Crate training, when done effectively, can be a helpful tool. Not only does it provide your new puppy with a sense of safety and stability, it also provides you, as a new puppy owner, with a way to establish order and rule in your home. Implemented and followed through with correctly, crate training is a win for all parties involved – especially for your puppy.
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On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
I had done a lot of research before I decided to purchase this crate, so I had read the reviews about packaging. The outside of the box was in good condition, but the inside packaging and crate itself was a mess! Styrofoam was everywhere. And by the time we finally got it untangled and put together, even the dogs were covered in it! The box didnt prevent the crate from becoming bent and tangled. With some tools and a strong hand, it took 2 of us an hour to put together. The crate itself is a little bent and the side door isn't very secure, but we used zip ties and all is well. Overall, we are pleased with our purchase.
If you will be removing the crate from the vehicle regularly, a wire crate can be an excellent choice. As these crates fold in and collapse easily for storage, it is easy to remove them from a car when you are done. They also can be tied down easily through the wires to secure them into place. If the crate will remain in the vehicle, a solid sided plastic crate can be useful. These crates come with spots to tie them in place, and the solid crate gives your dog a safe, secure feeling inside of their enclosed space. Either of these types can be easily sized with a pad or a bed to make the crate more comfortable for the dog inside. For smaller dogs, soft-sided crates are an option, but they are more difficult to keep in place due to their more malleable materials. Soft-sided crates typically do not come for pets that are 25 pounds or more, and are not as durable as hard sided crates. Lastly, car harnesses that attach the dog directly to a seatbelt are a choice, and while they are incredibly easy to set up simply by clicking them in place, they can be less reliable in a crash or accident. There are many different choices, so keep reading below to see what may be best for you.
I have a boxer who is 8 weeks old. We are crate training her. She is fine in the crate eats her meals in there goes in by herself when she’s tired at night however it’s totally different. The first 2 nights were fine but night 3 and 4 she just keeps whining. If I leave her there she doesn’t settle an pushes hard against the bottom of the door bending it. We have tried having someone sleep next to the crate but it did help. What do I do? I’m very tired
No matter which crate type suits you or your pup best, you’ll want to make sure that your dog has enough room to stand up and turn around in their home, but not so much room that they can soil their cage on one side, and sleep on the other, as that would negate any progress you make on the house training front. While a plastic crate would likely require you to continually upgrade as your pup grows, newer wire, metal cages are customizable with an included, movable divider, so the larger space you buy for them as a pup will also fit them as an adult.
I come home at lunch so she is crated fro 8 am to noon and then again from 1 pm until 3 pm when my son gets home from school. Every day, she has a potty accident (poop) in her crate before I come home at noon. She is a very good pup and loves her crate at night but HATES for me to leave in the morning. I am worried she won’t grow out of pooping in her crate during the day and will continue to be anxious and sad while we are not home. Would it be better for me to leave her in the bathroom with a puppy pads and toys while I go to work since she does well in her crate at night already? I have tried leaving the TV on for her to keep her entertained and feeling less anxious. I have tried leaving the room dark and quiet so she might just sleep. Nothing seems to work. Thanks for any input!
Crating also has benefits outside the home. A crated dog traveling in a car will have less chance of serious injury in case of an auto accident. If you’re traveling and stay overnight someplace, having your dog in a crate will ease the concerns of your hosts. Your dog will also be more comfortable inside the familiar surroundings of his or her own crate no matter where it’s set up.
Crate training, when done effectively, can be a helpful tool. Not only does it provide your new puppy with a sense of safety and stability, it also provides you, as a new puppy owner, with a way to establish order and rule in your home. Implemented and followed through with correctly, crate training is a win for all parties involved – especially for your puppy.
ProSelect Empire Cage – For a significantly less money, ProSelect is a decent alternative to Variocage if you're going for a short distance car travel and it's been rated as one of the best heavy duty cages for dogs. It's not crash tested, isn't as stylish or as heavy and large as Variocage, but they will be an appropriate choice for most pet owners with medium to extra large dog breeds.
Continuing the trend with leaders topping our list of best travel dog crates, MidWest are best known for their top quality metal dog crates. This Midwest Life Stages folding metal dog crate in particular can be used throughout the life of your dog, and it's a great alternative to soft travel dog crates. Normally, it's recommended to buy the crate for regular use as opposed to just travel, and when looking for it, make sure to buy one for your dog's adult size (if you still have a puppy that is). Metal dog crates are good for both plane and car travel if you know how to use them. Some dogs prefer metal crates over soft, but they're not always the best option. A divider panel is included with the crate to adjust its size as your dog grows. This gives the option for the crate to be used for more than one dog, as the size of the cage can be adjusted for each dog.
Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet. … more
I had this problem with my Chihuahua/Yorkie mixed. I moved her kennel by the back door. The backyard is where she uses the bathroom. I allowed her to stay in the yard for one hour per bathroom break. I monitored her intake. I noticed that after each meal she immediately used the bathroom- doing a number 1 and 2. I would never leave her food out because I wouldn’t be able to monitor her bathroom break. I fed her twice to 3xs a day with plenty of treats for using the bathroom outside. I treated her as soo as she walked back in the house- but that’s only if she actually used the bathroom. I hope this helps. House breaking a puppy can be frustrating.
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.
The Petmate Sky Kennel is a great example of your standard hard-sided kennel. With good ventilation, the ability to tie it down in a car, and solid construction, this crate is a fantastic choice for medium sized dogs. The vents on the side are covered in a thicker metal, and allow for more air to come in with less chance of escape. The Sky Kennel is also recommended for travel on planes, either with you or in a luggage area.
This versatile crate functions both as an end table and a safe place for your furry friend to rest when you're out. With a traditional-inspired design, this pet crate is constructed of the recycled plastic-wood polymer composite, with stainless steel hardware and accents, in a brushed silver finish. Accommodating cats, dogs, and other small animals, this crate is perfect for indoors along with being rust, odor, stain, and rot resistant. The front door can be locked thanks to the latch closure.
My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!

A must-have for any dog owner, the crate can be used as a bed, to keep them safe during car trips, or even a training tool. This essential design is crafted from steel and features two doors that can be locked for safety as well as protective rubber feet that safeguard your floors from scuffs. A divider panel lets you allot space according to a growing puppy's needs, while a plastic pan provides an easy-to-clean surface in case of accidents.
If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.

Whether you have a new puppy or an adult dog, you want to pick just the right dog kennel. After all, the kennel will serve as a part-time “home” for your dog. You want him to be safe while he’s in it, whether it’s during a time you’re not home or when you’re traveling together. A good dog kennel is sturdy and durable – strong enough that he won’t chew his way out of it while you’re running errands, but comfortable enough for him to feel good while inside. At BestReviews, we can help you find the right dog kennel for your beloved friend. We researched the dog kennel market and selected what we feel to be the very best offerings. We did not accept free samples from manufacturers during our research, because we strive to be completely honest and bias-free. For a quick overview of the best dog kennels, check out the chart above. For more information on dog kennels and how to choose one that’s right for your pet, continue reading this guide.
Our XXL dog crates are in stock and ready to ship, so choose the Midwest Dog Crate that is ideal for your pet and home, and we will ship it to you straight away. We believe in these products and are confident that you will find Midwest Extra Large Dog Crates well-built, great-looking and strong enough to last a lifetime. Your Great Dane, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Saint Bernard or other giant breed dog will love their Midwest 1154U Single Door Dog Crate or Solutions SL54DD Double Door Dog Crate.
The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.

There's no reason your master suite can't be the master suite of your pet as well! This crate doubles as a table, so it's a perfect accessory for when you want to give your pet a little bit more room in the home, but can't sacrifice surface space. Constructed of eco-friendly rubberwood with a waterproof and absorbent melamine covered floor, this is pet accommodation at its finest. Worried about Terry teething on the wood panels? Don't fret: a secure poly-panel keeps the removable swing-through...
Top Dog Tips is here to provide dog owners with the most accurate and in-depth tips and advice on dog care, health, nutrition and training from the industry experts – veterinarians, dog trainers, groomers and animal scientists. We help dog owners effortlessly choose the best dog supplies on the market. We buy, test, review and rank pet products to help you avoid the bad stuff and purchase only what's best for you and your dog.
Housebreak your dog in style and with ease when you employ the Petmaker 2 Door Foldable Dog Crate Cage. This feature-loaded crate is constructed with plastic and steel, folds for storage ease, and includes two distinct doors, a divider panel for adjusting the crate length as your dog grows, a removable plastic tray, and more. It's the crate option that grows as your favorite canine does.
The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.
As a pet parent, one of the first purchases you will likely make is a dog crate. The reason is simple—they offer your canine a cozy retreat that’s convenient and in some cases, able to be transported anywhere! With proper training, dog crates can help your furry pal control their bladder and keep them from chewing furniture. But when it comes to knowing which crate is best, that can be tough. To help, we’re going to tell you all about wire dog crates so you can make an informed decision for your canine.
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