I have a 4 month old terrier/Chihuahua mix. I got him at 2 months old. He will sleep in the crate overnight. He will go in the crate during the day by himself. My problem is that he is still peeing and pooping all over my house. I take him out in the morning, I take him out about every 1 and 1/2 to two hours. I don’t want to keep him in his crate all the time but if he is in the house and not in constant view he is peeing or pooping. And you wouldn’t believe how fast he is at it. If I take him out more often he just plays. I’ve crate trained dogs before and never had this problem. Please help
AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Crate – Yet again Amazon is there to offer a cheaper alternative to MidWest travel dog crates. Their AmazonBasics double door folding crate is exactly the same as the iCrate, and costs a few dollars less. Otherwise, the design has been copied from MidWest. It may or may not be worth it when consider that MidWest also offers great customer support and advice for their fan base.

So I pet sit and crates are a must for those who aren't potty trained so I have a crate in every size and shape. My last 48 broke from wear and tear so I got this one and the price is good but the cage is sort of flimsy. This wouldn't be a brand I'd recommend for anxious dogs or those who try to escape. I have many metal crates and some are stronger than others but I think this one is one of the weaker ones. Still serves its purpose for the calmer dogs who won't paw at it.
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
AmazonBasics Double-Door Folding Crate – Yet again Amazon is there to offer a cheaper alternative to MidWest travel dog crates. Their AmazonBasics double door folding crate is exactly the same as the iCrate, and costs a few dollars less. Otherwise, the design has been copied from MidWest. It may or may not be worth it when consider that MidWest also offers great customer support and advice for their fan base.
This versatile crate functions both as an end table and a safe place for your furry friend to rest when you're out. With a traditional-inspired design, this pet crate is constructed of the recycled plastic-wood polymer composite, with stainless steel hardware and accents, in a brushed silver finish. Accommodating cats, dogs, and other small animals, this crate is perfect for indoors along with being rust, odor, stain, and rot resistant. The front door can be locked thanks to the latch closure.

You want your pets to be treated like family, and to do that, you have to incorporate their needs to your home decor. This pet crate is here to help. Crafted from solid wood, this piece showcases a planked top perched aloft its bar-designed body. Sharp angles give this piece eye-catching appeal, while its top offers a stage to display a favorite photograph or some holiday decorations. Barn door hinges keep this door on track while a latch design keeps it closed.


Choose a well-ventilated crate that is large enough for your puppy to stand up, lie down, and turn around. Remember that your puppy’s crate will have to grow as he does, so purchase a crate that is appropriate for your dog’s expected full-grown size, and use a divider to make the crate smaller for the time being. Many crates available at pet-supply stores include dividers.
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.

Once you’ve decided that crate training is for you, and which crate suits your canine companion best, it’s time to look at the actual process of crate training your pup. While the length of time it takes to crate train depends on your individual animal, his or her attitude, age, and past experiences, one thing’s for sure: you always want your dog to associate the crate with something pleasant. And even with the best dogs, baby steps are the best way to make this happen.
A must-have for any dog owner, the crate can be used as a bed, to keep them safe during car trips, or even a training tool. This essential design is crafted from steel and features two doors that can be locked for safety as well as protective rubber feet that safeguard your floors from scuffs. A divider panel lets you allot space according to a growing puppy's needs, while a plastic pan provides an easy-to-clean surface in case of accidents.
This carrier is made of a durable luggage-grade nylon outside and is ultra plush polyester inside. A padded shoulder strap and handle are included so that you can easily carry your pup however you like. The bedding that comes with this crate is washable, and the foam liner is water-resistant, so you know you will have this crate until your pup is grown and much longer.
Her situation is not unique. Your (and others)crate training procedure assumes that the dog has an established room where he’s used to hanging out with the family and that you’ve had him/her for a while. Bull! You have to start this procedure on the very day you bring the puppy home. Otherwise, the puppy will get used to being in your bed, will start a bad habit of peeing on the floor and learn that barking and yipping through the night brings rewards. Please update your method to show how it’s done on day 1, not over time!! Thank You.
• Material: Look for items constructed from a lightweight yet durable frame material such as aluminum or steel. Both options are light enough to make carrying and set up simple. These durable metals will also be able to hold up to the wear and tear exerted on a travel carrier. You’ll also need to make special considerations for pets that like to chew.
The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight collapsible crate is composed of heavy-duty Ballistic Nylon and Mesh with bendable yet sturdy built-in flexible extenders that hook and loop into place and hold up the 2 outer mesh expandable sides. Fully expands on both sides and collapses and folds. Perfect ...  More + Product Details Close

Once your puppy accepts the crate as a fact of puppy life, you can move the crate to a more acceptable spot in the house. A place next to your own bed will let the puppy sleep in its own spot but near your familiar smells and presence. That also offers you a more private area to seclude it, when necessary, from activities in the living area or kitchen that might keep your dog overstimulated.

Show it to the dog, let it smell and taste the treat, and then toss it inside the crate and shut the door, with the puppy outside the crate and the treat on the inside. That shows that an absolutely scrumptious puppy treat is inside, out of paw-reach. And after the pup has begged and scratched and whined to get inside, open the door and let it get the toy inside the crate. Allow your pup to chew and enjoy it for five minutes with the door shut and the dog remaining in the crate. Some pups settle down and enjoy their treat with no fanfare. Others throw a fit and want out. So if your puppy fusses let it out, but lock the treat back inside. You’re teaching the dog that wonderful things can be found inside the crate. Most pups learn to tolerate the door shut at least as long as they have something to munch.
The metal frame construction of the Pet Life 360-Degree Vista-View Soft Folding Collapsible Crate ensures ultimate durability when traveling. Mesh windows give your pooch a 360-degree view that he'll love, and multiple entrances make it easy on the both of you. A built-in leash holder keeps your pet from wandering off, and the duffle-style nylon handles make it easy for you to grab and go.
tether the dog to you when in the house, or section off a room or play area. this way you will be able to see him and get outside if he is looking like he needs to go. when you take him out to potty, give him 5-10 minutes. if he doesn’t go crate him for 15-30 min, then try again. lots of praise and extra treats when he goes. you won’t be crating all the time, just until he goes potty outside, then you housed be safe to tether him to you inside until next go around
tether the dog to you when in the house, or section off a room or play area. this way you will be able to see him and get outside if he is looking like he needs to go. when you take him out to potty, give him 5-10 minutes. if he doesn’t go crate him for 15-30 min, then try again. lots of praise and extra treats when he goes. you won’t be crating all the time, just until he goes potty outside, then you housed be safe to tether him to you inside until next go around
There's no reason your master suite can't be the master suite of your pet as well! This crate doubles as a table, so it's a perfect accessory for when you want to give your pet a little bit more room in the home, but can't sacrifice surface space. Constructed of eco-friendly rubberwood with a waterproof and absorbent melamine covered floor, this is pet accommodation at its finest. Worried about Terry teething on the wood panels? Don't fret: a secure poly-panel keeps the removable swing-through...
If your pup begins whining at this stage, it could be a sign that you’ve moved too fast. Return to a length of time where he’s comfortable without whining and move forward from there. If he does whine, do not let your dog out unless he stops or he will begin to associate whining with being let out. This is not a habit you want to start or perpetuate.

If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.

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Hi . We’ve only had our puppy 4 days and she’s doing well with the toilet training . Our problem is she doesn’t like being on her own and she barks and howls when put in her crate at night.I know it’s early days but it upsets me to hear her we’ve made it cosy for her and she will go in if her own accord but once we’ve left the room she gets really distressed. Any ideas ? Marie

I had this problem with my Chihuahua/Yorkie mixed. I moved her kennel by the back door. The backyard is where she uses the bathroom. I allowed her to stay in the yard for one hour per bathroom break. I monitored her intake. I noticed that after each meal she immediately used the bathroom- doing a number 1 and 2. I would never leave her food out because I wouldn’t be able to monitor her bathroom break. I fed her twice to 3xs a day with plenty of treats for using the bathroom outside. I treated her as soo as she walked back in the house- but that’s only if she actually used the bathroom. I hope this helps. House breaking a puppy can be frustrating.
On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!

Go PetClub Soft-Sided Dog Crate is the perfect compact and lightweight kennel for your pup. It features a water resistant, heavy duty polyester cover with PVC backing. It’s the perfect portable home for you and your furry friend. The screen mesh door provides secure confinement and adjustable ventilation on all four sides. Plus, it comes with a sheepskin dog mat and removable lambs-wool floor pad designed for extra comfort. Firstrax Noz2Noz Sof-Krate N2 Series Indoor and Outdoor Pet House is a stylish and lightweight soft-crate that’s washable, durable and well ventilated. It’s perfect for use indoors or outdoors. Plus, it’s collapsible for easy transfer from room to room or for travel purposes. And the rounded corners protect car interiors and home décor.

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