As soon as your dog is eating his meals while standing all the way inside the crate, it’s time to close the door. After he’s done eating that first time, open the door immediately. You’ll leave him in longer and longer with each meal, adding just a few minutes every time.It’s possible that your dog may whine. If this happens, open the crate immediately and don’t leave him in as long next time. However, if he whines again, wait until he stops before letting him out or you will teach him that whining equals open door.
Her situation is not unique. Your (and others)crate training procedure assumes that the dog has an established room where he’s used to hanging out with the family and that you’ve had him/her for a while. Bull! You have to start this procedure on the very day you bring the puppy home. Otherwise, the puppy will get used to being in your bed, will start a bad habit of peeing on the floor and learn that barking and yipping through the night brings rewards. Please update your method to show how it’s done on day 1, not over time!! Thank You.
Finally, you'll want to be sure to check with the travel agency (if you're using one) and all locations where you will be staying to make sure that both pets and the type of crate you're taking are allowed. Remember to ask if they have unique crate specifications. This is particularly true for airlines, because each airline has their own guidelines, but the same can be said for every bus service, train service, and hotels. Planning ahead could save you from dealing with unnecessary issues during your travels.
Show it to the dog, let it smell and taste the treat, and then toss it inside the crate and shut the door, with the puppy outside the crate and the treat on the inside. That shows that an absolutely scrumptious puppy treat is inside, out of paw-reach. And after the pup has begged and scratched and whined to get inside, open the door and let it get the toy inside the crate. Allow your pup to chew and enjoy it for five minutes with the door shut and the dog remaining in the crate. Some pups settle down and enjoy their treat with no fanfare. Others throw a fit and want out. So if your puppy fusses let it out, but lock the treat back inside. You’re teaching the dog that wonderful things can be found inside the crate. Most pups learn to tolerate the door shut at least as long as they have something to munch.
The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight The PET LIFE Capacious Expandable wire folding lightweight collapsible crate is composed of heavy-duty Ballistic Nylon and Mesh with bendable yet sturdy built-in flexible extenders that hook and loop into place and hold up the 2 outer mesh expandable sides. Fully expands on both sides and collapses and folds. Perfect ...  More + Product Details Close
What I’m trying to understand is how do I keep puppy safe/keep from potting at night if I don’t keep him in the crate at night? We brought our puppy home a week ago and he’s slept in the crate since the first night. Outside of the first night, he’s slept through (10p-6a). I stayed downstairs with him the first 3 or 4 nights and moved him further into the kitchen each night. I’ve moved back up to my bedroom the last 3 nights. He yelps 5-10 minutes and then goes to sleep. Occasionally I put him in the crate during the day (preparing meals, using the bathroom). Am I doing more harm than good because he wasn’t introduced more gradually?

Bring your puppy to the crate for naps and quiet-time breaks so that he can “unwind” from family chaos. Start in increments of 10 minutes and work up to longer periods. Offer treats when he goes inside, and distraction toys, like a stuffed KONG. For years, this author has been giving her Yorkie a treat every day as soon as he goes into his crate and sits. Now as an adult dog, he runs to his crate each morning in anticipation of the goodie.

Another leader in its category, PetPeppy's premium airline approved dog travel crate is visually appealing, stylish and comes with a ton of features that makes it easy to carry your dog. It only comes in a single color (black with red accent) and have huge mesh windows on each side that will give your dog lots of ventilation. It's expandable that allows for tons of extra storage. As with all other pet carriers, this best dog travel crate doesn't need any assembly and it somewhat collapsible if you need to store it away. You won't need any tools for this one either.
OxGord Rolling Backpack Carrier – This is something a little different for those who aren't happy with standard best travel dog carriers. OxGord's rolling backpack pet carrier is a perfect choice for people looking for something like a dog backpack carrier but suitable for long distance travel. It's very durable, has wheels, is fairly easy to store but will not collapse completely.
Frisco's quality products are made for and by a family of pet lovers. And they're more than just everyday pet supplies. Crates become comforting kingdoms, potty pads transform into a favorite patch of grass, and potty bags give the signal that it's time to take care of business. From comfy mats and cat trees to potty time essentials, Frisco provides practical solutions for today's devoted pet parents. The entire Frisco line is available exclusively at Chewy.com!
Dog kennels create a cozy place to call their own, whether at home or on-the-go. With durable, versatile dog crates, pens, kennels, carriers and dog cages for pets of every size, you can give your best friend a secure, den-like retreat where they can sleep, rest and relax. At PetSmart, we carry a selection of stylish designs that make it easy to place their mini-home in your bedroom or living room.
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