There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
Once your dog is hanging out in her closed crate without signs of stress, it’s time to lengthen her stay. Use a favorite toy or treat to encourage her to enter the crate, then close it. Hang out by the crate for several minutes, then go into a different room for a few minutes so she gets used to the idea of staying in the crate alone. When you return, don’t open the crate immediately. Instead, sit with her again for a few more minutes and then open the door.Keep increasing the time as you do this until your dog is able to stay in the locked crate for half an hour without your presence. When she’s able to do this, she’s ready for you to leave her for short periods and possibly even sleep in the closed crate overnight. Make sure you keep the crate relatively nearby for overnight stays though. Puppies usually need to go to the bathroom overnight and you’ll want to be able to let her out.

Do you like things in your house to look a certain way? Tired of unattractive pet crates? Look no further than this one: crafted from solid wood and metal, it looks like a credenza but acts like a crate. It features crown molding on the top and a solidly-hued finish for a traditional look, and is accented by metal bars so your pet can look out. It's also odor-, rust-, and stain-resistant.
After she’s willing to enter the crate, your next goal is to get her comfortable with staying inside for extended lengths of time. One of the best ways to do this (and create a positive association with the crate) is to start putting her food in the crate.If possible, you want to place the food at the back of the crate so that your dog goes all the way in. Some dogs may not be willing to do this, though, so you can start with the food just inside the crate and slowly move it back with successive meals.
Still, some puppies may have a harder time adjusting to the crate than others. Another common mistake is to expect your pup to love the crate right away. If your new pet is really crate-averse, try a new type of crate. Some dogs may prefer wire crates so they can still see their environment, while others may be the exact opposite. Also, try putting the crate in a different place. Some dogs may prefer their crate in the center of the family action while others might like it in a quieter corner of the house.
If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
Show it to the dog, let it smell and taste the treat, and then toss it inside the crate and shut the door, with the puppy outside the crate and the treat on the inside. That shows that an absolutely scrumptious puppy treat is inside, out of paw-reach. And after the pup has begged and scratched and whined to get inside, open the door and let it get the toy inside the crate. Allow your pup to chew and enjoy it for five minutes with the door shut and the dog remaining in the crate. Some pups settle down and enjoy their treat with no fanfare. Others throw a fit and want out. So if your puppy fusses let it out, but lock the treat back inside. You’re teaching the dog that wonderful things can be found inside the crate. Most pups learn to tolerate the door shut at least as long as they have something to munch.
I wish I would have seen the most recent review. Our puppy, key word 4 month old puppy, was able to destroy this defective and cheap product on its third use. We have used many other kennels with this dog and another adult and never had problems before. The seller is expecting me to pay return shipping on a defect item that is now trash so that I can get a refund. Do not buy this product or from this seller. This is definitely not meant for XL dogs as it states since a puppy was able to wreck it.

Welcome to Dog Tales, a series that looks into the lives of our favorite dogs and their favorite furniture. Today we’re sitting down with Joey, the bulldog, to hear his story about how he fell in with the wrong crowd as a puppy, and how time in the dog crate helped him become a changed bulldog. In this interview, Joey hopes other young dogs can learn from his mistakes in order to avoid doing time in the dog cage:
New World Folding Metal Crate – A decent alternative to MidWest metal crates is this from New World. As with all metal dog cages, there's little difference in their design, however, MidWest crates are all superior, which explains their insane popularity among pet owners. The only reason to choose New World crate is if you want less features in your dog crate (possibly for less complications?)
- Free Shipping offer is not valid cat litter, dog litter, ice melter, wild bird food; live fish, rock and sand, ocean water, crystals and salt; aquatic gravel and accents; crickets, live and frozen food. Cat litter, dog litter, wild bird food, live & frozen food and oversized items may incur an additional per-item shipping & handling fee or surcharge. Shipping to Alaska, Hawaii, Puerto Rico, the Virgin Islands or P.O. Boxes will result in a surcharge. This is based on your default shopping address.
We purchase this for our German Shepard for when we are not home. He now a little over a year and still not able to be out when not home. This size is huge and makes me feel better when I am at work and he is in his cage. He is comfortable in it with his bed and all his toys. He has tons of room to move around, straight up straight and comfortable. He is bigger than he would probably need but he is happy and make me happy that he has room to play if wanted to. Love the two doors so can be put in a location. Assembly was pretty easy. Need two people to go fast by I did by my self and used a chair to assist me. Would buy again if need be.

I’ve never crate trained before, this is all new to me. My new puppy pees the bed when I let her sleep with me and she needs to be in the crate while I’m at work for 4 to 5 hours. She likes her crate and wont potty in it, but cries at night. I think she just needs to potty during the night like I do. I’m going to try taking her out every time I go pee and putting her back in. When she stops peeing the my bed at night she can sleep with me. I’ve never had a puppy pee my bed at night before, but she’s wat too small to jump down and up by hersel, and not yet house broken. Other than that she’s great, and this artical isn’t all wrong. Dogs dont like to potty where they sleep and eat, and they are pack animals so they usually sleep together. I feel bad making her sleep alone right now.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
I’m sorry you’re having this experience, training a young dog can be difficult and frustrating especially a male dog. He is 100% mad for being in the crate too long, dogs need to exercise and socialize. Try giving him positive attention and toys as a treat, as well as walking him until he’s tired. I have had many dogs over my life, I even ran an unofficial animal rescue when I was younger. I have never crate trained before but I know dog behavior. You need to show love and dominance to your puper. He needs to respect you and your husband as higher in the hierarchy than him, at the same time he craves attention and love. Showing dominance isn’t always punishment. When he does something wrong speak in a firm low tone, growl even bare your teeth, dogs also bite and dry hump to show dominance. When he’s being good, be happy and excited, play and cuddle. Toys can be an effective treat if he likes a particular type more than others. As far as the crate goes, try feeding him in there with the door open, put a bed in there. Don’t use it to discipline, he will hate it and act up like he is. Boy dogs tend to be more difficult than girl dogs and you need to be more dominant. Neutering will help, but you need to let him socialize with you and only use the crate when you absolutely can’t be with him. Dogs are pack animals they need attention and need set rules wether they are small or large breeds. Remember he is not a bad boy, he’s just doing bad things. If you are allergic to him try changing his diet, if a clean meal plan doesn’t work he will need to be rehomed. I hope the best for you and your puper.
Variocages heavy dog travel cage is not a popular option, mostly due to its large price tag and the fact that very few dogs and pet owners need such type of travel crate. That said, these indestructible dog cages look like something from Jurassic Park and are the only crates that are rated using government safety standards for the protection they provide during accidents. That means that they passed the front, rear and rollover crash tests. Also, all models include an emergency escape as an additional safety measure. This crate really is a must have for any dog owner that frequently travels with their pet in the car.
Save 5% when you buy online and pick up in store. Offer valid online only. Transaction total is prior to taxes & after discounts are applied. Offer valid on select merchandise when choosing In-Store Pickup. Savings will automatically reflect in the shopping cart with the purchase of qualifying merchandise. Maximum value $150. Offer not valid on gift cards, gift certificates, previous purchases, charitable donations, veterinary diet, RX medications or vaccines and may exclude all or select items from the following brands: Advantage®, API®, AquaClear®, Aqueon®, AvoDerm®, Blue Buffalo®, CatMouse, Cesar®, Comfort Zone®, Chuckit!®, Dog MD™, Eukanuba®, Fluval®, FRONTLINE®, FURminator®, Greenies®, Great Choice®, High Tech Pet®, Hill’s® Ideal Balance™, IRIS, Hill’s® Science Diet®, Hill’s® Prescription Diet®, iFamCare™, Jackson Galaxy, JW Pets, K9 advantix®, KAYTEE®, KONG®, Kurgo®, Majestic Pet, Marineland®, MidWest Homes for Pets, Muse®, Natural Balance®, NATURE'S RECIPE®, Nature’s Variety®, NaturVet®, Nulo, Nutro™, Nutro™ Max®, Nutro™ Ultra™, Old Mother Hubbard, Omega™ One, Oxbow, Pedigree®, Pendleton, Pet Gear, Petmate, PetSafe®, Pioneer Pet, Precision Pet, PureBites®, Purina® Pro Plan®, Redbarn, Royal Canin®, Sentry®, Simple Solution, Solvit, Snoozer, Sunbeam®, Super Pet®, Temptations™, Tetra®, Thundershirt, Trixie Pet, Vittle Vault, Wellness®, World's Best Cat Litter, XPOWER, Zuke's®. Offer may not be combined with other promotional offers or discounts. Terms and conditions of this offer are subject to change at the sole discretion of PetSmart. Offer valid on PetSmart.com through July 8, 2019 @ 6:30 am EST.
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