. This is particularly true for airlines, because each airline has their own guidelines, but the same can be said for every bus service, train service, and hotels. Planning ahead could save you from dealing with unnecessary issues during your travels.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!

On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!

Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
ProSelect Empire Cage – For a significantly less money, ProSelect is a decent alternative to Variocage if you're going for a short distance car travel and it's been rated as one of the best heavy duty cages for dogs. It's not crash tested, isn't as stylish or as heavy and large as Variocage, but they will be an appropriate choice for most pet owners with medium to extra large dog breeds.
Bring your puppy to the crate for naps and quiet-time breaks so that he can “unwind” from family chaos. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.
I come home at lunch so she is crated fro 8 am to noon and then again from 1 pm until 3 pm when my son gets home from school. Every day, she has a potty accident (poop) in her crate before I come home at noon. She is a very good pup and loves her crate at night but HATES for me to leave in the morning. I am worried she won’t grow out of pooping in her crate during the day and will continue to be anxious and sad while we are not home. Would it be better for me to leave her in the bathroom with a puppy pads and toys while I go to work since she does well in her crate at night already? I have tried leaving the TV on for her to keep her entertained and feeling less anxious. I have tried leaving the room dark and quiet so she might just sleep. Nothing seems to work. Thanks for any input!

Selecting wire XXL Dog Crates can be overwhelming at first. Start by selecting the number of doors for your XXL dog crate. Consider where the dog cage will be located and if more that 1-door is needed. Will you ever need to relocate the dog crate to another location and if so, will multiple doors be necessary for your dogs cage? This will significantly decrease the number of dog crates for selection. Next determine style, folding, etc. or consider a puppy crate package.
The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate with E-coating finish is built for both durability and your pet's safety. Lucky Dog crates come with a divider panel carrying handle removable crate tray and clip-on rubber feet to protect the floor. Conveniently collapsible for easy transport and storage a Lucky ...  More + Product Details Close
I had this problem with my Chihuahua/Yorkie mixed. I moved her kennel by the back door. The backyard is where she uses the bathroom. I allowed her to stay in the yard for one hour per bathroom break. I monitored her intake. I noticed that after each meal she immediately used the bathroom- doing a number 1 and 2. I would never leave her food out because I wouldn’t be able to monitor her bathroom break. I fed her twice to 3xs a day with plenty of treats for using the bathroom outside. I treated her as soo as she walked back in the house- but that’s only if she actually used the bathroom. I hope this helps. House breaking a puppy can be frustrating.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.

If you have anyone else in your car, they may not appreciate your dog jumping all over their laps to get the best angle on whatever is going on outside of the window. Your dog can quickly turn a pleasant car ride into a very uncomfortable one for your guests. While they may be nice enough to not say anything about it, they may not want to go with you and your dog on your next outing.
Addendum added January 28, 2013: My vet had never noticed these carriers because I had never put one up on the exam table until my last vet visit. She looked at it with interest and totally concurred with my opinion of having a small, but open carrier for my two (panicky) cats. She has seen more than a few overheated pets in too enclosed carriers. Since I live far from the vet I always carry spare towels for the bottoms of the carriers and she found that the "stable floor covering'* I use was an additional comfort feature for my pets long trip to their appointments. (I just ordered the larger size of this carrier for my "Phat Kat" and will donate her previous carrier to our local animal shelter.)
Plastic crates are maybe not the first choice for an in-home crate as they provide less visibility to the pup that calls it home, however, if you plan to do quite a bit of travel by plane, this is a great option as all airlines require this type of crate to transport your animal. Plastic crates are also great for pups that need a little more security, or for a home that has a higher level of activity (think on-the-go kiddos), as it gives your pup a bit more privacy.

Addendum added January 28, 2013: My vet had never noticed these carriers because I had never put one up on the exam table until my last vet visit. She looked at it with interest and totally concurred with my opinion of having a small, but open carrier for my two (panicky) cats. She has seen more than a few overheated pets in too enclosed carriers. Since I live far from the vet I always carry spare towels for the bottoms of the carriers and she found that the "stable floor covering'* I use was an additional comfort feature for my pets long trip to their appointments. (I just ordered the larger size of this carrier for my "Phat Kat" and will donate her previous carrier to our local animal shelter.)
If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.
MidWest iCrate Folding Metal Dog Crate – The best alternative to Life Stages travel dog crate is another option from the same company, their extremely popular iCrate. With double doors, tons of different sizes, heavy duty latches and carrying handles, this is easily one of the best metal travel dog crates. You will not go wrong with either Life Stages or the iCrate since they offer similar features.
Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.

Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.
If you have anyone else in your car, they may not appreciate your dog jumping all over their laps to get the best angle on whatever is going on outside of the window. Your dog can quickly turn a pleasant car ride into a very uncomfortable one for your guests. While they may be nice enough to not say anything about it, they may not want to go with you and your dog on your next outing.
No matter which crate type suits you or your pup best, you’ll want to make sure that your dog has enough room to stand up and turn around in their home, but not so much room that they can soil their cage on one side, and sleep on the other, as that would negate any progress you make on the house training front. While a plastic crate would likely require you to continually upgrade as your pup grows, newer wire, metal cages are customizable with an included, movable divider, so the larger space you buy for them as a pup will also fit them as an adult.
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