Hi, just adopted a Yorkie 4days ago. She is 12 weeks old. Just got a crate for her today. I live in a Seniors/Assisted Living apartment. Of course noise at night is very much undesirable. I have put her in the bathroom the first night (of course with bed, food & water, toys & pee pads.) I don’t know how 2 pounds of puppy can make that much noise. I let it go for a bit and then thought of eviction. Didn’t know what to do so let her out. What a mess in the morning from a puppy who was supposed to be pad trained. Everywhere but on the pee pad. Next night tried to use a travel bag, lots of room and just screened in sides. Lots more noise so brought her in the bedroom, night light on but she didn’t stop whining except when she was barking. Finally gave up at 4am and let her out but in my bed. Last night closed the bedroom door, her bed at the end of mine. Still a no go. In my bed again. Now I know I can’t put her in the crate for the night straight away and she has been in the crate with a treat for as long as the treat lasts and I’m there. I walk away and out she goes. The question is, until I have her happy in the crate, where do i put her without a mess and her sleeping with me? HELP.
How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
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Before you ever try to get your pup to step foot in their new crate, or even step near it, place the crate in a room where your dog spends a lot of his or her time. Remove or open the crate door, so your dog feels secure about exploring the ins and outs of their soon-to-be home. If he naturally shy’s away, that’s okay. Don’t force your dog to become familiar, rather try sitting beside the crate, and speaking to your pup in a friendly tone, placing treats around, and then eventually inside the crate until he finally steps in. Placing a familiar blanket or toy inside the crate is also a great way to entice them to enter.
Show it to the dog, let it smell and taste the treat, and then toss it inside the crate and shut the door, with the puppy outside the crate and the treat on the inside. That shows that an absolutely scrumptious puppy treat is inside, out of paw-reach. And after the pup has begged and scratched and whined to get inside, open the door and let it get the toy inside the crate. Allow your pup to chew and enjoy it for five minutes with the door shut and the dog remaining in the crate. Some pups settle down and enjoy their treat with no fanfare. Others throw a fit and want out. So if your puppy fusses let it out, but lock the treat back inside. You’re teaching the dog that wonderful things can be found inside the crate. Most pups learn to tolerate the door shut at least as long as they have something to munch.
• Material: Look for items constructed from a lightweight yet durable frame material such as aluminum or steel. Both options are light enough to make carrying and set up simple. These durable metals will also be able to hold up to the wear and tear exerted on a travel carrier. You’ll also need to make special considerations for pets that like to chew.
You want to make the crate a happy place. Place a snuggly blanket or dog bed inside. Or you can toss a toy inside, and encourage your pup to go get it. You want your dog to have positive experiences with the crate. Another idea is to find a puzzle toy that can be stuffed with a smelly, tasty treat. This should be a treat your puppy loves, but can only enjoy when inside the crate.
EliteField is one of the most popular dog crate manufacturers who won hearts of pet owners through low pricing and high quality materials. Their 3-door folding crate is the first of two soft sided crates to make the list of best dog travel crates due to great balance between travel-friendliness, features and ergonomics. Typically, when you put your pet in a crate to travel you want to be sure the crate is sturdy and won't collapse on your pet. However, if your dog will be in your care at all times, a soft crate may be the most appropriate.
When your pup is eating and spending a short period in their crate following a meal without any sign of distress, it’s time to start crating your pup for short periods while you’re at home. Call your dog over to the crate with a treat and an accompanying command – many use “kennel” or “kennel up” – and once your dog is inside, give them another treat, shut the door, and sit quietly with your pup for a few minutes before letting them out, giving them praise and another treat. From here, slowly add in minutes when you are away from the crate until your pup is comfortable with you being out of sight for 20-30 minutes. From here, you may begin leaving the house with your dog crated for short periods of time.

How do I transition my pup from kennel to being free? I’m so afraid of her peeing in the house while I’m not looking. She does very well in her kennel. I let her roam the house and she uses the bathroom in the backyard. However, I don’t know if she’s willing to wait for me to open the back door or she’s just going to pee in the house. I clock her bladder but I’m ready for her to let me know when she has to go. At times, I am letting her in the yard but she doesn’t have to use the bathroom. I rather let her out to the bathroom 6-10 times a day oppose to waiting for her to tell me. I am just tired of her not telling me. I don’t want to be upset with her so to avoid that I just let her out about every two hours un until 9:30. Her last meal is at 8pm. What to do?
Petego Pet Tube Car Kennel – And for something completely different, if you don't have an extra large dog who needs an indestructible cage but rather looking for something to fit multiple dogs at the back of your car, this may be a great alternative. This pet tube travel car kennel from Petego will be much cheaper and look substantially better in your car, and it also folds.
Crating also has benefits outside the home. A crated dog traveling in a car will have less chance of serious injury in case of an auto accident. If you’re traveling and stay overnight someplace, having your dog in a crate will ease the concerns of your hosts. Your dog will also be more comfortable inside the familiar surroundings of his or her own crate no matter where it’s set up.
Texascustomkennels crafted a beautiful piece of furniture tailored to our needs in our home. The craftsmanship that Robert and his team showed in crafting this kennel far exceeded my expectations. Robert gave speedy and excellent customer service in the creation process of understanding our vision for our custom kennel. Robert stayed in contact throughout the ordering process to the delivery process ensuring that the kennel was delivered in good condition. Thank you sooo much Robert and team we love our texascustomkennel!!!
The Single-Door Home Training Pet Crate is great for dogs of all ages and temperaments. This training kennel can be used to help contain your new dog or puppy until he or she is familiar with the house rules. This kennel can also be used as a safe place for your to dog to go if he has any anxiety over being left alone, loud noises or rowdy visitors. For ease of portability, this dog kennel can fold down and be carried by the ergonomic, latch-on handle. Created for both comfort and...
Their Wood Slats Pet Crate is the ideal home at home for your pet. Inspired by mission style end tables, this pet crate is a stylish and functional addition to your home. Spacious side slats and lockable mission style door provide ample open space for airflow and vision for your pet's peace of mind. Chew-resistant solid wood composition provides natural beauty and pet-safe durability that lasts.
If you travel with your dog in the car, you more than likely know the hassle of trying to get your dog to sit still when you are driving. Dogs may pace around, have trouble standing find themselves falling in between seats, or even worse, trying to take your lap over while you are in traffic. While you may want to take your pooch to different places, it is important to make sure they have a safe trip in the car, while still enjoying the ride. There are a lot of options to pick from when introducing safety measures into your car, so it is easy to get overwhelmed by choices. In this article, we will cover everything you need to know about having a safe trip with your dog, from crates, car harnesses, and general tips to get them to their destination, so get ready to check out the best dog crates for car travel and general transportation.
Keeping your specific needs, preferences, and details about your pet’s size in mind while looking at different options is an easy way to be sure you’ll pick the perfect travel crate for your dog. There are so many wonderful options, and you are sure to find a soft sided crate that keeps your furry companion happier and safer. Please leave us a comment below with your favorite travel crate options or a fun story about traveling with your pet.
The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate The Lucky Dog heavy duty wire training crate with E-coating finish is built for both durability and your pet's safety. Lucky Dog crates come with a divider panel carrying handle removable crate tray and clip-on rubber feet to protect the floor. Conveniently collapsible for easy transport and storage a Lucky ...  More + Product Details Close

Wire dog crates are ideal for pets with long coats or those who live in warmer climates. The continuous air flow keeps them cool while the open design allows them to see their surroundings. Wire and metal dog crate sizes range from X-Small, for a max weight of 20 LBS, all the way up to XX-Large, for a max weight of 140 LBS. While it’s good to know your dog’s weight, you can also reference our crate sizing guide to get a better idea of which size works for each breed.
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