When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
Another thing: Once they start doing something negative it can become a habit, and it is hard to break them of it. Yet they can’t seem to do good things by habit unless you give them treats *sigh*. Our dog got into the habit a few months ago of pooping and peeing in his crate every day. We had to keep to the potty schedule AND let him roam more. It’s all a power struggle. I call it revenge, and dog lovers will call it anxiety at being crated. I don’t care. I just don’t like it!
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
The collapsible design of the Pet Life Lightweight Folding Collapsible Zippered Easy Pet Crate Khaki makes it ideal for traveling and easy pet transport. Your pet has the option of a 360-degree view, or you can close the shades to block outside excitement. A scratchproof Sherpa cushion provides ultimate comfort, able to keep your pet both warm and cool, and can be machine-washed for easy maintenance. A built-in leash holder ensures that your pup stays near his little bed, and the high-tech insulation keeps an ideal temperature. Phenomenal for outdoor ...
Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.
• Material: Look for items constructed from a lightweight yet durable frame material such as aluminum or steel. Both options are light enough to make carrying and set up simple. These durable metals will also be able to hold up to the wear and tear exerted on a travel carrier. You’ll also need to make special considerations for pets that like to chew.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
We have 2 beagles that have always been crated together. As they have grown, we wanted to get them a larger kennel that would give them more space to relax while we were at work. I ordered this kennel after having read only the positive reviews; that turned out to be the biggest mistake ever. After only 2 weeks of use, we found 2 species of the metal bar inside of the crate after coming home from work. I immediately replaced this create with one purchased from a local pet store. My biggest concern was that my dogs could have been seriously injured by the metal pieces and I would have no idea. After all, the purpose of the crate is to protect them while we are away. I immediately contacted the seller requesting a return and they denied me, saying this was "damaged during use." I was appalled. This crate made for very large dogs; how could I not have the expectation that it would withstand my two medium sized dogs? After several emails with the seller including photos of the damage done, they offered me a 15% refund - $11.00 USD. I really hope anyone reading this review will learn from my mistake and take the negative reviews of this product seriously. It is a very poor quality product, which wouldn't be so bad if the seller stood behind it. Please, if you care about your pets at all, DO NOT purchase this product. Doing so would only potentially endanger your beloved pets.
OxGord Rolling Backpack Carrier – This is something a little different for those who aren't happy with standard best travel dog carriers. OxGord's rolling backpack pet carrier is a perfect choice for people looking for something like a dog backpack carrier but suitable for long distance travel. It's very durable, has wheels, is fairly easy to store but will not collapse completely.
Welcome to Dog Tales, a series that looks into the lives of our favorite dogs and their favorite furniture. Today we’re sitting down with Joey, the bulldog, to hear his story about how he fell in with the wrong crowd as a puppy, and how time in the dog crate helped him become a changed bulldog. In this interview, Joey hopes other young dogs can learn from his mistakes in order to avoid doing time in the dog cage:
The perfect crate should be just large enough for a puppy to go inside, turn around, and lie down to sleep, but not so large that your dog can soil one side of the crate and sleep on the other side. Of course, puppies grow. So take into account your pup’s future adult size before investing in a pricey dog crate. Large crates are available with partitions for you to “shrink” to puppy size, and then enlarge the area as your puppy grows. You can also purchase an adult-size crate, and insert a barrier like a plastic storage box that shrinks the space to puppy proportions until your pet grows into its crate. 
Also, please note that because of volume , we are unable to respond to individual comments, although we do watch them in order to learn what issues and questions are most common so that we can produce content that fulfills your needs. You are welcome to share your own dog tips and behavior solutions among yourselves, however Thank you for reading our articles and sharing your thoughts with the pack!
Just like EliteField dominates the best dog travel crate market with their soft crate, Petmate is the leader with their plastic dog crates for travel due to high quality materials and the lowest prices. This Two Door Top Load dog kennel is less pricey than majority of its competitors, and through all of the features it offers, it's easily the best dog travel crate if you're looking for a plastic and sturdy option. Not only is the crate comfortable for your dog to travel around in via vehicle, but these plastic dog crates meet most airline crate requirements if you need to travel by plane with your dog. They are well built and extremely solid. In fact, if you're crate training your dog at home, this would also be a great model to choose.
I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
Our collection offers the best dog crates available for wide-ranging applications. Our dog travel crates are designed specifically to make it easy for you and your pet to get around. We offer light- and heavyweight styles for different travel scenarios, from errand running to long-distance hauls into the backcountry. Thoughtful engineering makes our travel dog crates a cinch to to set up and transport, offering a pop-up home-away-from-home for your dog wherever you go. We’re proud to say that ours are the best travel crates for dogs on the market.
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Crates don't have to be dreary affairs – just take a look at this design, for instance! Doubling as a credenza, it's a perfect pick for housing Fido as well as completing your living room look. Crafted from birch, it features a streamlined design in-line with modern aesthetics. A latch lock and ventilation bars keep Fido secure and cozy, while rust-, odor-, and stain-resistant qualities make this design a no-brainer for finishing out pet-friendly ensembles.


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