Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
No matter which crate type suits you or your pup best, you’ll want to make sure that your dog has enough room to stand up and turn around in their home, but not so much room that they can soil their cage on one side, and sleep on the other, as that would negate any progress you make on the house training front. While a plastic crate would likely require you to continually upgrade as your pup grows, newer wire, metal cages are customizable with an included, movable divider, so the larger space you buy for them as a pup will also fit them as an adult.
You’ll also want to be sure your dog is comfortable while contained. Some are soft dog carriers that your dog will love cozying up against. Others are hard-sided dog carriers made with wire or plastic, adding rigidity, but cutting down on comfort. Whether made of hard or soft materials, a soft dog mat can make all the difference. Look for a dog carrier with a mat. Or if you’d rather chose your own dog mat, purchased separately, be sure to select one that fits well so it can’t shift as your dog moves about.
If you have anyone else in your car, they may not appreciate your dog jumping all over their laps to get the best angle on whatever is going on outside of the window. Your dog can quickly turn a pleasant car ride into a very uncomfortable one for your guests. While they may be nice enough to not say anything about it, they may not want to go with you and your dog on your next outing.
Sliverylake Heavy Duty Metal Cage – An even cheaper alternative is this heavy duty metal cage from Sliverylake. The design is simpler and it's not as sturdy as either ProSelect of Variocage, but if you don'g have a hyperactive extra large dog, then this may be a better choice considering that you also pay significantly less for it. The standard features will be more than enough.
After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.

Because your domesticated dog will treat their crate just as a wild dog would treat their den, he will not want to soil their sleeping space. Therefore, you can be sure that, if at all possible, your dog will not have an accident in their crate, so when you let them out of their crate to go outside, he will naturally seize that opportunity to relieve themself. While there are other methods of house training your puppy, this is a very instinctual transition, requiring mainly that you take your puppy out of their crate at reasonable intervals to use the restroom. This way, your puppy will pretty easily, and perceptively, pick up that he is expected to do their business outside, not in.


I broke down and got a pompoo for my 14 yr old daughter. I am getting wonderful help from friends – but very conflicting. One says do not let pup graze – put food in crate – and shut the door. The other says never feed in crate. I tried feeding in crate – but he gets upset – spills food and whines. Now I have a pup who has not eaten and is upset. and I have to wait for the moment that he stops whining to take him out of the crate. I am exhausted and I feel he is in the crate so much already – at night and during the day when I am at work….I want him to enjoy his new family.
We have 2 beagles that have always been crated together. As they have grown, we wanted to get them a larger kennel that would give them more space to relax while we were at work. I ordered this kennel after having read only the positive reviews; that turned out to be the biggest mistake ever. After only 2 weeks of use, we found 2 species of the metal bar inside of the crate after coming home from work. I immediately replaced this create with one purchased from a local pet store. My biggest concern was that my dogs could have been seriously injured by the metal pieces and I would have no idea. After all, the purpose of the crate is to protect them while we are away. I immediately contacted the seller requesting a return and they denied me, saying this was "damaged during use." I was appalled. This crate made for very large dogs; how could I not have the expectation that it would withstand my two medium sized dogs? After several emails with the seller including photos of the damage done, they offered me a 15% refund - $11.00 USD. I really hope anyone reading this review will learn from my mistake and take the negative reviews of this product seriously. It is a very poor quality product, which wouldn't be so bad if the seller stood behind it. Please, if you care about your pets at all, DO NOT purchase this product. Doing so would only potentially endanger your beloved pets.

If you will be removing the crate from the vehicle regularly, a wire crate can be an excellent choice. As these crates fold in and collapse easily for storage, it is easy to remove them from a car when you are done. They also can be tied down easily through the wires to secure them into place. If the crate will remain in the vehicle, a solid sided plastic crate can be useful. These crates come with spots to tie them in place, and the solid crate gives your dog a safe, secure feeling inside of their enclosed space. Either of these types can be easily sized with a pad or a bed to make the crate more comfortable for the dog inside. For smaller dogs, soft-sided crates are an option, but they are more difficult to keep in place due to their more malleable materials. Soft-sided crates typically do not come for pets that are 25 pounds or more, and are not as durable as hard sided crates. Lastly, car harnesses that attach the dog directly to a seatbelt are a choice, and while they are incredibly easy to set up simply by clicking them in place, they can be less reliable in a crash or accident. There are many different choices, so keep reading below to see what may be best for you.
If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.
If you have anyone else in your car, they may not appreciate your dog jumping all over their laps to get the best angle on whatever is going on outside of the window. Your dog can quickly turn a pleasant car ride into a very uncomfortable one for your guests. While they may be nice enough to not say anything about it, they may not want to go with you and your dog on your next outing.

If your pup begins whining at this stage, it could be a sign that you’ve moved too fast. Return to a length of time where he’s comfortable without whining and move forward from there. If he does whine, do not let your dog out unless he stops or he will begin to associate whining with being let out. This is not a habit you want to start or perpetuate.

- Exclusions: Dog food, cat food, cat litter, dog litter, wild bird food, live fish & rock, crickets, live food and frozen food; Pet Pharmacy; select Zilla Critter Cages; Educator E-Collar products; Frontline Plus and Frontline Tritak and Doctor's Foster & Smith Fiprotrol Plus; Cali Vinyl products; Petsafe Brands (PetSafe, SportDOG, Frolicat, Drinkwell, Solvit', ScoopFree, Pet Loo, Gentle Leader, Mr. Herzher's and Piddle Place); Buy online and pick up in-store orders; Repeat Delivery orders and subscriptions; PetcoOne and WholeHearted Memberships and orders; out-of-stock items, prior purchases, Donations, Petco Gift Cards and eGift Cards and applicable taxes. Additional exclusions may apply and will be noted on the Product Detail page and/or Shopping Cart.
The best dog kennels should serve multiple purposes for you and your dog. They should be durable and also easy to assemble and to disassemble when on the go, see our dog carriers for options like this. Whether you’re off on your next adventure or having company over for dinner, shop the best dog kennels and dog crates here on Chewy to best suit your needs. In addition to dog crates and furniture, Chewy has low prices on all your dog supplies including dog food, dog treats and more. Trust Chewy, for your online pet supplies.
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