Her situation is not unique. Your (and others)crate training procedure assumes that the dog has an established room where he’s used to hanging out with the family and that you’ve had him/her for a while. Bull! You have to start this procedure on the very day you bring the puppy home. Otherwise, the puppy will get used to being in your bed, will start a bad habit of peeing on the floor and learn that barking and yipping through the night brings rewards. Please update your method to show how it’s done on day 1, not over time!! Thank You.

Dogs are naturally den animals. In the wild, a dog’s den is their home, a safe space where he can sleep, retreat, and raise pups without fear of danger, without outside threat. For a domesticated dog, a crate fulfills this natural need for a safe haven. If introduced and used correctly, the crate will be where your dog willingly chooses to sleep, hide when it storms, and quite possibly, lay around in for no other reason other than it’s their very own space.
Just like humans need rules to help us understand our place and our boundaries, so do dogs. Crate training is an excellent way to establish a hierarchy in your home while your pup is still learning what he can and cannot do. By placing your pup in a crate while you’re away, or when you’re at home and can’t be as attentive as you might need to be, you limit their access to your home and circumvent opportunities for your dog to chew your furniture or have an accident on your living room rug. Therefore, when you actually let your pup have free run of your home, it will be at a time when you’re able to reprimand them appropriately for any bad behavior that occurs, and he’ll quickly learn not only that their crate is their very own space, but that the rest of the house is their Alpha’s space.
My boyfriend and I brought home a male Chihuahua when he was 6 weeks old , He is now 10 months and we are still having potty training issues . We have trained him to sleep in his crate through out the night but For the last couple weeks, he will wake up and poop around 6:45 am every morning in his crate even after being taken out !! Sometimes he’ll poop in his crate before we wake up. We set his last potty break at 12 am at night . We stopped giving him treats and water after 8 pm and were still getting the same problem . My boyfriend wakes up at 6:30 am before he goes to work to take him out but he only pees and about 15 minutes after being brought back inside he’ll poop all over his crate and step all over it . We have tried puppy pads in the crate but all he did was rip them up so we stopped using them at 6 months . I am thinking about getting a kennel for him to lay in at night because his crate may be too big for him . We’ve also tried letting him sleep with us during the night and taking him on a potty break at 6:30 am and once were about to leave for work , we put him in his crate and we find him peeing or pooping in the crate . Unfortunately , we had to move his crate to the kitchen because that is the only room where we have hardware floors. ( We use to have his crate in the bedroom with us but he started kicking the black panel out his crate and digging at our carpets and scratching at our walls . ) I take my break from work at 12 pm so hes crated 7:15 am – 12:00 pm and hes always dry when I get home from break then I go back to work 12:30 – 4:30 and when I get home to take him out , hes dry ! I feed him and take him out once I get home and then its play time ! He is fed dinner at 7:45 pm and then hes taken out immediately and he goes potty and then playtime again until 11 pm with his potty break following at 12 am and him going back in the crate for bedtime . I’ve researched and I’ve asked experts but no one seems to have the right answer. We’ve tried putting him on new schedules as well as reducing his crate time through out the day . Please Help !!
Use a smaller crate. However, because your pup is use to peeing freely, transitioning will require more of your attention. You will have to take your pup out for multiple bathroom breaks. Then gradually increase the crate time. All up until your pup can hold its bladder for about 8-9 hours. Giving treats as soon as your pup finish using the bathroom outside, give a favorite treat. I wouldn’t give my pup a treat if she didn’t use the bathroom during her bathroom break. My pup is now 5 months old and the last accident in our home was when she was 2 months old. It was my fault tho. I forgot to take her to the bathroom before taking her upstairs for her bath. She accidentally pooped upstairs. She didn’t know how to use the stairs yet. But she is an awesome pup. I love her. She respects me and what I ask her to do.
There are a number of reasons to crate train your dog. Most puppies and adult dogs feel more secure in a small, enclosed den-like area, and young puppies are especially eager to find a safe place. A carefully-chosen crate and proper crate training can help your puppy discover that a crate is a safe, happy place to spend the night. A youngster should be introduced slowly to the crate when possible and not left unattended longer than the dog is able to "hold it" for potty training. But crate training, when it's done right, can give both you and your dog a feeling of order and security in a complex world.
Once your pup is comfortable entering, exiting, and spending a little time inside the crate – doors open, of course – start feeding your dog their meals inside their new home. Depending on his or her comfort level, place the food all the way at the back (for very comfortable) or around the middle (for dogs that are still a little wary). When your pup is eating inside comfortably, begin closing the door – just while he’s eating – opening immediately after he finishes. From there, work your way up to your pup spending up to 10 minutes in their crate with the door closed after finishing their dinner.
We purchase this for our German Shepard for when we are not home. He now a little over a year and still not able to be out when not home. This size is huge and makes me feel better when I am at work and he is in his cage. He is comfortable in it with his bed and all his toys. He has tons of room to move around, straight up straight and comfortable. He is bigger than he would probably need but he is happy and make me happy that he has room to play if wanted to. Love the two doors so can be put in a location. Assembly was pretty easy. Need two people to go fast by I did by my self and used a chair to assist me. Would buy again if need be.
My 15-week puppy sleeps in her playpen, which I line with pee pads. Instead of peeing on the pee pads (which are away from her bedding), she often pees on her bedding. When I take her out in the morning, she doesn’t pee on the pee pads laid outside her playpen, but dashes about and pees anywhere else. It has been challenging and quite frustrating. Occasionally, she manages to pee on the pee pads, then I give her praise and reward her with treats. But this her behaviour is not consistent. Please help! Thanks
Your dog's size and the mode of transportation you will be taking are the two biggest factors to take into account when choosing the best dog travel crate. Your pet will have to fit comfortably in the carrier without having too much excess room, and the carrier will need to be appropriate for the car, plane, train, or other mode of transportation that you'll be taking as well as easy to transport from location to location.
Finally, you'll want to be sure to check with the travel agency (if you're using one) and all locations where you will be staying to make sure that both pets and the type of crate you're taking are allowed. Remember to ask if they have unique crate specifications. This is particularly true for airlines, because each airline has their own guidelines, but the same can be said for every bus service, train service, and hotels. Planning ahead could save you from dealing with unnecessary issues during your travels.
- The 20% discount applies to your minimum one-time delivery order subtotal of $85. Subtotal refers to the amount of your one-time delivery order before taxes and shipping. The qualifying subtotal excludes any Repeat Delivery order or buy online and pick up in-store orders. All free shipping is based on Standard Shipping rates. P.O. Boxes. Alaska/Hawaii are based on USPS Priority Mail.
If you have anyone else in your car, they may not appreciate your dog jumping all over their laps to get the best angle on whatever is going on outside of the window. Your dog can quickly turn a pleasant car ride into a very uncomfortable one for your guests. While they may be nice enough to not say anything about it, they may not want to go with you and your dog on your next outing.
The Petmate Two Door dog crate for travel is very easy to clean because it's all plastic and, although they are made with heavy duty materials, they are surprisingly lightweight. These pet travel crates are equipped with tie-down holes in all four corners to make them more stable while traveling. They also include a hole so the door can be secured with zip-ties during travel.
As a pet parent, one of the first purchases you will likely make is a dog crate. The reason is simple—they offer your canine a cozy retreat that’s convenient and in some cases, able to be transported anywhere! With proper training, dog crates can help your furry pal control their bladder and keep them from chewing furniture. But when it comes to knowing which crate is best, that can be tough. To help, we’re going to tell you all about wire dog crates so you can make an informed decision for your canine.
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