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Does he go pee outside at all for you? If so, be sure to give him lots of praise when he does. Say, “good boy!” and pet him a lot. If there is a pattern to him going potty in his crate, try to change when you take him out or for how long. For example, does he always go in his crate right when you get inside? If so, stay outside a little longer. Does he go 20 minutes after you come inside? Try taking him out again after 20 minutes.
With all of its great features, this heavy duty dog cage is not without its faults, and the main issue is that it's difficult to put together. Unlike metal dog crates like MidWest iCrate, the MIM Safe Variocage dog travel cage needs to be assembled from scratch which takes time, effort and understanding. These dog crates come in 14 changeable sizes to fit most dogs, and they come in four different models. This gives you a better chance at finding a suitable fit for your vehicle or one that will pass the guidelines for the method of transportation that you will be taking.
Aspen Pet Pet Porter Plastic Kennel – This is a great alternative to Petmate's best dog travel crate because Aspen Pet offers larger sizes than Petmate ever has, with dogs up to 90-100 lbs. You still can't fit a very large breed here, but medium dogs won't have any problems, provided you can pick them up. Aspen Pet travel crate is, however, more than twice as expensive due to large size.
There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
Once your puppy accepts the crate as a fact of puppy life, you can move the crate to a more acceptable spot in the house. A place next to your own bed will let the puppy sleep in its own spot but near your familiar smells and presence. That also offers you a more private area to seclude it, when necessary, from activities in the living area or kitchen that might keep your dog overstimulated.
Once you’ve decided that crate training is for you, and which crate suits your canine companion best, it’s time to look at the actual process of crate training your pup. While the length of time it takes to crate train depends on your individual animal, his or her attitude, age, and past experiences, one thing’s for sure: you always want your dog to associate the crate with something pleasant. And even with the best dogs, baby steps are the best way to make this happen.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
Now that said, it sounds like your pup does not like being crated for long periods of time. This is his way of letting you know. A couple hours here and there is not what they want. They want it all, to roam your home for hours and hours. Sorry. My oldest told me that she read dogs will mess their crate because they know you have to clean it and they will be taken out (which is why i left my dog in the crate while I cleaned it). They will also step in their crap because they know they will get a bath..a sure way of getting out and getting some affection, since you will be obliged to hold and scrub the dog. It is frustrating to say the least. And yes after the poop we had to bathe him. My husband did that, while I cleaned the cage.
I'm very happy with this crate's size. One thing I didn't notice was that it does require some assembly (not super hard, but it does take 2 people); I thought it was going to be like my 48" crate that folds. The quality is awesome, especially for the price. I'm very impressed with the Frisco line of products overall, the price is unbeatable. The shipping for Chewy is always great and ofcourse free for a purchase like this, I'm a happy camper.
Keep your furry best friend safe in this dog crate. Designed for extra small dogs (10 lbs or less), this piece is crafted of metal. Featuring a latch closure type on the door, with a bolt lock, it is rust, odor, and stain resistant, as well as flea and dust mite resistant, portable, and includes a slide-out tray for easy clean-up. This collapsible piece requires a quick assembly upon arrival, with no tools needed.
The best dog kennels should serve multiple purposes for you and your dog. They should be durable and also easy to assemble and to disassemble when on the go, see our dog carriers for options like this. Whether you’re off on your next adventure or having company over for dinner, shop the best dog kennels and dog crates here on Chewy to best suit your needs. In addition to dog crates and furniture, Chewy has low prices on all your dog supplies including dog food, dog treats and more. Trust Chewy, for your online pet supplies.
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