I'm very happy with this crate's size. One thing I didn't notice was that it does require some assembly (not super hard, but it does take 2 people); I thought it was going to be like my 48" crate that folds. The quality is awesome, especially for the price. I'm very impressed with the Frisco line of products overall, the price is unbeatable. The shipping for Chewy is always great and ofcourse free for a purchase like this, I'm a happy camper.
Does he go pee outside at all for you? If so, be sure to give him lots of praise when he does. Say, “good boy!” and pet him a lot. If there is a pattern to him going potty in his crate, try to change when you take him out or for how long. For example, does he always go in his crate right when you get inside? If so, stay outside a little longer. Does he go 20 minutes after you come inside? Try taking him out again after 20 minutes.
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.
There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help

Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.


Arf Pets 3 Door Crate with Strap – Essentially the same type as the EliteField's crate, Arf Pets' dog travel crate is a great alternative with a slightly different design. It's a less popular option among pet owners who travel, but it's available in different sizes and several new color schemes. The only reason to buy Art Pets over EliteField is if you prefer their colors or offered sizes, because the price, materials used and the implemented design features are exactly the same as EliteField's.
Her situation is not unique. Your (and others)crate training procedure assumes that the dog has an established room where he’s used to hanging out with the family and that you’ve had him/her for a while. Bull! You have to start this procedure on the very day you bring the puppy home. Otherwise, the puppy will get used to being in your bed, will start a bad habit of peeing on the floor and learn that barking and yipping through the night brings rewards. Please update your method to show how it’s done on day 1, not over time!! Thank You.
Choosing the right type of dog travel crate is essential, and will depend on the type of trip you're taking. Are you traveling in car? By plan? By train? Maybe you decide to travel on a motorcycle or even a bicycle. For some, soft sided dog crate may be the ultimate choice, while others will need a metal dog crate. There are many different types of best dog crates for travel that will fit any form of transportation choice.
After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
These dog crates were designed for several reasons. First and foremost, to protect your precious pet from unforeseeable hazards during your absents from home. Their crate is also designed in mind with your existing décor, eliminating those obstructive unsightly folding wire or molded plastic eye sores and replaced with a functional piece of furniture, whether it be a credenza, sideboard, accent table or a new TV console. These crates come in a number of sizes to fit your needs. All dog crates...

New World Folding Metal Crate – A decent alternative to MidWest metal crates is this from New World. As with all metal dog cages, there's little difference in their design, however, MidWest crates are all superior, which explains their insane popularity among pet owners. The only reason to choose New World crate is if you want less features in your dog crate (possibly for less complications?)
Now that said, it sounds like your pup does not like being crated for long periods of time. This is his way of letting you know. A couple hours here and there is not what they want. They want it all, to roam your home for hours and hours. Sorry. My oldest told me that she read dogs will mess their crate because they know you have to clean it and they will be taken out (which is why i left my dog in the crate while I cleaned it). They will also step in their crap because they know they will get a bath..a sure way of getting out and getting some affection, since you will be obliged to hold and scrub the dog. It is frustrating to say the least. And yes after the poop we had to bathe him. My husband did that, while I cleaned the cage.
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.
With a durable metal frame and grab-and-go duffle bag handles, the Pet Life Deluxe 360 Collapsible Pet Crate with Removable Bowl Red ensures ultimate durability and convenience when traveling with your pet. A 360-degree view keeps your pup happy, and an included removable pet bowl keeps him hydrated, too. Thinsulate technology creates an ideal temperature in the crate, and two zippered entrances allow for accessibility.
Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.
The Variocage is more of a machine than just a crate. Although it may have a slightly off-putting appearance, this powerful crate is designed to take the harshest punishment imaginable without a scratch. With hydraulic locks, thick metal bars, and even an emergency escape hatch, this crate is an impressive bit of handiwork. It has been proven sturdy in all different types of crash tests, and comes in sizes for any size dog.
Keeping your specific needs, preferences, and details about your pet’s size in mind while looking at different options is an easy way to be sure you’ll pick the perfect travel crate for your dog. There are so many wonderful options, and you are sure to find a soft sided crate that keeps your furry companion happier and safer. Please leave us a comment below with your favorite travel crate options or a fun story about traveling with your pet.
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
Be sure to choose a dog carrier that will be easy for you to use based on your needs. Some carriers feature multiple doors on the front, sides or even on top, making it easy for you dog to enter and exit no matter how they’re placed. Many soft designs are pre-approved for carry-on pet travel carrier, ensuring you get to your destination without issue. There are backpack-style dog carriers that are great when you need to carry your dog hands-free. And dog carriers with extra pockets are perfect for storing dog treats and food, or even your wallet, phone or other belongings.
I have a friend, who doesn’t have such crate and thinks that is it’s soft and made from a textile it’ll be always dirty and wet. But I’m here just to say that if you’re thinking in such way, you’re absolutely wrong! Just look at the crates made from a waterproof material and which are comfortable for your pet to stay not only indoors but in a different transport too.
When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.
If you have an SUV or van that opens from the back and dogs that aren’t always clean when they get in the car, you may want a dog crate that lets you load your dogs directly into the back. This effective crate is designed to fit two crates in the back of your vehicle so that two dogs can travel in comfort and safety, while enjoying the view out the back.
I have a boxer who is 8 weeks old. We are crate training her. She is fine in the crate eats her meals in there goes in by herself when she’s tired at night however it’s totally different. The first 2 nights were fine but night 3 and 4 she just keeps whining. If I leave her there she doesn’t settle an pushes hard against the bottom of the door bending it. We have tried having someone sleep next to the crate but it did help. What do I do? I’m very tired
Dog kennels create a cozy place to call their own, whether at home or on-the-go. With durable, versatile dog crates, pens, kennels, carriers and dog cages for pets of every size, you can give your best friend a secure, den-like retreat where they can sleep, rest and relax. At PetSmart, we carry a selection of stylish designs that make it easy to place their mini-home in your bedroom or living room.
×

We read thousands of reviews! Here are the best in each category:

Pet Kennel

Foldable Crate Metal Crate
Pet Kennel
Foldable dog crate
metal crate
pet kennel foldable dog crate metal crate

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!