Continuing the trend with leaders topping our list of best travel dog crates, MidWest are best known for their top quality metal dog crates. This Midwest Life Stages folding metal dog crate in particular can be used throughout the life of your dog, and it's a great alternative to soft travel dog crates. Normally, it's recommended to buy the crate for regular use as opposed to just travel, and when looking for it, make sure to buy one for your dog's adult size (if you still have a puppy that is). Metal dog crates are good for both plane and car travel if you know how to use them. Some dogs prefer metal crates over soft, but they're not always the best option. A divider panel is included with the crate to adjust its size as your dog grows. This gives the option for the crate to be used for more than one dog, as the size of the cage can be adjusted for each dog.
I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
A dog's den should be his castle—a place where he can relax. Frisco crates come with a plastic base pan to cover the wire floor and keep things clean. But you can also add a Frisco Crate Mat to make his den even more comfortable. This quilted fleece bed is made from soft Sherpa material with a foam cushion bottom and thick bolster to make your pet feel at home in his den.
Once you’ve decided that crate training is for you, and which crate suits your canine companion best, it’s time to look at the actual process of crate training your pup. While the length of time it takes to crate train depends on your individual animal, his or her attitude, age, and past experiences, one thing’s for sure: you always want your dog to associate the crate with something pleasant. And even with the best dogs, baby steps are the best way to make this happen.

Most dogs love to ride in the car. The wind rushing by carries all kinds of interesting smells that your dog just can’t take in quickly enough, while every stop gives your dog a chance to take in an interesting scene. Add to this the fact that usually going in the car means your dog is going to a fun destination, and it makes perfect sense that being in the car would be a very exciting thing for your dog.
Our collection offers the best dog crates available for wide-ranging applications. Our dog travel crates are designed specifically to make it easy for you and your pet to get around. We offer light- and heavyweight styles for different travel scenarios, from errand running to long-distance hauls into the backcountry. Thoughtful engineering makes our travel dog crates a cinch to to set up and transport, offering a pop-up home-away-from-home for your dog wherever you go. We’re proud to say that ours are the best travel crates for dogs on the market.
A must-have for any dog owner, the crate can be used as a bed, to keep them safe during car trips, or even a training tool. This essential design is crafted from steel and features two doors that can be locked for safety as well as protective rubber feet that safeguard your floors from scuffs. A divider panel lets you allot space according to a growing puppy's needs, while a plastic pan provides an easy-to-clean surface in case of accidents.
If you will be removing the crate from the vehicle regularly, a wire crate can be an excellent choice. As these crates fold in and collapse easily for storage, it is easy to remove them from a car when you are done. They also can be tied down easily through the wires to secure them into place. If the crate will remain in the vehicle, a solid sided plastic crate can be useful. These crates come with spots to tie them in place, and the solid crate gives your dog a safe, secure feeling inside of their enclosed space. Either of these types can be easily sized with a pad or a bed to make the crate more comfortable for the dog inside. For smaller dogs, soft-sided crates are an option, but they are more difficult to keep in place due to their more malleable materials. Soft-sided crates typically do not come for pets that are 25 pounds or more, and are not as durable as hard sided crates. Lastly, car harnesses that attach the dog directly to a seatbelt are a choice, and while they are incredibly easy to set up simply by clicking them in place, they can be less reliable in a crash or accident. There are many different choices, so keep reading below to see what may be best for you.

Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo too! Both very well behaved when being supervised. Only go in crates when we are not home which isn’t often. Have a dog with anxiety? These crates have 3 latches. And the metal is thicker, heavy. Seems very well built. Takes two people, this things HEAVY. Pain in the butt to put together but worth every dollar. Love them. … more
There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
All of Petmate plastic travel dog crates, including this one, come in a variety of sizes to fit most dog breeds, although you'll be hard pressed to find one for a large breed (mostly, it's for small to medium dogs). The wire doors of these crates lock shut with a chrome squeeze door latch. The crates are shipped as two half shells and are very easy to assemble. They come with no-rust plastic wing nuts. These crates are also equipped with side air vents.
You’ll also want to be sure your dog is comfortable while contained. Some are soft dog carriers that your dog will love cozying up against. Others are hard-sided dog carriers made with wire or plastic, adding rigidity, but cutting down on comfort. Whether made of hard or soft materials, a soft dog mat can make all the difference. Look for a dog carrier with a mat. Or if you’d rather chose your own dog mat, purchased separately, be sure to select one that fits well so it can’t shift as your dog moves about.
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
Crates don't have to be dreary affairs – just take a look at this design, for instance! Doubling as a credenza, it's a perfect pick for housing Fido as well as completing your living room look. Crafted from birch, it features a streamlined design in-line with modern aesthetics. A latch lock and ventilation bars keep Fido secure and cozy, while rust-, odor-, and stain-resistant qualities make this design a no-brainer for finishing out pet-friendly ensembles.

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