I had this problem with my Chihuahua/Yorkie mixed. I moved her kennel by the back door. The backyard is where she uses the bathroom. I allowed her to stay in the yard for one hour per bathroom break. I monitored her intake. I noticed that after each meal she immediately used the bathroom- doing a number 1 and 2. I would never leave her food out because I wouldn’t be able to monitor her bathroom break. I fed her twice to 3xs a day with plenty of treats for using the bathroom outside. I treated her as soo as she walked back in the house- but that’s only if she actually used the bathroom. I hope this helps. House breaking a puppy can be frustrating.
What I’m trying to understand is how do I keep puppy safe/keep from potting at night if I don’t keep him in the crate at night? We brought our puppy home a week ago and he’s slept in the crate since the first night. Outside of the first night, he’s slept through (10p-6a). I stayed downstairs with him the first 3 or 4 nights and moved him further into the kitchen each night. I’ve moved back up to my bedroom the last 3 nights. He yelps 5-10 minutes and then goes to sleep. Occasionally I put him in the crate during the day (preparing meals, using the bathroom). Am I doing more harm than good because he wasn’t introduced more gradually?
If you are going to use a travel crate, which is a great idea for smaller and medium-sized dogs, sizing is important. Like many other aspects of sizing your dog, the weight matters less than the height and length. A thirty-pound dog can be shorter than a twenty pound dog, depending on the breed and age. A good rule of thumb for any dog or animal is to allow them to both stand up and turn around comfortably in their crate. Both plastic and wire crates should have a liner, bed or even a towel along the bottom of it to prevent sliding or pain. Once you have gotten the height and length of your dog, you can find the dimensions of a crate that will suit your needs. You do not want to oversize the crate either, as smaller dogs may attempt to relieve themselves in one side if they can get far away enough from it. Finally, make sure that you have each animal in their own crate. Unless you are transporting very small dogs, such as a litter of puppies, you never want to have dogs sharing a crate during travel due to space limitations and stress.
One dog owner said she actually layed on the ground becide her whining pup. I was thinking that if all you concerned dog owners spent half as much time love and concern with humans as you do with your pets this world might be a better place. Maybe more respect for others and not so much crime. Who knows….maybe humans might like the love from other humans.

If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.

With all of its great features, this heavy duty dog cage is not without its faults, and the main issue is that it's difficult to put together. Unlike metal dog crates like MidWest iCrate, the MIM Safe Variocage dog travel cage needs to be assembled from scratch which takes time, effort and understanding. These dog crates come in 14 changeable sizes to fit most dogs, and they come in four different models. This gives you a better chance at finding a suitable fit for your vehicle or one that will pass the guidelines for the method of transportation that you will be taking.


These dog crates were designed for several reasons. First and foremost, to protect your precious pet from unforeseeable hazards during your absents from home. Their crate is also designed in mind with your existing décor, eliminating those obstructive unsightly folding wire or molded plastic eye sores and replaced with a functional piece of furniture, whether it be a credenza, sideboard, accent table or a new TV console. These crates come in a number of sizes to fit your needs. All dog crates...
The crate allows you to travel with your pet in style. Crafted from steel, it's both rust- and stain-resistant, as well as leak-proof and odor-resistant, ensure your pet has a hygienic place to rest. Its front door can be easily locked with a latch, and a removable slide-out tray makes it easy to clean. This crate also comes equipped with a handle that makes it portable and easy to travel with.

I come home at lunch so she is crated fro 8 am to noon and then again from 1 pm until 3 pm when my son gets home from school. Every day, she has a potty accident (poop) in her crate before I come home at noon. She is a very good pup and loves her crate at night but HATES for me to leave in the morning. I am worried she won’t grow out of pooping in her crate during the day and will continue to be anxious and sad while we are not home. Would it be better for me to leave her in the bathroom with a puppy pads and toys while I go to work since she does well in her crate at night already? I have tried leaving the TV on for her to keep her entertained and feeling less anxious. I have tried leaving the room dark and quiet so she might just sleep. Nothing seems to work. Thanks for any input!

For what it is, PetPeppy is easily the best dog travel carrier compared to others because it's more sturdy and safe for dogs. While no additional sizes are available of this carrier, you can fit a small or small-medium dog into this travel dog crate but note that a lot of dogs find these crates uncomfortable during long trips, therefore it's best for short distance travel and short flights where you can attend to your dog faster.
There's no reason your master suite can't be the master suite of your pet as well! This crate doubles as a table, so it's a perfect accessory for when you want to give your pet a little bit more room in the home, but can't sacrifice surface space. Constructed of eco-friendly rubberwood with a waterproof and absorbent melamine covered floor, this is pet accommodation at its finest. Worried about Terry teething on the wood panels? Don't fret: a secure poly-panel keeps the removable swing-through...
Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.
Still, some puppies may have a harder time adjusting to the crate than others. Another common mistake is to expect your pup to love the crate right away. If your new pet is really crate-averse, try a new type of crate. Some dogs may prefer wire crates so they can still see their environment, while others may be the exact opposite. Also, try putting the crate in a different place. Some dogs may prefer their crate in the center of the family action while others might like it in a quieter corner of the house.
By familiarizing your puppy with a crate early on, you’re not only creating an easy avenue for house training, you’re also allowing them to become comfortable with their future means of transportation. A crate is a great way to transport your pup – whether it’s a short trip to the vet or a big move across country – and by familiarizing your pup with a crate early on, you’ll make travel a lot easier and more comfortable for your canine companion.
This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after This thing is huge and the price was great, but the design makes for a very challenging effort to assemble or move this. While we don't need to move it often - we do like to bring a kennel for road trips or when we have visitors, it's a pain the rear to disassemble and reassemble. It does not collapse and fold flat like every other kennel I've seen - it uses (4) rods in the corners through metal loops in the sides to keep the structure together. The top, sides, and bottoms simply hook together, but this alone can be a frustrating experience. I put it together alone, but I struggle to think two people would make this easier due to frustration and potential marriage counseling required after. To make matters worse, the packaging materials included styrofoam that must have been damaged in transit. The structural foam had dissintegrated causing a snow storm in the house that was very difficult to vaccuum up because of the static charge. Lastly, the crate pieces were bent when they arrived, so the packaging isn't great for shipping. This further complicated assembly because the hooks that connect the pieces saw the bulk of the damage. My dog doesn't challenge the structural integrity of the kennel, but I would guess an ambitious dog can quickly defeat this enclosure. I would not buy this one again if I could go back. In fact, I am looking for another XXL crate to use for trips so I never have to reassemble this one again... It's just not worth the hassle to return this given the price. … more
Whether you’re preparing for a new pup or creating a secure environment, these pet containment solutions come in handy when house training your dog. Many wire dog crates are equipped with divider panels that allow your pet’s space to grow with them. Getting the correct size plays a huge role in how successful you are with crate training. It may seem like a good idea to buy a large wire dog crate but in actuality, your pet may use one side as their bedroom and the other as a bathroom. By providing the right amount of space, your canine is less likely to soil their resting spot.
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