Welcome to Dog Tales, a series that looks into the lives of our favorite dogs and their favorite furniture. Today we’re sitting down with Joey, the bulldog, to hear his story about how he fell in with the wrong crowd as a puppy, and how time in the dog crate helped him become a changed bulldog. In this interview, Joey hopes other young dogs can learn from his mistakes in order to avoid doing time in the dog cage:


My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
Every sofa’s sidekick, end tables display decor, hold TV remotes and beverages, and round out seating ensembles in style. And with an integrated, pet-friendly cage built in, this one is the perfect pick for any home with furry four-legged friends running around! Made from manufactured wood and metal, it strikes a clean-lined silhouette and boasts a crisp white coloring for a look that won’t clash with your color palette. Plus, it includes a removable liner to help with cleaning.

Welcome to Dog Tales, a series that looks into the lives of our favorite dogs and their favorite furniture. Today we’re sitting down with Joey, the bulldog, to hear his story about how he fell in with the wrong crowd as a puppy, and how time in the dog crate helped him become a changed bulldog. In this interview, Joey hopes other young dogs can learn from his mistakes in order to avoid doing time in the dog cage:


I love the size of this crate and the tray on the bottom it's a great thing to have when a "time out" needed. However, we experienced some of the same problems as others; puppy tearing it apart because of small gage wire, welds not holding, needing to use zip-tries to hold the walls together and problems opening the door latches - this is why it received 3 stars for this review. My husband called the company and they readily fixed the issue without a hassle or argument; the company itself gets 5 stars for their customer service.
OxGord Rolling Backpack Carrier – This is something a little different for those who aren't happy with standard best travel dog carriers. OxGord's rolling backpack pet carrier is a perfect choice for people looking for something like a dog backpack carrier but suitable for long distance travel. It's very durable, has wheels, is fairly easy to store but will not collapse completely.
The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate with E-coating finish is built for both durability and your pet's safety. Lucky Dog crates come with a divider panel carrying handle removable crate tray and clip-on rubber feet to protect the floor. Conveniently collapsible for easy transport and storage a Lucky ...  More + Product Details Close
PetPeppy dog travel carrier is not waterproof or water-resistant and may be difficult to clean due to its construction and the materials used. The main reason a pet owner would buy this is due to how easy it is to carry it, especially if you have small dogs. The expandable space is also a huge advantage since you can store your dog's toys and other supplies without having to carry them with you, but that obviously makes the crate less ergonomic and expands its sides, which makes it less easy to carry.

Choosing the right type of dog travel crate is essential, and will depend on the type of trip you're taking. Are you traveling in car? By plan? By train? Maybe you decide to travel on a motorcycle or even a bicycle. For some, soft sided dog crate may be the ultimate choice, while others will need a metal dog crate. There are many different types of best dog crates for travel that will fit any form of transportation choice.


There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
This carrier is made of a durable luggage-grade nylon outside and is ultra plush polyester inside. A padded shoulder strap and handle are included so that you can easily carry your pup however you like. The bedding that comes with this crate is washable, and the foam liner is water-resistant, so you know you will have this crate until your pup is grown and much longer.
The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.
Another leader in its category, PetPeppy's premium airline approved dog travel crate is visually appealing, stylish and comes with a ton of features that makes it easy to carry your dog. It only comes in a single color (black with red accent) and have huge mesh windows on each side that will give your dog lots of ventilation. It's expandable that allows for tons of extra storage. As with all other pet carriers, this best dog travel crate doesn't need any assembly and it somewhat collapsible if you need to store it away. You won't need any tools for this one either.
Remember to measure your pet for the paw-fect fit. Frisco XX-Large Heavy Duty Double Door Dog Crate is constructed to be strong and durable while providing your pet with safety, security and comfort. Two large doors — one on the front and one on the side — are easy to open, close and securely lock, with three latches on each. Durable drop-pin hinges keep your pet safe and secure. And an included plastic base pan sits on the bottom of the crate for easy cleanup and for your dog’s comfort. No tools needed for assembly. And with a protective, black electro-coat finish, it's made to last.

My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks


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