My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
Most crates are made of solid hard plastic or wire mesh; there are advantages to each. While soft-sided pet carriers work great for transport, they may be too small and prove too tempting for chew-aholic pups to work well for safe confinement. Solid plastic crates are generally opaque, so your dog won't be able to see much once it's inside. This can be either a plus or a minus, depending on your dog's need for privacy and the type of household it lives in. Plastic crates are a must if you plan to travel by air: airlines will not allow you to transport your dog in a metal crate. Wire crates offer plenty of air and visibility and are easy to clean. They can also be folded down and put away when not in use, which is a terrific feature for a smaller home. 

Another feature that I like is the fact that it has a top, side and front door for easy accessibility. The EliteField 3-Door soft dog crate is also equipped with two convenient accessory pockets. It has a strong steel tube frame and is very well ventilated just like most types of soft dog crates out there. EliteField travel dog crates come in several different sizes and will fit majority of dogs except for extra small or extra large breeds. You can also pick from a ton of different crate colors.
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
The worst way you can introduce your puppy to the idea of a crate is to bring it home and lock him inside it immediately. People don’t like being trapped against their will, and neither do dogs. Instead, you should initially treat the crate like it’s just another piece of furniture — but one that he can enjoy.To this end, place it in a part of the house that he frequents, add a blanket and a toy or two, and keep the door open. Then back off and give him a chance to explore it. Some dogs will immediately start sniffing around and going into the crate, which is a great sign. If your puppy isn’t quite so bold, encourage him to check it out by placing favorite foods and toys near and inside the crate. The ultimate goal is to get him comfortable with going inside, and this is something that could take days. Be patient with the process.
With a durable metal frame and grab-and-go duffle bag handles, the Pet Life Deluxe 360 Collapsible Pet Crate with Removable Bowl Red ensures ultimate durability and convenience when traveling with your pet. A 360-degree view keeps your pup happy, and an included removable pet bowl keeps him hydrated, too. Thinsulate technology creates an ideal temperature in the crate, and two zippered entrances allow for accessibility.

Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.


• Material: Look for items constructed from a lightweight yet durable frame material such as aluminum or steel. Both options are light enough to make carrying and set up simple. These durable metals will also be able to hold up to the wear and tear exerted on a travel carrier. You’ll also need to make special considerations for pets that like to chew.
Another thing: Once they start doing something negative it can become a habit, and it is hard to break them of it. Yet they can’t seem to do good things by habit unless you give them treats *sigh*. Our dog got into the habit a few months ago of pooping and peeing in his crate every day. We had to keep to the potty schedule AND let him roam more. It’s all a power struggle. I call it revenge, and dog lovers will call it anxiety at being crated. I don’t care. I just don’t like it!

A crate is an important thing to have for a pet. It enables them to travel more easily, and can help when it comes to training. This crate, made of manufactured wood with a solid wood finish and steel caging, allows you to bring an important part of your pet's life with you, while staying stylish. Rust-resistant and designed to be longer lasting, it comes with a black slide out tray for easy cleaning – just wipe it down. This crate comes in a variety of sizes based on the weight of your pet.


We are trying to crate train to avoid separation anxiety. I work from home so my puppy is in my office with me all day. I’ve started to crate train her while I get ready for my day or do cleaning. She whines a lot but we’re at the very early stages. My question is, my husband and I want her to be able to sleep in the bed with us like our last dog did. My husband works nights so he tends to go to bed much later than me, so she hangs out with him until he’s ready to come to bed too, and then she sleeps peacefully until the morning. Are we shooting ourselves in the foot by not crating her at night, or is it okay to just crate train at selected times throughout the day so she can get used to being in there during the rare times when neither of us can be home? I keep her crate in my back office so that if she does whine while my husband is asleep, it doesn’t bother him as much. I also don’t let her out if she’s whining, unless it’s time for her potty break.
My wife and I got a dog bed from Texas Custom Kennels. Robert, the owner, is as brilliant as they come. Amazing customer service, regular progress updates, and the dog bed came out beautiful. His compassion for his customers and craft is easy to see. We live in rural California (off a dirt road that the GPS has trouble finding) so we were worried about delivery. The delivery process was easy. We got an email when it shipped, an email a day before it arrived, and it showed up right on time. Now that the dog bed is our most beautiful piece of furniture in the house, I suppose the custom dog kennel is next... THANK YOU Robert!
When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.
The collapsible design of the Pet Life Lightweight Folding Collapsible Zippered Easy Pet Crate Khaki makes it ideal for traveling and easy pet transport. Your pet has the option of a 360-degree view, or you can close the shades to block outside excitement. A scratchproof Sherpa cushion provides ultimate comfort, able to keep your pet both warm and cool, and can be machine-washed for easy maintenance. A built-in leash holder ensures that your pup stays near his little bed, and the high-tech insulation keeps an ideal temperature. Phenomenal for outdoor ...
A crate is an important thing to have for a pet. It enables them to travel more easily, and can help when it comes to training. This crate, made of manufactured wood with a solid wood finish and steel caging, allows you to bring an important part of your pet's life with you, while staying stylish. Rust-resistant and designed to be longer lasting, it comes with a black slide out tray for easy cleaning – just wipe it down. This crate comes in a variety of sizes based on the weight of your pet.
Do you like things in your house to look a certain way? Tired of unattractive pet crates? Look no further than this one: crafted from solid wood and metal, it looks like a credenza but acts like a crate. It features crown molding on the top and a solidly-hued finish for a traditional look, and is accented by metal bars so your pet can look out. It's also odor-, rust-, and stain-resistant.
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.
It was a little more complicated to put together than the smaller crates, but it's perfect. My lab has to have cruciate ligament surgery and his current crate is too small with the cone. It is large enough for him to freely move around and for me to actually go in there with him to give him attention. It's big and takes up a fair amount of space, but I am very happy with the purchase. Hopefully, it will minimize the difficulty of the 12 week recovery for an active dog!
Dog kennels, crates, and accessories create a safe, dedicated space for your furry friend to settle into at home, a visit away, or anywhere between. Our wide selection provides secure containment while catering to your canine’s natural instinct to den. From housebreaking your new puppy to keeping the furniture chew-free, crates and kennels can be an effective training tool, while preventing destructive habits from developing.
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