When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.
Still, some puppies may have a harder time adjusting to the crate than others. Another common mistake is to expect your pup to love the crate right away. If your new pet is really crate-averse, try a new type of crate. Some dogs may prefer wire crates so they can still see their environment, while others may be the exact opposite. Also, try putting the crate in a different place. Some dogs may prefer their crate in the center of the family action while others might like it in a quieter corner of the house.
I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.
The Midwest Homes For Pets Ovation Single Door Pet Crate is perfect for travelling with your pets. It has a hard-sided frame that makes it durable. The pet crate is made from steel, which provides sturdiness and makes it last longer. It is available in an exquisite black finish that enhances its aesthetic appeal. The pet crate is available in multiple sizes, letting you choose the one that best suits your pet. The rust- and stain-resistant features make it ideal for outdoor use. Being...

My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
Now that said, it sounds like your pup does not like being crated for long periods of time. This is his way of letting you know. A couple hours here and there is not what they want. They want it all, to roam your home for hours and hours. Sorry. My oldest told me that she read dogs will mess their crate because they know you have to clean it and they will be taken out (which is why i left my dog in the crate while I cleaned it). They will also step in their crap because they know they will get a bath..a sure way of getting out and getting some affection, since you will be obliged to hold and scrub the dog. It is frustrating to say the least. And yes after the poop we had to bathe him. My husband did that, while I cleaned the cage.

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I had done a lot of research before I decided to purchase this crate, so I had read the reviews about packaging. The outside of the box was in good condition, but the inside packaging and crate itself was a mess! Styrofoam was everywhere. And by the time we finally got it untangled and put together, even the dogs were covered in it! The box didnt prevent the crate from becoming bent and tangled. With some tools and a strong hand, it took 2 of us an hour to put together. The crate itself is a little bent and the side door isn't very secure, but we used zip ties and all is well. Overall, we are pleased with our purchase.
The best dog kennels should serve multiple purposes for you and your dog. They should be durable and also easy to assemble and to disassemble when on the go, see our dog carriers for options like this. Whether you’re off on your next adventure or having company over for dinner, shop the best dog kennels and dog crates here on Chewy to best suit your needs. In addition to dog crates and furniture, Chewy has low prices on all your dog supplies including dog food, dog treats and more. Trust Chewy, for your online pet supplies.
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