AmazonBasics Black Soft-Sided Carrier – Once again, Amazon offers its alternative to the best travel dog crate for a cheaper price. This time, it may well be worth it unlike with the plastic travel dog crates. The design of AmazonBasics pet carrier is much more simple, but the materials used are good quality and if you don't require expandable storage space, you can get this one for half of what PetPeppy costs.
Dog kennels, crates, and accessories create a safe, dedicated space for your furry friend to settle into at home, a visit away, or anywhere between. Our wide selection provides secure containment while catering to your canine’s natural instinct to den. From housebreaking your new puppy to keeping the furniture chew-free, crates and kennels can be an effective training tool, while preventing destructive habits from developing.
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Favorite Top Load Portable Carrier – Pet owners with very small and teacup dog breeds who are looking to take short trips, this can be the winner. Favorite's best dog travel crate alternative has a good looking design and is the cheapest crate of all listed here. However, it's only good if you're not traveling long distances since the materials appear to be low quality and I wouldn't trust this on a plane.
The crate allows you to travel with your pet in style. Crafted from steel, it's both rust- and stain-resistant, as well as leak-proof and odor-resistant, ensure your pet has a hygienic place to rest. Its front door can be easily locked with a latch, and a removable slide-out tray makes it easy to clean. This crate also comes equipped with a handle that makes it portable and easy to travel with.
Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet Wow, this crate is huge! We have three St Berdoodles and they were outgrowing the XL size crates I had purchased on Amazon (42”, I believe) at 10 months old. So, we purchased two of these ginormous crates. The pups have plenty of room. Only problem with the crates themselves is finding space in our home to put them. *the packaging and assembly nearly changed my review. The styrofoam broke apart everywhere, was all over the crate, floor, etc. quite challenging to put together, also. You need two people and a very large space to put it together in. And you need to put it together in the room it’s going in. We still haven’t put the 2nd one together because we aren’t sure where it will fit yet. … more
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.

Her situation is not unique. Your (and others)crate training procedure assumes that the dog has an established room where he’s used to hanging out with the family and that you’ve had him/her for a while. Bull! You have to start this procedure on the very day you bring the puppy home. Otherwise, the puppy will get used to being in your bed, will start a bad habit of peeing on the floor and learn that barking and yipping through the night brings rewards. Please update your method to show how it’s done on day 1, not over time!! Thank You.

When measuring the length of your dog, you should begin at the base of the neck and measure to the base of the tail. Add 3 inches to this and that should be the minimum crate length that you should be looking for. To measure their height, simply start at the ground and measure to the top of their shoulders. Add 3 inches to this measurement to get the minimum crate height you should be looking for.
How big is your crate compared to the dog? Typically dogs will not use the bathroom where they sleep if it means no matter where in the crate they go it will be touching them. If you have a crate that allows the dog to sit and lay down a decent bit away from it’s poo then it wont care and it will use the potty in the crate. Make sure the crate is the right size for the dog or at least get big fluffy blankets and pillows to block off a large portion of the crate and make sort of a wall so that if she does go to the bathroom it will be right in her face or on her if she moves an inch.
If you have anyone else in your car, they may not appreciate your dog jumping all over their laps to get the best angle on whatever is going on outside of the window. Your dog can quickly turn a pleasant car ride into a very uncomfortable one for your guests. While they may be nice enough to not say anything about it, they may not want to go with you and your dog on your next outing.
I recently adopted a 7 week old German Shepherd puppy and want to crate train him. I take him out every couple of hours to use the restroom and play with him. When I take him outside he’ll use the restroom and we praise him. However, as soon as we bring him in the house to play he eliminates randomly. They are little spots of pee. I suggested to my family that we only play with our pup outside so we don’t have these accidents. I’m afraid I’m confusing him, because if he’s not in the crate he’s outside. I don’t have experience crate training or house training.

What I’m trying to understand is how do I keep puppy safe/keep from potting at night if I don’t keep him in the crate at night? We brought our puppy home a week ago and he’s slept in the crate since the first night. Outside of the first night, he’s slept through (10p-6a). I stayed downstairs with him the first 3 or 4 nights and moved him further into the kitchen each night. I’ve moved back up to my bedroom the last 3 nights. He yelps 5-10 minutes and then goes to sleep. Occasionally I put him in the crate during the day (preparing meals, using the bathroom). Am I doing more harm than good because he wasn’t introduced more gradually?
I had a amazing experience with Texas Custom Kennels. Robert is very friendly, professional. He was very patient with me due to I kept changing my custom order. The Kennel is WOW. It is so beautiful and looks great with my home cabinets and furniture. Thank you so very much for building such a great kennel. I love it and my dog is loving so much too. I highly recommend to everyone.
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
Our collection offers the best dog crates available for wide-ranging applications. Our dog travel crates are designed specifically to make it easy for you and your pet to get around. We offer light- and heavyweight styles for different travel scenarios, from errand running to long-distance hauls into the backcountry. Thoughtful engineering makes our travel dog crates a cinch to to set up and transport, offering a pop-up home-away-from-home for your dog wherever you go. We’re proud to say that ours are the best travel crates for dogs on the market.
The best dog crates and dog kennels are made to comfortably fit the size of your pup. And they’re great dog travel supplies and dog potty training supplies to go along with them too. Picking the right kennel for your dog can make all the difference. The best crates become your dog’s den. And a dog crate can also help reduce the amount of accidents around the house as well as general separation anxiety symptoms. His crate can become a place where he feels a sense of security, solitude and peace. It can be a good idea to add toys and a fluffy pet bed for added relaxation. There are several types of crates that can be used including plastic dog crates, soft-sided dog crates, wooden dog crates, fabric dog crates, and metal dog pens. Chewy also carries different products to make your pup more comfortable in their crate including crate mats as well as crate covers.
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