I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
Because your domesticated dog will treat their crate just as a wild dog would treat their den, he will not want to soil their sleeping space. Therefore, you can be sure that, if at all possible, your dog will not have an accident in their crate, so when you let them out of their crate to go outside, he will naturally seize that opportunity to relieve themself. While there are other methods of house training your puppy, this is a very instinctual transition, requiring mainly that you take your puppy out of their crate at reasonable intervals to use the restroom. This way, your puppy will pretty easily, and perceptively, pick up that he is expected to do their business outside, not in.
I recently adopted a 7 week old German Shepherd puppy and want to crate train him. I take him out every couple of hours to use the restroom and play with him. When I take him outside he’ll use the restroom and we praise him. However, as soon as we bring him in the house to play he eliminates randomly. They are little spots of pee. I suggested to my family that we only play with our pup outside so we don’t have these accidents. I’m afraid I’m confusing him, because if he’s not in the crate he’s outside. I don’t have experience crate training or house training.
Aside from selecting the best wire dog crate for your pooch, you should also consider accessories that add to their level of comfort and security. If your dog needs a little more privacy or warmth, a wire dog crate cover is simple to attach. A majority of containment options come with a slide out pan for easy cleaning and divider panels to adjust the space as your pup grows. For senior dog’s that suffer from joint pain, orthopedic and memory foam dog crate beds offer them much-needed support. Browse the complete collection at Petco to give your canine safe and cozy containment.

The Petmate Sky Kennel is a great example of your standard hard-sided kennel. With good ventilation, the ability to tie it down in a car, and solid construction, this crate is a fantastic choice for medium sized dogs. The vents on the side are covered in a thicker metal, and allow for more air to come in with less chance of escape. The Sky Kennel is also recommended for travel on planes, either with you or in a luggage area.
Our XXL dog crates are in stock and ready to ship, so choose the Midwest Dog Crate that is ideal for your pet and home, and we will ship it to you straight away. We believe in these products and are confident that you will find Midwest Extra Large Dog Crates well-built, great-looking and strong enough to last a lifetime. Your Great Dane, Mastiff, Newfoundland, Saint Bernard or other giant breed dog will love their Midwest 1154U Single Door Dog Crate or Solutions SL54DD Double Door Dog Crate.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!

Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
What I’m trying to understand is how do I keep puppy safe/keep from potting at night if I don’t keep him in the crate at night? We brought our puppy home a week ago and he’s slept in the crate since the first night. Outside of the first night, he’s slept through (10p-6a). I stayed downstairs with him the first 3 or 4 nights and moved him further into the kitchen each night. I’ve moved back up to my bedroom the last 3 nights. He yelps 5-10 minutes and then goes to sleep. Occasionally I put him in the crate during the day (preparing meals, using the bathroom). Am I doing more harm than good because he wasn’t introduced more gradually?
The perfect crate should be just large enough for a puppy to go inside, turn around, and lie down to sleep, but not so large that your dog can soil one side of the crate and sleep on the other side. Of course, puppies grow. So take into account your pup’s future adult size before investing in a pricey dog crate. Large crates are available with partitions for you to “shrink” to puppy size, and then enlarge the area as your puppy grows. You can also purchase an adult-size crate, and insert a barrier like a plastic storage box that shrinks the space to puppy proportions until your pet grows into its crate. 
ProSelect Empire Cage – For a significantly less money, ProSelect is a decent alternative to Variocage if you're going for a short distance car travel and it's been rated as one of the best heavy duty cages for dogs. It's not crash tested, isn't as stylish or as heavy and large as Variocage, but they will be an appropriate choice for most pet owners with medium to extra large dog breeds.
Whether you have a new puppy or an adult dog, you want to pick just the right dog kennel. After all, the kennel will serve as a part-time “home” for your dog. You want him to be safe while he’s in it, whether it’s during a time you’re not home or when you’re traveling together. A good dog kennel is sturdy and durable – strong enough that he won’t chew his way out of it while you’re running errands, but comfortable enough for him to feel good while inside. At BestReviews, we can help you find the right dog kennel for your beloved friend. We researched the dog kennel market and selected what we feel to be the very best offerings. We did not accept free samples from manufacturers during our research, because we strive to be completely honest and bias-free. For a quick overview of the best dog kennels, check out the chart above. For more information on dog kennels and how to choose one that’s right for your pet, continue reading this guide.

Selecting wire XXL Dog Crates can be overwhelming at first. Start by selecting the number of doors for your XXL dog crate. Consider where the dog cage will be located and if more that 1-door is needed. Will you ever need to relocate the dog crate to another location and if so, will multiple doors be necessary for your dogs cage? This will significantly decrease the number of dog crates for selection. Next determine style, folding, etc. or consider a puppy crate package.

Whether you’re preparing for a new pup or creating a secure environment, these pet containment solutions come in handy when house training your dog. Many wire dog crates are equipped with divider panels that allow your pet’s space to grow with them. Getting the correct size plays a huge role in how successful you are with crate training. It may seem like a good idea to buy a large wire dog crate but in actuality, your pet may use one side as their bedroom and the other as a bathroom. By providing the right amount of space, your canine is less likely to soil their resting spot.
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