There's no reason your master suite can't be the master suite of your pet as well! This crate doubles as a table, so it's a perfect accessory for when you want to give your pet a little bit more room in the home, but can't sacrifice surface space. Constructed of eco-friendly rubberwood with a waterproof and absorbent melamine covered floor, this is pet accommodation at its finest. Worried about Terry teething on the wood panels? Don't fret: a secure poly-panel keeps the removable swing-through...
I love the size of this crate and the tray on the bottom it's a great thing to have when a "time out" needed. However, we experienced some of the same problems as others; puppy tearing it apart because of small gage wire, welds not holding, needing to use zip-tries to hold the walls together and problems opening the door latches - this is why it received 3 stars for this review. My husband called the company and they readily fixed the issue without a hassle or argument; the company itself gets 5 stars for their customer service.
This carrier is made of a durable luggage-grade nylon outside and is ultra plush polyester inside. A padded shoulder strap and handle are included so that you can easily carry your pup however you like. The bedding that comes with this crate is washable, and the foam liner is water-resistant, so you know you will have this crate until your pup is grown and much longer.
I recently adopted a 7 week old German Shepherd puppy and want to crate train him. I take him out every couple of hours to use the restroom and play with him. When I take him outside he’ll use the restroom and we praise him. However, as soon as we bring him in the house to play he eliminates randomly. They are little spots of pee. I suggested to my family that we only play with our pup outside so we don’t have these accidents. I’m afraid I’m confusing him, because if he’s not in the crate he’s outside. I don’t have experience crate training or house training.
The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.
Still, some puppies may have a harder time adjusting to the crate than others. Another common mistake is to expect your pup to love the crate right away. If your new pet is really crate-averse, try a new type of crate. Some dogs may prefer wire crates so they can still see their environment, while others may be the exact opposite. Also, try putting the crate in a different place. Some dogs may prefer their crate in the center of the family action while others might like it in a quieter corner of the house.
If you will be removing the crate from the vehicle regularly, a wire crate can be an excellent choice. As these crates fold in and collapse easily for storage, it is easy to remove them from a car when you are done. They also can be tied down easily through the wires to secure them into place. If the crate will remain in the vehicle, a solid sided plastic crate can be useful. These crates come with spots to tie them in place, and the solid crate gives your dog a safe, secure feeling inside of their enclosed space. Either of these types can be easily sized with a pad or a bed to make the crate more comfortable for the dog inside. For smaller dogs, soft-sided crates are an option, but they are more difficult to keep in place due to their more malleable materials. Soft-sided crates typically do not come for pets that are 25 pounds or more, and are not as durable as hard sided crates. Lastly, car harnesses that attach the dog directly to a seatbelt are a choice, and while they are incredibly easy to set up simply by clicking them in place, they can be less reliable in a crash or accident. There are many different choices, so keep reading below to see what may be best for you.
When measuring the length of your dog, you should begin at the base of the neck and measure to the base of the tail. Add 3 inches to this and that should be the minimum crate length that you should be looking for. To measure their height, simply start at the ground and measure to the top of their shoulders. Add 3 inches to this measurement to get the minimum crate height you should be looking for.

Wire dog crates are ideal for pets with long coats or those who live in warmer climates. The continuous air flow keeps them cool while the open design allows them to see their surroundings. Wire and metal dog crate sizes range from X-Small, for a max weight of 20 LBS, all the way up to XX-Large, for a max weight of 140 LBS. While it’s good to know your dog’s weight, you can also reference our crate sizing guide to get a better idea of which size works for each breed.
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