No matter which crate type suits you or your pup best, you’ll want to make sure that your dog has enough room to stand up and turn around in their home, but not so much room that they can soil their cage on one side, and sleep on the other, as that would negate any progress you make on the house training front. While a plastic crate would likely require you to continually upgrade as your pup grows, newer wire, metal cages are customizable with an included, movable divider, so the larger space you buy for them as a pup will also fit them as an adult.
One of the few large soft-sided crates, this travel crate fits into the back of most SUVs or hatchbacks. It pops up and folds out quickly, and the durable outside makes it suitable for camping or rougher environments. The stronger material makes it good for rougher dogs or puppies who may be teething, and it has both a side and a top entrance for ease of use.

Depending on your dog, you will want to pick a crate that best suits your needs. For a smaller dog, pick a soft-sided crate or a car seat that fit them better. For a larger, stronger dog, picking a hard sided or wire crate is a better choice. All of the crates listed in this article are some of the best of their types, and there should be a choice for any dog on the list. Always remember to add beds, pads, or calming aids when picking a crate, and measure your dog first before trying to get them sized for a crate. If you are still unsure, try to get a crate that you know your dog can stand up and turn around in, as previously stated, and make sure that it is not oversized for your dog, either. Hopefully, this article will give you all the insight you need on which dog crate will be the best for you and your dog.

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Whether you have a new puppy or an adult dog, you want to pick just the right dog kennel. After all, the kennel will serve as a part-time “home” for your dog. You want him to be safe while he’s in it, whether it’s during a time you’re not home or when you’re traveling together. A good dog kennel is sturdy and durable – strong enough that he won’t chew his way out of it while you’re running errands, but comfortable enough for him to feel good while inside. At BestReviews, we can help you find the right dog kennel for your beloved friend. We researched the dog kennel market and selected what we feel to be the very best offerings. We did not accept free samples from manufacturers during our research, because we strive to be completely honest and bias-free. For a quick overview of the best dog kennels, check out the chart above. For more information on dog kennels and how to choose one that’s right for your pet, continue reading this guide.
For what it is, PetPeppy is easily the best dog travel carrier compared to others because it's more sturdy and safe for dogs. While no additional sizes are available of this carrier, you can fit a small or small-medium dog into this travel dog crate but note that a lot of dogs find these crates uncomfortable during long trips, therefore it's best for short distance travel and short flights where you can attend to your dog faster.
You want your pets to be treated like family, and to do that, you have to incorporate their needs to your home decor. This pet crate is here to help. Crafted from solid wood, this piece showcases a planked top perched aloft its bar-designed body. Sharp angles give this piece eye-catching appeal, while its top offers a stage to display a favorite photograph or some holiday decorations. Barn door hinges keep this door on track while a latch design keeps it closed.
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
Another thing: Once they start doing something negative it can become a habit, and it is hard to break them of it. Yet they can’t seem to do good things by habit unless you give them treats *sigh*. Our dog got into the habit a few months ago of pooping and peeing in his crate every day. We had to keep to the potty schedule AND let him roam more. It’s all a power struggle. I call it revenge, and dog lovers will call it anxiety at being crated. I don’t care. I just don’t like it!
I’ve never crate trained before, this is all new to me. My new puppy pees the bed when I let her sleep with me and she needs to be in the crate while I’m at work for 4 to 5 hours. She likes her crate and wont potty in it, but cries at night. I think she just needs to potty during the night like I do. I’m going to try taking her out every time I go pee and putting her back in. When she stops peeing the my bed at night she can sleep with me. I’ve never had a puppy pee my bed at night before, but she’s wat too small to jump down and up by hersel, and not yet house broken. Other than that she’s great, and this artical isn’t all wrong. Dogs dont like to potty where they sleep and eat, and they are pack animals so they usually sleep together. I feel bad making her sleep alone right now.
There is more than one way to keep your dog firmly in one spot. Harnesses offer your dog more freedom, acting more or less as seat belt attachments for your dog. Harnesses do nothing for your upholstery, windows, or door. If you keep your dog firmly in a middle seat you may be able to prevent drooling on the windows and doors, but this won’t protect the upholstery, and your dog may be able to reach into the front seat.

How big is your crate compared to the dog? Typically dogs will not use the bathroom where they sleep if it means no matter where in the crate they go it will be touching them. If you have a crate that allows the dog to sit and lay down a decent bit away from it’s poo then it wont care and it will use the potty in the crate. Make sure the crate is the right size for the dog or at least get big fluffy blankets and pillows to block off a large portion of the crate and make sort of a wall so that if she does go to the bathroom it will be right in her face or on her if she moves an inch.


When measuring the length of your dog, you should begin at the base of the neck and measure to the base of the tail. Add 3 inches to this and that should be the minimum crate length that you should be looking for. To measure their height, simply start at the ground and measure to the top of their shoulders. Add 3 inches to this measurement to get the minimum crate height you should be looking for.
Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.
All of Petmate plastic travel dog crates, including this one, come in a variety of sizes to fit most dog breeds, although you'll be hard pressed to find one for a large breed (mostly, it's for small to medium dogs). The wire doors of these crates lock shut with a chrome squeeze door latch. The crates are shipped as two half shells and are very easy to assemble. They come with no-rust plastic wing nuts. These crates are also equipped with side air vents.
AmazonBasics Black Soft-Sided Carrier – Once again, Amazon offers its alternative to the best travel dog crate for a cheaper price. This time, it may well be worth it unlike with the plastic travel dog crates. The design of AmazonBasics pet carrier is much more simple, but the materials used are good quality and if you don't require expandable storage space, you can get this one for half of what PetPeppy costs.
On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help
Does he go pee outside at all for you? If so, be sure to give him lots of praise when he does. Say, “good boy!” and pet him a lot. If there is a pattern to him going potty in his crate, try to change when you take him out or for how long. For example, does he always go in his crate right when you get inside? If so, stay outside a little longer. Does he go 20 minutes after you come inside? Try taking him out again after 20 minutes.
Depending on your dog, you will want to pick a crate that best suits your needs. For a smaller dog, pick a soft-sided crate or a car seat that fit them better. For a larger, stronger dog, picking a hard sided or wire crate is a better choice. All of the crates listed in this article are some of the best of their types, and there should be a choice for any dog on the list. Always remember to add beds, pads, or calming aids when picking a crate, and measure your dog first before trying to get them sized for a crate. If you are still unsure, try to get a crate that you know your dog can stand up and turn around in, as previously stated, and make sure that it is not oversized for your dog, either. Hopefully, this article will give you all the insight you need on which dog crate will be the best for you and your dog.
By familiarizing your puppy with a crate early on, you’re not only creating an easy avenue for house training, you’re also allowing them to become comfortable with their future means of transportation. A crate is a great way to transport your pup – whether it’s a short trip to the vet or a big move across country – and by familiarizing your pup with a crate early on, you’ll make travel a lot easier and more comfortable for your canine companion.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help
We just received our beautiful custom kennel by Texas Custom Kennels! It really is such a beautiful piece of furniture that is usable, sturdy and classic. We enjoyed the great customer service, prompt email correspondence, ability to customize the size and also a very reasonable fabrication lead time. It was a very smooth process from when we first approached them with questions to when we received the furniture in person. Highly recommend them for their high quality and customer service!
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