A must-have for any dog owner, the crate can be used as a bed, to keep them safe during car trips, or even a training tool. This essential design is crafted from steel and features two doors that can be locked for safety as well as protective rubber feet that safeguard your floors from scuffs. A divider panel lets you allot space according to a growing puppy's needs, while a plastic pan provides an easy-to-clean surface in case of accidents.
Another feature that I like is the fact that it has a top, side and front door for easy accessibility. The EliteField 3-Door soft dog crate is also equipped with two convenient accessory pockets. It has a strong steel tube frame and is very well ventilated just like most types of soft dog crates out there. EliteField travel dog crates come in several different sizes and will fit majority of dogs except for extra small or extra large breeds. You can also pick from a ton of different crate colors.
Most dogs love to ride in the car. The wind rushing by carries all kinds of interesting smells that your dog just can’t take in quickly enough, while every stop gives your dog a chance to take in an interesting scene. Add to this the fact that usually going in the car means your dog is going to a fun destination, and it makes perfect sense that being in the car would be a very exciting thing for your dog.
Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 
Wire, metal crates are a top pick for crate training for several reasons: Their mesh-like, collapsible structure makes them easy to disassemble and transport, and, when constructed, provides a high level of visibility and ventilation for your pup while in the crate. Like plastic crates, metal, wire crates are also easy to clean out should your pup have an accident in their home. Sturdy and often escape proof, these crates make a great option for growing dogs as you can purchase a larger size and easily close off the extra space with a divider while they’re smaller, removing it or moving it as they grow.
A crate is a great way to give your pup a perfect spot to curl up and snooze, while also helping you train them to understand boundaries. But there's no reason that crate can't deliver on-trend style as well! Perfect for an understated accent that can double as an end table, this piece is crafted from wood with a white finish. Slim bars round this piece out with abundant ventilation, sure to help your pup keep cool. A latch closure helps keep the front-facing door closed when you need it shut.
Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
As a pet parent, one of the first purchases you will likely make is a dog crate. The reason is simple—they offer your canine a cozy retreat that’s convenient and in some cases, able to be transported anywhere! With proper training, dog crates can help your furry pal control their bladder and keep them from chewing furniture. But when it comes to knowing which crate is best, that can be tough. To help, we’re going to tell you all about wire dog crates so you can make an informed decision for your canine.
×

We read thousands of reviews! Here are the best in each category:

Pet Kennel

Foldable Crate Metal Crate
Pet Kennel
Foldable dog crate
metal crate
pet kennel foldable dog crate metal crate

We did the research for you so you won't have to!

All our recommended products have received 4.5 stars overall.

Click on any of the buttons above to check them out!