With a durable metal frame and grab-and-go duffle bag handles, the Pet Life Deluxe 360 Collapsible Pet Crate with Removable Bowl Red ensures ultimate durability and convenience when traveling with your pet. A 360-degree view keeps your pup happy, and an included removable pet bowl keeps him hydrated, too. Thinsulate technology creates an ideal temperature in the crate, and two zippered entrances allow for accessibility.
Your pet’s accessories are an extension of you, which means you have another opportunity to let your style shine. So don’t let Fido sleep in any old crate. This crate is perfect for traditional or contemporary aesthetics, thanks to its classic design and curved details, it can also double as an end table or nightstand. It features a solid bottom half for those who like to chew, a crate pad with machine washable cover, and latch. Crafted from manufactured wood and hardwood veneers, while the...

I broke down and got a pompoo for my 14 yr old daughter. I am getting wonderful help from friends – but very conflicting. One says do not let pup graze – put food in crate – and shut the door. The other says never feed in crate. I tried feeding in crate – but he gets upset – spills food and whines. Now I have a pup who has not eaten and is upset. and I have to wait for the moment that he stops whining to take him out of the crate. I am exhausted and I feel he is in the crate so much already – at night and during the day when I am at work….I want him to enjoy his new family.
This Crate functions both as an elegant end table and a comfortable, safe place for your furry friend to rest when you're out. With its classic design, it is an unobtrusive option for stowing your pets. Crate pad is covered in machine washable luxurious cotton with non-skid bottom to prevent slipping and tufted to prevent filling from shifting. This crate is designed with the style of an end table or night stand that matches with any home decor and functions as a pet bed. This Crate features a...
If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.

When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.

Because your domesticated dog will treat their crate just as a wild dog would treat their den, he will not want to soil their sleeping space. Therefore, you can be sure that, if at all possible, your dog will not have an accident in their crate, so when you let them out of their crate to go outside, he will naturally seize that opportunity to relieve themself. While there are other methods of house training your puppy, this is a very instinctual transition, requiring mainly that you take your puppy out of their crate at reasonable intervals to use the restroom. This way, your puppy will pretty easily, and perceptively, pick up that he is expected to do their business outside, not in.


Arf Pets 3 Door Crate with Strap – Essentially the same type as the EliteField's crate, Arf Pets' dog travel crate is a great alternative with a slightly different design. It's a less popular option among pet owners who travel, but it's available in different sizes and several new color schemes. The only reason to buy Art Pets over EliteField is if you prefer their colors or offered sizes, because the price, materials used and the implemented design features are exactly the same as EliteField's.
Your dog’s safety is in jeopardy when she is not strapped into your car in some way. If you were to get into an accident, your dog would likely be thrown from the vehicle. Secured safely in a crate or harness, however, your dog will stay in the car in the case of a collision. A crate can also offer some protection from impact and debris. You love your dog, and you don’t want to take the risk that she could be injured or killed while you remain safely in your seat, held in by your seatbelt.
The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight collapsible crate is composed of heavy-duty Ballistic Nylon and Mesh with bendable yet sturdy built-in flexible extenders that hook and loop into place and hold up the 2 outer mesh expandable sides. Fully expands on both sides and collapses and folds. Perfect ...  More + Product Details Close

My Fiance and I recently brought home a 10-week old lab-pit mix. She is just the sweetest and cuddliest dog. We are having a tough time getting used to the crate though. She knows when my fiance and I have to go to work she has to go in the crate. We have tried giving her a bone to keep her occupied, putting an article of our clothing in the crate so she recognizes our scent, she has her favorite toys in the crate, but she whines for hours on end. For the last 2 weeks she has had 3 accidents in her crate, which is not bad at all! The puppy is in the crate from 8:30-12 she is out for an hour when my fiance comes home from lunch then she is in the crate from 1-3 and is let out again by my brother. Then she is out of her crate when my fiance gets home from work at 5. Any tips on how we can make this a less painful process and something she actually isn’t afraid of? She is also sleeping at the edge of the bed right now. Thank you!
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.

I had done a lot of research before I decided to purchase this crate, so I had read the reviews about packaging. The outside of the box was in good condition, but the inside packaging and crate itself was a mess! Styrofoam was everywhere. And by the time we finally got it untangled and put together, even the dogs were covered in it! The box didnt prevent the crate from becoming bent and tangled. With some tools and a strong hand, it took 2 of us an hour to put together. The crate itself is a little bent and the side door isn't very secure, but we used zip ties and all is well. Overall, we are pleased with our purchase.
We purchase this for our German Shepard for when we are not home. He now a little over a year and still not able to be out when not home. This size is huge and makes me feel better when I am at work and he is in his cage. He is comfortable in it with his bed and all his toys. He has tons of room to move around, straight up straight and comfortable. He is bigger than he would probably need but he is happy and make me happy that he has room to play if wanted to. Love the two doors so can be put in a location. Assembly was pretty easy. Need two people to go fast by I did by my self and used a chair to assist me. Would buy again if need be.
When it comes to picking the right dog carrier, there are three primary areas of consideration—safety, comfort and ease of use. While most will check all three boxes, it’s important to do your homework to ensure the pet carrier you pick provides the very best in all three categories. Keeping your dog safe while traveling is of utmost importance. When choosing a dog carrier, be sure it’s designed with a wide, sturdy base so it can’t tip as your dog moves and shifts her weight around. Make sure all doors and openings securely latch to keep your dog safely contained. And be sure the carrier you choose has plenty of ventilation. This is particularly important for nervous dogs who may anxiously pant while contained in her carrier.
I’ve never crate trained before, this is all new to me. My new puppy pees the bed when I let her sleep with me and she needs to be in the crate while I’m at work for 4 to 5 hours. She likes her crate and wont potty in it, but cries at night. I think she just needs to potty during the night like I do. I’m going to try taking her out every time I go pee and putting her back in. When she stops peeing the my bed at night she can sleep with me. I’ve never had a puppy pee my bed at night before, but she’s wat too small to jump down and up by hersel, and not yet house broken. Other than that she’s great, and this artical isn’t all wrong. Dogs dont like to potty where they sleep and eat, and they are pack animals so they usually sleep together. I feel bad making her sleep alone right now.
What I’m trying to understand is how do I keep puppy safe/keep from potting at night if I don’t keep him in the crate at night? We brought our puppy home a week ago and he’s slept in the crate since the first night. Outside of the first night, he’s slept through (10p-6a). I stayed downstairs with him the first 3 or 4 nights and moved him further into the kitchen each night. I’ve moved back up to my bedroom the last 3 nights. He yelps 5-10 minutes and then goes to sleep. Occasionally I put him in the crate during the day (preparing meals, using the bathroom). Am I doing more harm than good because he wasn’t introduced more gradually?
Treats™ members enjoy Free Standard Shipping on orders over $49. Members must sign in for discount to apply. Transaction total is prior to taxes & after discounts are applied. Due to size and/or weight, certain items bear a shipping surcharge or special handling fee, which will still apply. Savings will automatically reflect in shopping cart with the purchase of qualifying merchandise. Maximum value $75. Valid only on orders shipped within the contiguous 48 U.S. states, military APO/FPO addresses and select areas throughout Canada. Offer not valid on all or select products in the following categories: live pets; canned, fresh or frozen foods; select cat litters. Offer may not be combined with other promotional offers or discounts. Terms and conditions of this offer are subject to change at the sole discretion of PetSmart.
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