Texascustomkennels crafted a beautiful piece of furniture tailored to our needs in our home. The craftsmanship that Robert and his team showed in crafting this kennel far exceeded my expectations. Robert gave speedy and excellent customer service in the creation process of understanding our vision for our custom kennel. Robert stayed in contact throughout the ordering process to the delivery process ensuring that the kennel was delivered in good condition. Thank you sooo much Robert and team we love our texascustomkennel!!!
I was thinking about getting a small dog. After reading dog owner comments I’ve changed my mind. All this emotional problem that the dogs hav and their owner trying desperately to solve them. Whew….my kids are grown. I don’t want to spend time trying to figure out a dogs nervous hang ups. I’ll just stick with my happy parakeets. They don’t seem to have emotional hang ups.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.
Finally, you'll want to be sure to check with the travel agency (if you're using one) and all locations where you will be staying to make sure that both pets and the type of crate you're taking are allowed. Remember to ask if they have unique crate specifications. This is particularly true for airlines, because each airline has their own guidelines, but the same can be said for every bus service, train service, and hotels. Planning ahead could save you from dealing with unnecessary issues during your travels.
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.
All of Petmate plastic travel dog crates, including this one, come in a variety of sizes to fit most dog breeds, although you'll be hard pressed to find one for a large breed (mostly, it's for small to medium dogs). The wire doors of these crates lock shut with a chrome squeeze door latch. The crates are shipped as two half shells and are very easy to assemble. They come with no-rust plastic wing nuts. These crates are also equipped with side air vents.

You’ll also want to be sure your dog is comfortable while contained. Some are soft dog carriers that your dog will love cozying up against. Others are hard-sided dog carriers made with wire or plastic, adding rigidity, but cutting down on comfort. Whether made of hard or soft materials, a soft dog mat can make all the difference. Look for a dog carrier with a mat. Or if you’d rather chose your own dog mat, purchased separately, be sure to select one that fits well so it can’t shift as your dog moves about.
The best dog kennels should serve multiple purposes for you and your dog. They should be durable and also easy to assemble and to disassemble when on the go, see our dog carriers for options like this. Whether you’re off on your next adventure or having company over for dinner, shop the best dog kennels and dog crates here on Chewy to best suit your needs. In addition to dog crates and furniture, Chewy has low prices on all your dog supplies including dog food, dog treats and more. Trust Chewy, for your online pet supplies.
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