Continuing the trend with leaders topping our list of best travel dog crates, MidWest are best known for their top quality metal dog crates. This Midwest Life Stages folding metal dog crate in particular can be used throughout the life of your dog, and it's a great alternative to soft travel dog crates. Normally, it's recommended to buy the crate for regular use as opposed to just travel, and when looking for it, make sure to buy one for your dog's adult size (if you still have a puppy that is). Metal dog crates are good for both plane and car travel if you know how to use them. Some dogs prefer metal crates over soft, but they're not always the best option. A divider panel is included with the crate to adjust its size as your dog grows. This gives the option for the crate to be used for more than one dog, as the size of the cage can be adjusted for each dog.
Variocages heavy dog travel cage is not a popular option, mostly due to its large price tag and the fact that very few dogs and pet owners need such type of travel crate. That said, these indestructible dog cages look like something from Jurassic Park and are the only crates that are rated using government safety standards for the protection they provide during accidents. That means that they passed the front, rear and rollover crash tests. Also, all models include an emergency escape as an additional safety measure. This crate really is a must have for any dog owner that frequently travels with their pet in the car.
XXL Heavy Duty Double Door Dog Crate The extra, extra-large double door metal dog crate by MidWest Homes for Pets is specifically designed for the largest breed of dog breeds, including Great Danes, Mastiffs, and St. Bernards. This durable, heavy-duty metal dog crate features a two-door configuration with convenient front & side door access, three secure slide-bolt latches per door, four rubber 'roller' feet to protect your floors and a durable easy to clean leak-proof plastic pan. This...
Eye-catching, circular rattan pet cage is a cozy escape for your furry friend, doubling as a statement piece for your indoor or outdoor living space. This Rattan Cylinder Pet Cage is complete with double sided metal doors, perfect for enclosing your pet when guests are over or for crate training. The Rattan Cylinder Pet Cage also offers a concealed, secluded place of its own for your four-legged furry friend without having to compromise on indoor or outdoor decor. The rich UV-inhibitors coated...
- Exclusions: Orijen and Acana food & treats; over-the-counter Flea & Tick products for dogs and cats; add-on items, out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; items shipped through white glove delivery or LTL delivery; orders exceeding the maximum weight limit of 300 lbs.; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
Sometimes, our pets have a tendency to get carried away, no matter how much we love them. Don’t worry, this crate cover is here to help when you need some down time. Showcasing a geometric design in neutral hues, this cover adds a decorative touch to your space, while also blending easily with your existing color scheme. Its front folds up so you can access the crate door, and it’s machine washable for your convenience.
Free Shipping Exclusions: Cat litter, dog litter, ice melter, wild bird food, live fish & rock, aquatic gravel and accents; crickets, live food and frozen food; out-of-stock items, Donations, Petco or Unleashed by Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards; items shipped through white glove delivery or LTL delivery; orders exceeding the maximum weight limit of 300 lbs.; and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
As with all dog cages, because it's a metal dog travel crate, it's very easy to clean and it's super durable and strong, which can be the deciding factor for most. It has double doors for front and side access. It also has slide-bolt latches that provide easy entry as well as security. The Midwest Life Stages folding metal crate is surprisingly uncomplicated to set up and put away, since it folds flat. When you consider how you're going to travel, this can be either the best dog travel crate for your trip, or the worst, so make sure you know where the crate is going to go and how it's going to be used.
Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.
Dog kennels, crates, and accessories create a safe, dedicated space for your furry friend to settle into at home, a visit away, or anywhere between. Our wide selection provides secure containment while catering to your canine’s natural instinct to den. From housebreaking your new puppy to keeping the furniture chew-free, crates and kennels can be an effective training tool, while preventing destructive habits from developing.

Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.
The Petmate Sky Kennel is a great example of your standard hard-sided kennel. With good ventilation, the ability to tie it down in a car, and solid construction, this crate is a fantastic choice for medium sized dogs. The vents on the side are covered in a thicker metal, and allow for more air to come in with less chance of escape. The Sky Kennel is also recommended for travel on planes, either with you or in a luggage area.
- The 20% discount applies to your minimum one-time delivery order subtotal of $85. Subtotal refers to the amount of your one-time delivery order before taxes and shipping. The qualifying subtotal excludes any Repeat Delivery order or buy online and pick up in-store orders. All free shipping is based on Standard Shipping rates. P.O. Boxes. Alaska/Hawaii are based on USPS Priority Mail.

There is more than one way to keep your dog firmly in one spot. Harnesses offer your dog more freedom, acting more or less as seat belt attachments for your dog. Harnesses do nothing for your upholstery, windows, or door. If you keep your dog firmly in a middle seat you may be able to prevent drooling on the windows and doors, but this won’t protect the upholstery, and your dog may be able to reach into the front seat.

The owner(s) ofDevotedtodog.com is compensated to provide opinion on products, services, websites and various other topics. Even though the owner(s) of this blog receives compensation for our posts or advertisements, we always give our honest opinions, findings, beliefs, or experiences on those topics or products. The views and opinions expressed on this blog are purely the bloggers’ own. Any product claim, statistic, quote or other representation about a product or service should be verified with the manufacturer, provider or party in question.
Transporting your pet in a travel crate may be very stressful not only for your cat or dog but for you too. I’ve bought a cheap one in a supermarket, I thought it doesn’t really matter, just a simple box with windows. But my mom presented a good one, which she was choosing for a long time, and it changed our travel routine so much! My cat doesn’t try to escape his temporary home, he’s just sitting in a crate with pleasure. Be mindful and read some reviews, don’t be like me.
So I pet sit and crates are a must for those who aren't potty trained so I have a crate in every size and shape. My last 48 broke from wear and tear so I got this one and the price is good but the cage is sort of flimsy. This wouldn't be a brand I'd recommend for anxious dogs or those who try to escape. I have many metal crates and some are stronger than others but I think this one is one of the weaker ones. Still serves its purpose for the calmer dogs who won't paw at it.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.
This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after. To make matters worse, the packaging materials included styrofoam that must have been damaged in transit. The structural foam had dissintegrated causing a snow storm in the house that was very difficult to vaccuum up because of the static charge. Lastly, the crate pieces were bent when they arrived, so the packaging isn't great for shipping. This further complicated assembly because the hooks that connect the pieces saw the bulk of the damage. My dog doesn't challenge the structural integrity of the kennel, but I would guess an ambitious dog can quickly defeat this enclosure. I would not buy this one again if I could go back. In fact, I am looking for another XXL crate to use for trips so I never have to reassemble this one again... It's just not worth the hassle to return this given the price. … more
I have a friend, who doesn’t have such crate and thinks that is it’s soft and made from a textile it’ll be always dirty and wet. But I’m here just to say that if you’re thinking in such way, you’re absolutely wrong! Just look at the crates made from a waterproof material and which are comfortable for your pet to stay not only indoors but in a different transport too.
OxGord Rolling Backpack Carrier – This is something a little different for those who aren't happy with standard best travel dog carriers. OxGord's rolling backpack pet carrier is a perfect choice for people looking for something like a dog backpack carrier but suitable for long distance travel. It's very durable, has wheels, is fairly easy to store but will not collapse completely.
As pets become more like family members, it has become more common to bring them with on trips rather than leaving them at home or boarding them. The quality of soft travel crates has improved steadily in recent years. As a result, the market has been inundated with a vast array of crates from basic models to those that have tons of exciting features.
A crate is a great way to give your pup a perfect spot to curl up and snooze, while also helping you train them to understand boundaries. But there's no reason that crate can't deliver on-trend style as well! Perfect for an understated accent that can double as an end table, this piece is crafted from wood with a white finish. Slim bars round this piece out with abundant ventilation, sure to help your pup keep cool. A latch closure helps keep the front-facing door closed when you need it shut.
The Petmate Sky Kennel is a great example of your standard hard-sided kennel. With good ventilation, the ability to tie it down in a car, and solid construction, this crate is a fantastic choice for medium sized dogs. The vents on the side are covered in a thicker metal, and allow for more air to come in with less chance of escape. The Sky Kennel is also recommended for travel on planes, either with you or in a luggage area.
Variocages heavy dog travel cage is not a popular option, mostly due to its large price tag and the fact that very few dogs and pet owners need such type of travel crate. That said, these indestructible dog cages look like something from Jurassic Park and are the only crates that are rated using government safety standards for the protection they provide during accidents. That means that they passed the front, rear and rollover crash tests. Also, all models include an emergency escape as an additional safety measure. This crate really is a must have for any dog owner that frequently travels with their pet in the car.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help

The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
Choosing the right type of dog travel crate is essential, and will depend on the type of trip you're taking. Are you traveling in car? By plan? By train? Maybe you decide to travel on a motorcycle or even a bicycle. For some, soft sided dog crate may be the ultimate choice, while others will need a metal dog crate. There are many different types of best dog crates for travel that will fit any form of transportation choice.
Just like EliteField dominates the best dog travel crate market with their soft crate, Petmate is the leader with their plastic dog crates for travel due to high quality materials and the lowest prices. This Two Door Top Load dog kennel is less pricey than majority of its competitors, and through all of the features it offers, it's easily the best dog travel crate if you're looking for a plastic and sturdy option. Not only is the crate comfortable for your dog to travel around in via vehicle, but these plastic dog crates meet most airline crate requirements if you need to travel by plane with your dog. They are well built and extremely solid. In fact, if you're crate training your dog at home, this would also be a great model to choose.
After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
Her situation is not unique. Your (and others)crate training procedure assumes that the dog has an established room where he’s used to hanging out with the family and that you’ve had him/her for a while. Bull! You have to start this procedure on the very day you bring the puppy home. Otherwise, the puppy will get used to being in your bed, will start a bad habit of peeing on the floor and learn that barking and yipping through the night brings rewards. Please update your method to show how it’s done on day 1, not over time!! Thank You.

Depending on your dog, you will want to pick a crate that best suits your needs. For a smaller dog, pick a soft-sided crate or a car seat that fit them better. For a larger, stronger dog, picking a hard sided or wire crate is a better choice. All of the crates listed in this article are some of the best of their types, and there should be a choice for any dog on the list. Always remember to add beds, pads, or calming aids when picking a crate, and measure your dog first before trying to get them sized for a crate. If you are still unsure, try to get a crate that you know your dog can stand up and turn around in, as previously stated, and make sure that it is not oversized for your dog, either. Hopefully, this article will give you all the insight you need on which dog crate will be the best for you and your dog.
tether the dog to you when in the house, or section off a room or play area. this way you will be able to see him and get outside if he is looking like he needs to go. when you take him out to potty, give him 5-10 minutes. if he doesn’t go crate him for 15-30 min, then try again. lots of praise and extra treats when he goes. you won’t be crating all the time, just until he goes potty outside, then you housed be safe to tether him to you inside until next go around
When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.

I wish I would have seen the most recent review. Our puppy, key word 4 month old puppy, was able to destroy this defective and cheap product on its third use. We have used many other kennels with this dog and another adult and never had problems before. The seller is expecting me to pay return shipping on a defect item that is now trash so that I can get a refund. Do not buy this product or from this seller. This is definitely not meant for XL dogs as it states since a puppy was able to wreck it.


My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
Bring your puppy to the crate for naps and quiet-time breaks so that he can “unwind” from family chaos. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.

The Variocage is more of a machine than just a crate. Although it may have a slightly off-putting appearance, this powerful crate is designed to take the harshest punishment imaginable without a scratch. With hydraulic locks, thick metal bars, and even an emergency escape hatch, this crate is an impressive bit of handiwork. It has been proven sturdy in all different types of crash tests, and comes in sizes for any size dog.


Quick tip: If the measurements are between two crate sizes, always choose the larger size.Once you've measured your dog, you'll know the appropriate size crate to choose and now you're well on your way to choosing the best dog travel crate for your canine companion. Pet stores are full of travel crate options and you can also shop online, but the choices there will be nearly infinite.
A crate is an important thing to have for a pet. It enables them to travel more easily, and can help when it comes to training. This crate, made of manufactured wood with a solid wood finish and steel caging, allows you to bring an important part of your pet's life with you, while staying stylish. Rust-resistant and designed to be longer lasting, it comes with a black slide out tray for easy cleaning – just wipe it down. This crate comes in a variety of sizes based on the weight of your pet.
×

We read thousands of reviews! Here are the best in each category:

Pet Kennel

Foldable Crate Metal Crate
Pet Kennel
Foldable dog crate
metal crate
pet kennel foldable dog crate metal crate

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!