Never leave a puppy in his crate all day; he needs several bathroom breaks, as well as play and feeding times. Even though he won’t want to soil his sleeping area, if he is in there for extremely long stretches, he just might. (He can’t help it!) And if he does, it is because his owner has neglected his responsibility, not because the dog has misbehaved.
Choose a well-ventilated crate that is large enough for your puppy to stand up, lie down, and turn around. Remember that your puppy’s crate will have to grow as he does, so purchase a crate that is appropriate for your dog’s expected full-grown size, and use a divider to make the crate smaller for the time being. Many crates available at pet-supply stores include dividers.
Still, some puppies may have a harder time adjusting to the crate than others. Another common mistake is to expect your pup to love the crate right away. If your new pet is really crate-averse, try a new type of crate. Some dogs may prefer wire crates so they can still see their environment, while others may be the exact opposite. Also, try putting the crate in a different place. Some dogs may prefer their crate in the center of the family action while others might like it in a quieter corner of the house.
The Precision Pet Crate is the perfect choice for anyone that loves to rough it on a camping trip while bring their pet along to join in on the fun. It includes ground stakes to secure it to the ground, just like a tent. We love that this option makes camping trips easier so you and your pet can enjoy spending time together without worrying about their crate becoming wet or moldy.
After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
If you have an SUV or van that opens from the back and dogs that aren’t always clean when they get in the car, you may want a dog crate that lets you load your dogs directly into the back. This effective crate is designed to fit two crates in the back of your vehicle so that two dogs can travel in comfort and safety, while enjoying the view out the back.
When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.
Crates don't have to be dreary affairs – just take a look at this design, for instance! Doubling as a credenza, it's a perfect pick for housing Fido as well as completing your living room look. Crafted from birch, it features a streamlined design in-line with modern aesthetics. A latch lock and ventilation bars keep Fido secure and cozy, while rust-, odor-, and stain-resistant qualities make this design a no-brainer for finishing out pet-friendly ensembles.

I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.

Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.

Still, some puppies may have a harder time adjusting to the crate than others. Another common mistake is to expect your pup to love the crate right away. If your new pet is really crate-averse, try a new type of crate. Some dogs may prefer wire crates so they can still see their environment, while others may be the exact opposite. Also, try putting the crate in a different place. Some dogs may prefer their crate in the center of the family action while others might like it in a quieter corner of the house.
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?

Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.
Welcome to Dog Tales, a series that looks into the lives of our favorite dogs and their favorite furniture. Today we’re sitting down with Joey, the bulldog, to hear his story about how he fell in with the wrong crowd as a puppy, and how time in the dog crate helped him become a changed bulldog. In this interview, Joey hopes other young dogs can learn from his mistakes in order to avoid doing time in the dog cage:
This carrier is made of a durable luggage-grade nylon outside and is ultra plush polyester inside. A padded shoulder strap and handle are included so that you can easily carry your pup however you like. The bedding that comes with this crate is washable, and the foam liner is water-resistant, so you know you will have this crate until your pup is grown and much longer.

The Variocage is more of a machine than just a crate. Although it may have a slightly off-putting appearance, this powerful crate is designed to take the harshest punishment imaginable without a scratch. With hydraulic locks, thick metal bars, and even an emergency escape hatch, this crate is an impressive bit of handiwork. It has been proven sturdy in all different types of crash tests, and comes in sizes for any size dog.
If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.
The Midwest Homes For Pets Ovation Single Door Pet Crate is perfect for travelling with your pets. It has a hard-sided frame that makes it durable. The pet crate is made from steel, which provides sturdiness and makes it last longer. It is available in an exquisite black finish that enhances its aesthetic appeal. The pet crate is available in multiple sizes, letting you choose the one that best suits your pet. The rust- and stain-resistant features make it ideal for outdoor use. Being...

This crate is a piece of junk -- literally. We bought it for our very calm and docile Irish Setter. In less than two hours, he had completely destroyed the gate and had the cheap bars pointing in every direction and was at the door to the garage to greet us. The spot welds were worthless as it came apart very easily. When I contacted the seller about the crate, they responded that they were sorry about problems with the "table" and would replace it if I paid to send it back! I wrote back that it was an inferior product, why would I want another one and that I expected a full refund and a return label. I even included pictures of the gate. Now they tell me that they won't take it back because it has been damaged?? HELLO! Why do you think I am returning it. I would not buy a single thing from this vendor -- RUN don't walk away from all their products!! I intend to call amazon directly about this vendor! In less than 2 hours it was destroyed!!

On the fourth day with an 8-9 week old Siberian Husky pup, and I’m just going to say it now: It gets better! I’m 15, he’s my first pup, and.. He wouldn’t touch the crate at first, and on the first day he actually had it too large. I made it much smaller, played games of “find the treat!” and have a cheese stuffed kong in there, and now he’s steadily getting used to it. Never close the door on him when he’s first exploring and checking it out, he should be free to accept it as his own place! He was sleeping outside the crate at night, now is slowly getting introduced… truthfully, I’m tired and hoping he’ll be able to make it through the night soon ^^; never has accidents in the room unless bladder is full and he can’t help it. Immediately cleaned when it does. But he’s still a little anxious for now. Hoping to ease him in soon- don’t give up!
Frisco Heavy Duty Double Door Dog Crate provides your pup with a space of his own when you’re away or when you have company. It’s a strong and durable crate that provides safety and comfort. It also features two doors with a three lock system for extra security. And it has an independent pan stop which can be removed without opening the door. It’s available is an array of sizes, including extra-large dog crate size, so there’s definitely a perfect one to fit your furry friend.
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