Hi . We’ve only had our puppy 4 days and she’s doing well with the toilet training . Our problem is she doesn’t like being on her own and she barks and howls when put in her crate at night.I know it’s early days but it upsets me to hear her we’ve made it cosy for her and she will go in if her own accord but once we’ve left the room she gets really distressed. Any ideas ? Marie
After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
If your pup begins whining at this stage, it could be a sign that you’ve moved too fast. Return to a length of time where he’s comfortable without whining and move forward from there. If he does whine, do not let your dog out unless he stops or he will begin to associate whining with being let out. This is not a habit you want to start or perpetuate.

I just got my crate in today, I pulled it out of the box and put it right back in to return for a refund. It is a peace of junk. I guess they ran out of tops because they used a side panel with a door for the top. The metal pan is bent I have never seen locks like this before. It's flimsy and cheap. I have 4 boxers and already have 3 crates set up, I got this one to move my 6month old to a bigger crate. I would not trust his life to this crate, I honestly am scared he would get hurt or kill his self in this crate. I'm only giving 1 star because I have to give something or I would give it 0 stars! I've asked to return and refund it better not be decided but if it is this crate will see my trash, I've already ordered a better one.


Do you like things in your house to look a certain way? Tired of unattractive pet crates? Look no further than this one: crafted from solid wood and metal, it looks like a credenza but acts like a crate. It features crown molding on the top and a solidly-hued finish for a traditional look, and is accented by metal bars so your pet can look out. It's also odor-, rust-, and stain-resistant.
When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.
Once your dog is hanging out in her closed crate without signs of stress, it’s time to lengthen her stay. Use a favorite toy or treat to encourage her to enter the crate, then close it. Hang out by the crate for several minutes, then go into a different room for a few minutes so she gets used to the idea of staying in the crate alone. When you return, don’t open the crate immediately. Instead, sit with her again for a few more minutes and then open the door.Keep increasing the time as you do this until your dog is able to stay in the locked crate for half an hour without your presence. When she’s able to do this, she’s ready for you to leave her for short periods and possibly even sleep in the closed crate overnight. Make sure you keep the crate relatively nearby for overnight stays though. Puppies usually need to go to the bathroom overnight and you’ll want to be able to let her out.
On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
This versatile crate functions both as an end table and a safe place for your furry friend to rest when you're out. With a traditional-inspired design, this pet crate is constructed of the recycled plastic-wood polymer composite, with stainless steel hardware and accents, in a brushed silver finish. Accommodating cats, dogs, and other small animals, this crate is perfect for indoors along with being rust, odor, stain, and rot resistant. The front door can be locked thanks to the latch closure.
Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 
There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.

Frisco Heavy Duty Double Door Dog Crate provides your pup with a space of his own when you’re away or when you have company. It’s a strong and durable crate that provides safety and comfort. It also features two doors with a three lock system for extra security. And it has an independent pan stop which can be removed without opening the door. It’s available is an array of sizes, including extra-large dog crate size, so there’s definitely a perfect one to fit your furry friend.
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