I broke down and got a pompoo for my 14 yr old daughter. I am getting wonderful help from friends – but very conflicting. One says do not let pup graze – put food in crate – and shut the door. The other says never feed in crate. I tried feeding in crate – but he gets upset – spills food and whines. Now I have a pup who has not eaten and is upset. and I have to wait for the moment that he stops whining to take him out of the crate. I am exhausted and I feel he is in the crate so much already – at night and during the day when I am at work….I want him to enjoy his new family.
Create a cozy space for your dog at home and on-the-go. With large dog crates, small carriers and everything in between, we make living – and traveling – with your best friend simple. Crate-training your puppy while they're young can help avoid destructive behaviors, potty accidents and separation anxiety when you provide them a secure crate with access to food, water, and safe toys. Shop our collection at PetSmart to find the latest dog carriers and enclosures, as well as durable and versatile dog cages, crates and kennels.

I have a friend, who doesn’t have such crate and thinks that is it’s soft and made from a textile it’ll be always dirty and wet. But I’m here just to say that if you’re thinking in such way, you’re absolutely wrong! Just look at the crates made from a waterproof material and which are comfortable for your pet to stay not only indoors but in a different transport too.
If you and your dog are taking a trip by vehicle, finding the best travel dog crate that is suitable and fits your car is actually an easy task, since majority of these travel carriers are designed for cars first. If you are both travelling by plane, it is a good idea to be aware of the airline crate policies before purchasing one of your own, as airlines require specific dimensions and rules for travelling with pets in crates. Fortunately, some of the pet carriers are already airline approved, and others are easy to get accepted.
I recently adopted a 7 week old German Shepherd puppy and want to crate train him. I take him out every couple of hours to use the restroom and play with him. When I take him outside he’ll use the restroom and we praise him. However, as soon as we bring him in the house to play he eliminates randomly. They are little spots of pee. I suggested to my family that we only play with our pup outside so we don’t have these accidents. I’m afraid I’m confusing him, because if he’s not in the crate he’s outside. I don’t have experience crate training or house training.
Crate training, when done effectively, can be a helpful tool. Not only does it provide your new puppy with a sense of safety and stability, it also provides you, as a new puppy owner, with a way to establish order and rule in your home. Implemented and followed through with correctly, crate training is a win for all parties involved – especially for your puppy.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.
Sliverylake Heavy Duty Metal Cage – An even cheaper alternative is this heavy duty metal cage from Sliverylake. The design is simpler and it's not as sturdy as either ProSelect of Variocage, but if you don'g have a hyperactive extra large dog, then this may be a better choice considering that you also pay significantly less for it. The standard features will be more than enough.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
Once your puppy accepts the crate as a fact of puppy life, you can move the crate to a more acceptable spot in the house. A place next to your own bed will let the puppy sleep in its own spot but near your familiar smells and presence. That also offers you a more private area to seclude it, when necessary, from activities in the living area or kitchen that might keep your dog overstimulated.
Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo too! Both very well behaved when being supervised. Only go in crates when we are not home which isn’t often. Have a dog with anxiety? These crates have 3 latches. And the metal is thicker, heavy. Seems very well built. Takes two people, this things HEAVY. Pain in the butt to put together but worth every dollar. Love them. … more

Addendum added January 28, 2013: My vet had never noticed these carriers because I had never put one up on the exam table until my last vet visit. She looked at it with interest and totally concurred with my opinion of having a small, but open carrier for my two (panicky) cats. She has seen more than a few overheated pets in too enclosed carriers. Since I live far from the vet I always carry spare towels for the bottoms of the carriers and she found that the "stable floor covering'* I use was an additional comfort feature for my pets long trip to their appointments. (I just ordered the larger size of this carrier for my "Phat Kat" and will donate her previous carrier to our local animal shelter.)


Aside from selecting the best wire dog crate for your pooch, you should also consider accessories that add to their level of comfort and security. If your dog needs a little more privacy or warmth, a wire dog crate cover is simple to attach. A majority of containment options come with a slide out pan for easy cleaning and divider panels to adjust the space as your pup grows. For senior dog’s that suffer from joint pain, orthopedic and memory foam dog crate beds offer them much-needed support. Browse the complete collection at Petco to give your canine safe and cozy containment.
Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 
×

We read thousands of reviews! Here are the best in each category:

Pet Kennel

Foldable Crate Metal Crate
Pet Kennel
Foldable dog crate
metal crate
pet kennel foldable dog crate metal crate

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!