This versatile crate functions both as an end table and a safe place for your furry friend to rest when you're out. With a traditional-inspired design, this pet crate is constructed of the recycled plastic-wood polymer composite, with stainless steel hardware and accents, in a brushed silver finish. Accommodating cats, dogs, and other small animals, this crate is perfect for indoors along with being rust, odor, stain, and rot resistant. The front door can be locked thanks to the latch closure.
Our collection offers the best dog crates available for wide-ranging applications. Our dog travel crates are designed specifically to make it easy for you and your pet to get around. We offer light- and heavyweight styles for different travel scenarios, from errand running to long-distance hauls into the backcountry. Thoughtful engineering makes our travel dog crates a cinch to to set up and transport, offering a pop-up home-away-from-home for your dog wherever you go. We’re proud to say that ours are the best travel crates for dogs on the market.

These dog crates were designed for several reasons. First and foremost, to protect your precious pet from unforeseeable hazards during your absents from home. Their crate is also designed in mind with your existing décor, eliminating those obstructive unsightly folding wire or molded plastic eye sores and replaced with a functional piece of furniture, whether it be a credenza, sideboard, accent table or a new TV console. These crates come in a number of sizes to fit your needs. All dog crates...


Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.

You’ll also want to be sure your dog is comfortable while contained. Some are soft dog carriers that your dog will love cozying up against. Others are hard-sided dog carriers made with wire or plastic, adding rigidity, but cutting down on comfort. Whether made of hard or soft materials, a soft dog mat can make all the difference. Look for a dog carrier with a mat. Or if you’d rather chose your own dog mat, purchased separately, be sure to select one that fits well so it can’t shift as your dog moves about.

Be sure to choose a dog carrier that will be easy for you to use based on your needs. Some carriers feature multiple doors on the front, sides or even on top, making it easy for you dog to enter and exit no matter how they’re placed. Many soft designs are pre-approved for carry-on pet travel carrier, ensuring you get to your destination without issue. There are backpack-style dog carriers that are great when you need to carry your dog hands-free. And dog carriers with extra pockets are perfect for storing dog treats and food, or even your wallet, phone or other belongings.


If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
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How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate with E-coating finish is built for both durability and your pet's safety. Lucky Dog crates come with a divider panel carrying handle removable crate tray and clip-on rubber feet to protect the floor. Conveniently collapsible for easy transport and storage a Lucky ...  More + Product Details Close
Did well. against a 90lbs 10 months pitbull puppy. He Is left inside this crate probably no longer than 3 hours at a time a day. At the most 4. We use this until he gets out of the teething stage or learned how to stop chewing on every soft plushy thing in the house. We place a pet bed in their too. He has room to turn around but when excited he can definitely move the cage but after being crate trained, it work very well for what it is made for.

For those with a new puppy or a nervous small dog, a cozy and secure travel crate can help make travel fun and easy. This little crate also comes with a comfortable shoulder strap so that you can go from car to your destination with ease. It is important to socialize your young puppy, but you don’t want to expose her to anything that other dogs might carry until she has finished with her vaccinations, so a convenient carrier like this is important to let you bring puppy along while keeping her safe from contagious disease.
There is more than one way to keep your dog firmly in one spot. Harnesses offer your dog more freedom, acting more or less as seat belt attachments for your dog. Harnesses do nothing for your upholstery, windows, or door. If you keep your dog firmly in a middle seat you may be able to prevent drooling on the windows and doors, but this won’t protect the upholstery, and your dog may be able to reach into the front seat.
The Single-Door Home Training Pet Crate is great for dogs of all ages and temperaments. This training kennel can be used to help contain your new dog or puppy until he or she is familiar with the house rules. This kennel can also be used as a safe place for your to dog to go if he has any anxiety over being left alone, loud noises or rowdy visitors. For ease of portability, this dog kennel can fold down and be carried by the ergonomic, latch-on handle. Created for both comfort and...

Sherpa Original Deluxe Carrier – Sherpa has been manufacturing carriers for decades, and their original deluxe travel dog carrier is easily the best one of standard dog travel carrier options. It's more stylish, the quality of materials used and the design itself is higher than that of PetPeppy or AmazonBasics, but it's more expensive than Amazon's pet carrier and it doesn't offer the extra features that PetPeppy does.
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.

Welcome to Dog Tales, a series that looks into the lives of our favorite dogs and their favorite furniture. Today we’re sitting down with Joey, the bulldog, to hear his story about how he fell in with the wrong crowd as a puppy, and how time in the dog crate helped him become a changed bulldog. In this interview, Joey hopes other young dogs can learn from his mistakes in order to avoid doing time in the dog cage:
If you have an SUV or van that opens from the back and dogs that aren’t always clean when they get in the car, you may want a dog crate that lets you load your dogs directly into the back. This effective crate is designed to fit two crates in the back of your vehicle so that two dogs can travel in comfort and safety, while enjoying the view out the back.
Selecting wire XXL Dog Crates can be overwhelming at first. Start by selecting the number of doors for your XXL dog crate. Consider where the dog cage will be located and if more that 1-door is needed. Will you ever need to relocate the dog crate to another location and if so, will multiple doors be necessary for your dogs cage? This will significantly decrease the number of dog crates for selection. Next determine style, folding, etc. or consider a puppy crate package.
Bring your puppy to the crate for naps and quiet-time breaks so that he can “unwind” from family chaos. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.

After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.
One dog owner said she actually layed on the ground becide her whining pup. I was thinking that if all you concerned dog owners spent half as much time love and concern with humans as you do with your pets this world might be a better place. Maybe more respect for others and not so much crime. Who knows….maybe humans might like the love from other humans.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
I recently adopted a 7 week old German Shepherd puppy and want to crate train him. I take him out every couple of hours to use the restroom and play with him. When I take him outside he’ll use the restroom and we praise him. However, as soon as we bring him in the house to play he eliminates randomly. They are little spots of pee. I suggested to my family that we only play with our pup outside so we don’t have these accidents. I’m afraid I’m confusing him, because if he’s not in the crate he’s outside. I don’t have experience crate training or house training.
It was a little more complicated to put together than the smaller crates, but it's perfect. My lab has to have cruciate ligament surgery and his current crate is too small with the cone. It is large enough for him to freely move around and for me to actually go in there with him to give him attention. It's big and takes up a fair amount of space, but I am very happy with the purchase. Hopefully, it will minimize the difficulty of the 12 week recovery for an active dog!

The Petmate Two Door dog crate for travel is very easy to clean because it's all plastic and, although they are made with heavy duty materials, they are surprisingly lightweight. These pet travel crates are equipped with tie-down holes in all four corners to make them more stable while traveling. They also include a hole so the door can be secured with zip-ties during travel.
My wife and I got a dog bed from Texas Custom Kennels. Robert, the owner, is as brilliant as they come. Amazing customer service, regular progress updates, and the dog bed came out beautiful. His compassion for his customers and craft is easy to see. We live in rural California (off a dirt road that the GPS has trouble finding) so we were worried about delivery. The delivery process was easy. We got an email when it shipped, an email a day before it arrived, and it showed up right on time. Now that the dog bed is our most beautiful piece of furniture in the house, I suppose the custom dog kennel is next... THANK YOU Robert!
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