It is a little flimsy but it isn’t being moved all over the house so it’s perfect for my girl. She out grew the one I borrowed so I had to buy a new one and it had to be bigger and cheap. The three doors don’t really make sense but whatever. The handle was broken in the box but I didn’t plan on using it and threw it away. It would be a five star if the crate wasn’t so flimsy. It did open and set up quickly.
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My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
Choose a well-ventilated crate that is large enough for your puppy to stand up, lie down, and turn around. Remember that your puppy’s crate will have to grow as he does, so purchase a crate that is appropriate for your dog’s expected full-grown size, and use a divider to make the crate smaller for the time being. Many crates available at pet-supply stores include dividers.
As a pet parent, one of the first purchases you will likely make is a dog crate. The reason is simple—they offer your canine a cozy retreat that’s convenient and in some cases, able to be transported anywhere! With proper training, dog crates can help your furry pal control their bladder and keep them from chewing furniture. But when it comes to knowing which crate is best, that can be tough. To help, we’re going to tell you all about wire dog crates so you can make an informed decision for your canine.
Once your puppy accepts the crate as a fact of puppy life, you can move the crate to a more acceptable spot in the house. A place next to your own bed will let the puppy sleep in its own spot but near your familiar smells and presence. That also offers you a more private area to seclude it, when necessary, from activities in the living area or kitchen that might keep your dog overstimulated.
If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.
You want your pets to be treated like family, and to do that, you have to incorporate their needs to your home decor. This pet crate is here to help. Crafted from solid wood, this piece showcases a planked top perched aloft its bar-designed body. Sharp angles give this piece eye-catching appeal, while its top offers a stage to display a favorite photograph or some holiday decorations. Barn door hinges keep this door on track while a latch design keeps it closed.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.
My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.

Choose a well-ventilated crate that is large enough for your puppy to stand up, lie down, and turn around. Remember that your puppy’s crate will have to grow as he does, so purchase a crate that is appropriate for your dog’s expected full-grown size, and use a divider to make the crate smaller for the time being. Many crates available at pet-supply stores include dividers.
When measuring the length of your dog, you should begin at the base of the neck and measure to the base of the tail. Add 3 inches to this and that should be the minimum crate length that you should be looking for. To measure their height, simply start at the ground and measure to the top of their shoulders. Add 3 inches to this measurement to get the minimum crate height you should be looking for.

A crate is an important thing to have for a pet. It enables them to travel more easily, and can help when it comes to training. This crate, made of manufactured wood with a solid wood finish and steel caging, allows you to bring an important part of your pet's life with you, while staying stylish. Rust-resistant and designed to be longer lasting, it comes with a black slide out tray for easy cleaning – just wipe it down. This crate comes in a variety of sizes based on the weight of your pet.

The crate allows you to travel with your pet in style. Crafted from steel, it's both rust- and stain-resistant, as well as leak-proof and odor-resistant, ensure your pet has a hygienic place to rest. Its front door can be easily locked with a latch, and a removable slide-out tray makes it easy to clean. This crate also comes equipped with a handle that makes it portable and easy to travel with.
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.
This versatile crate functions both as an end table and a safe place for your furry friend to rest when you're out. With a traditional-inspired design, this pet crate is constructed of manufactured wood, with stainless steel hardware and accents. Featuring ventilation windows, and a latch locking mechanism, this piece accommodates medium sized animals (25-50 lbs.). It measures 23.5'' H x 21.65'' W x 35.43'' D. We recommend cleaning by wiping clean with a damp cloth.
As with all dog cages, because it's a metal dog travel crate, it's very easy to clean and it's super durable and strong, which can be the deciding factor for most. It has double doors for front and side access. It also has slide-bolt latches that provide easy entry as well as security. The Midwest Life Stages folding metal crate is surprisingly uncomplicated to set up and put away, since it folds flat. When you consider how you're going to travel, this can be either the best dog travel crate for your trip, or the worst, so make sure you know where the crate is going to go and how it's going to be used.
Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
Welcome to the world of dog ownership..where the reality sucks more than the dream. I have a 16 month old mini schnauzer who was a pain to potty train…and here is the kicker, he STILL will mess in the house and crate. He KNOWS it is wrong to do both as he is “sneaky” about it, and or gives the sad eye look. Just last night he peed the crate and shoved his whole face in it as if to”cover the piss with air”. I slide the tray out and cleaned it with him in the crate. Then I washed my hands and came back to see him in stance and crapping the cage. Why? Why did he do this when he had been taken out, and refused to eat that day? Even better why did he not crap after he peed? Why did he watch me clean his pee and then wait for me to walk away to make another mess? Because he had been crated all day long except to potty and eat. I am in the middle of an allergic reaction to something and wanted to see if keeping him crated would stop the hives. Apparently he was upset from being stuck in a crate all day.
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.

A dog's den should be his castle—a place where he can relax. Frisco crates come with a plastic base pan to cover the wire floor and keep things clean. But you can also add a Frisco Crate Mat to make his den even more comfortable. This quilted fleece bed is made from soft Sherpa material with a foam cushion bottom and thick bolster to make your pet feel at home in his den.


Do you like things in your house to look a certain way? Tired of unattractive pet crates? Look no further than this one: crafted from solid wood and metal, it looks like a credenza but acts like a crate. It features crown molding on the top and a solidly-hued finish for a traditional look, and is accented by metal bars so your pet can look out. It's also odor-, rust-, and stain-resistant.
Choosing the right type of dog travel crate is essential, and will depend on the type of trip you're taking. Are you traveling in car? By plan? By train? Maybe you decide to travel on a motorcycle or even a bicycle. For some, soft sided dog crate may be the ultimate choice, while others will need a metal dog crate. There are many different types of best dog crates for travel that will fit any form of transportation choice.
Texascustomkennels crafted a beautiful piece of furniture tailored to our needs in our home. The craftsmanship that Robert and his team showed in crafting this kennel far exceeded my expectations. Robert gave speedy and excellent customer service in the creation process of understanding our vision for our custom kennel. Robert stayed in contact throughout the ordering process to the delivery process ensuring that the kennel was delivered in good condition. Thank you sooo much Robert and team we love our texascustomkennel!!!
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