When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.
Our 48-inch XXL Dog Crates accommodate dogs weighing 91-150 pounds. See dog crates size guide if you are unsure if the XXlarge dog crate is appropriate for you pet. Manufacturers of dog crates have their own measure of Large, XL, XXL crates - please check the dimension of our XXL dog crates when making a purchase. See all dog crate sizes on our Dog Crates and Dog Cages page.  
Plastic crates are maybe not the first choice for an in-home crate as they provide less visibility to the pup that calls it home, however, if you plan to do quite a bit of travel by plane, this is a great option as all airlines require this type of crate to transport your animal. Plastic crates are also great for pups that need a little more security, or for a home that has a higher level of activity (think on-the-go kiddos), as it gives your pup a bit more privacy.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help
A home for your furry friend that fits seamlessly within your home, this furniture-style crate is a must-have for the savvy pet owner. Crafted from ash wood, it functions as an end table, featuring ample space to stage table lamps, potted plants, and more, while open area down below has everything your pet needs to settle in, including a mat and ventilation windows. Rust- and rot-resistant, this essential is also easy to clean with a removable top.

Researching your options will be the next step, and I've done a ton of legwork for you with the above list of twenty best dog travel crates, listing their specifications and the modes of travel they are best used for. These travel dog crates are all safe, comfortable choices for your canine, but you'll have to find out if they meet the traveling guidelines that you need to follow and pick the right size after measuring your dog.


All of Petmate plastic travel dog crates, including this one, come in a variety of sizes to fit most dog breeds, although you'll be hard pressed to find one for a large breed (mostly, it's for small to medium dogs). The wire doors of these crates lock shut with a chrome squeeze door latch. The crates are shipped as two half shells and are very easy to assemble. They come with no-rust plastic wing nuts. These crates are also equipped with side air vents.

If you will be removing the crate from the vehicle regularly, a wire crate can be an excellent choice. As these crates fold in and collapse easily for storage, it is easy to remove them from a car when you are done. They also can be tied down easily through the wires to secure them into place. If the crate will remain in the vehicle, a solid sided plastic crate can be useful. These crates come with spots to tie them in place, and the solid crate gives your dog a safe, secure feeling inside of their enclosed space. Either of these types can be easily sized with a pad or a bed to make the crate more comfortable for the dog inside. For smaller dogs, soft-sided crates are an option, but they are more difficult to keep in place due to their more malleable materials. Soft-sided crates typically do not come for pets that are 25 pounds or more, and are not as durable as hard sided crates. Lastly, car harnesses that attach the dog directly to a seatbelt are a choice, and while they are incredibly easy to set up simply by clicking them in place, they can be less reliable in a crash or accident. There are many different choices, so keep reading below to see what may be best for you.
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
Another thing: Once they start doing something negative it can become a habit, and it is hard to break them of it. Yet they can’t seem to do good things by habit unless you give them treats *sigh*. Our dog got into the habit a few months ago of pooping and peeing in his crate every day. We had to keep to the potty schedule AND let him roam more. It’s all a power struggle. I call it revenge, and dog lovers will call it anxiety at being crated. I don’t care. I just don’t like it!

Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo Listen you don’t even have to have a huge dog to have one of these bad boys. I have two of them. I want two more. (I’m not using to potty train) I use them because I have 1 dog who I’ve found on top of our cabinets, stove, window seals, table, fridge.. yes you heard me! She’s 60lbs and she’s a stealthy cat or so she thinks. She’s a danger to herself. I don’t want her falling and getting hurt. So she gets crated. This thing is BIG, it’s like a personal condo for her while we are not home to supervise. Next we have a super chewer, nothing is safe in the house. NOTHING. (Stairs, window seals, couches, pillows, carpets, drywall) he puts his mouth on it. So yup you guessed it he gets a personal condo too! Both very well behaved when being supervised. Only go in crates when we are not home which isn’t often. Have a dog with anxiety? These crates have 3 latches. And the metal is thicker, heavy. Seems very well built. Takes two people, this things HEAVY. Pain in the butt to put together but worth every dollar. Love them. … more
A crate is a great way to give your pup a perfect spot to curl up and snooze, while also helping you train them to understand boundaries. But there's no reason that crate can't deliver on-trend style as well! Perfect for an understated accent that can double as an end table, this piece is crafted from wood with a white finish. Slim bars round this piece out with abundant ventilation, sure to help your pup keep cool. A latch closure helps keep the front-facing door closed when you need it shut.
I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
These BestPet metal crates are made with premium quality materials. They are built for long lasting, and coated with a black finish that prevents rusting and corrosion. They are made out of steel, and have high tensile strength wiring. This cage is very easy to set up. You simply just un box the item, and fold the crate. Each crate includes a light weight slid out tray that is made with ABS plastic. This tray comes with a lip around the perimeter which helps make it easy to remove and clean if necessary. With the rounded edges of the crate your pet is contained in a safe environment. The dimensions for this cage are: Size: 48x30x32 inches (LxWxH). This also features multiple doors on the cage to open, and a split divider for inside the cage.
Robert was super easy to work with and he delivered when he said he would. We were looking for a unique-shaped design to fit the space in a new house we are building, and he was very patient in sending us drawings until we got something that would fit the space perfectly. The kennels are beautiful and sturdy - we have one escape artist who can easily get out of a standard wire kennel but this ones seems like it will hold her well. Love that we can now put our pets in a space that is just as nice as the other spaces in our house!
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
For what it is, PetPeppy is easily the best dog travel carrier compared to others because it's more sturdy and safe for dogs. While no additional sizes are available of this carrier, you can fit a small or small-medium dog into this travel dog crate but note that a lot of dogs find these crates uncomfortable during long trips, therefore it's best for short distance travel and short flights where you can attend to your dog faster.

The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.

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