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The New Age Pet Habitat n Home InnPlace Dog Crate and Table resembles a Mission-style end table for your living room, but it also serves as a great place for your pet. It features brushed stainless steel spindles in the door and sides for added safety. This piece also features eco-friendly construction and has a door latch to keep secure. Easy, tool-free assembly is required. Simply choose from available size options.
We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
Researching your options will be the next step, and I've done a ton of legwork for you with the above list of twenty best dog travel crates, listing their specifications and the modes of travel they are best used for. These travel dog crates are all safe, comfortable choices for your canine, but you'll have to find out if they meet the traveling guidelines that you need to follow and pick the right size after measuring your dog.
A home for your furry friend that fits seamlessly within your home, this furniture-style crate is a must-have for the savvy pet owner. Crafted from ash wood, it functions as an end table, featuring ample space to stage table lamps, potted plants, and more, while open area down below has everything your pet needs to settle in, including a mat and ventilation windows. Rust- and rot-resistant, this essential is also easy to clean with a removable top.
Housebreak your dog in style and with ease when you employ the Petmaker 2 Door Foldable Dog Crate Cage. This feature-loaded crate is constructed with plastic and steel, folds for storage ease, and includes two distinct doors, a divider panel for adjusting the crate length as your dog grows, a removable plastic tray, and more. It's the crate option that grows as your favorite canine does.
A crate is an important thing to have for a pet. It enables them to travel more easily, and can help when it comes to training. This crate, made of manufactured wood with a solid wood finish and steel caging, allows you to bring an important part of your pet's life with you, while staying stylish. Rust-resistant and designed to be longer lasting, it comes with a black slide out tray for easy cleaning – just wipe it down. This crate comes in a variety of sizes based on the weight of your pet.

Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.

You’ll also want to be sure your dog is comfortable while contained. Some are soft dog carriers that your dog will love cozying up against. Others are hard-sided dog carriers made with wire or plastic, adding rigidity, but cutting down on comfort. Whether made of hard or soft materials, a soft dog mat can make all the difference. Look for a dog carrier with a mat. Or if you’d rather chose your own dog mat, purchased separately, be sure to select one that fits well so it can’t shift as your dog moves about.
There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
Once your dog is hanging out in her closed crate without signs of stress, it’s time to lengthen her stay. Use a favorite toy or treat to encourage her to enter the crate, then close it. Hang out by the crate for several minutes, then go into a different room for a few minutes so she gets used to the idea of staying in the crate alone. When you return, don’t open the crate immediately. Instead, sit with her again for a few more minutes and then open the door.Keep increasing the time as you do this until your dog is able to stay in the locked crate for half an hour without your presence. When she’s able to do this, she’s ready for you to leave her for short periods and possibly even sleep in the closed crate overnight. Make sure you keep the crate relatively nearby for overnight stays though. Puppies usually need to go to the bathroom overnight and you’ll want to be able to let her out.
Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.

Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.
Another thing: Once they start doing something negative it can become a habit, and it is hard to break them of it. Yet they can’t seem to do good things by habit unless you give them treats *sigh*. Our dog got into the habit a few months ago of pooping and peeing in his crate every day. We had to keep to the potty schedule AND let him roam more. It’s all a power struggle. I call it revenge, and dog lovers will call it anxiety at being crated. I don’t care. I just don’t like it!

How big is your crate compared to the dog? Typically dogs will not use the bathroom where they sleep if it means no matter where in the crate they go it will be touching them. If you have a crate that allows the dog to sit and lay down a decent bit away from it’s poo then it wont care and it will use the potty in the crate. Make sure the crate is the right size for the dog or at least get big fluffy blankets and pillows to block off a large portion of the crate and make sort of a wall so that if she does go to the bathroom it will be right in her face or on her if she moves an inch.
Her situation is not unique. Your (and others)crate training procedure assumes that the dog has an established room where he’s used to hanging out with the family and that you’ve had him/her for a while. Bull! You have to start this procedure on the very day you bring the puppy home. Otherwise, the puppy will get used to being in your bed, will start a bad habit of peeing on the floor and learn that barking and yipping through the night brings rewards. Please update your method to show how it’s done on day 1, not over time!! Thank You.
I just got my crate in today, I pulled it out of the box and put it right back in to return for a refund. It is a peace of junk. I guess they ran out of tops because they used a side panel with a door for the top. The metal pan is bent I have never seen locks like this before. It's flimsy and cheap. I have 4 boxers and already have 3 crates set up, I got this one to move my 6month old to a bigger crate. I would not trust his life to this crate, I honestly am scared he would get hurt or kill his self in this crate. I'm only giving 1 star because I have to give something or I would give it 0 stars! I've asked to return and refund it better not be decided but if it is this crate will see my trash, I've already ordered a better one.
Plastic crates are maybe not the first choice for an in-home crate as they provide less visibility to the pup that calls it home, however, if you plan to do quite a bit of travel by plane, this is a great option as all airlines require this type of crate to transport your animal. Plastic crates are also great for pups that need a little more security, or for a home that has a higher level of activity (think on-the-go kiddos), as it gives your pup a bit more privacy.
Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.

My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks


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